Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Fukuoka philosophy applied indoors?

Expand Messages
  • Raju Titus
    Dear friend, Its good that you choose this way.Before beginning I advise you to read The One Straw Revolution. Thanks Raju ... -- Raju Titus.
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 9, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear friend,
      Its good that you choose this way.Before beginning I advise you to read "The
      One Straw Revolution."
      Thanks
      Raju

      On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 9:49 AM, jacare722000 <jacare722000@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > Your message inspired me to write. I live in an apartment and probably will
      > for the next few years, but want to begin growing food. How did you get
      > started? What material are your containers made from? What soil did you use?
      >
      > I, too would like to use Fukuoka methods in the process as well, so I
      > commend you on the attempt you're making at a transition. Thanks for your
      > time and consideration.
      >
      > Ezell
      >
      >
      > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening
      > during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use
      > HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows
      > me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
      > >
      > > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and
      > composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be
      > against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I
      > am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying
      > compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
      > >
      > > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely
      > erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either.
      > I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any
      > benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to
      > the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms
      > (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
      > >
      > > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's
      > principles indoors.
      > >
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Raju Titus. Hoshangabad.India.
      +919179738049


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gael.bage@btopenworld.com
      I live in SE UK and grow some stuff in a south facing lean-to greenhouse that gets some heat from the house, no special lights and find I can grow spinach,
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 10, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I live in SE UK and grow some stuff in a south facing lean-to greenhouse that gets some heat from the house, no special lights and find I can grow spinach, winter lettuce, chard, early peas short variety and stump rooted carrots,and spring onions. I overwintered autumn seedlings of cape gooseberry, they are just flowering, All without heat or lights, I use supermarket polystyrene vegetable boxes which insulate well against cold, and fill with homegrown compost inc worms, and mix in a little woodland soil which innoculates roots with local mycelium and beneficial bacteria. They are all growing strongly.
        Early cucumbers french beans and tomatoes will go in soon.

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
        >
        > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
        >
        > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
        >
        > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
        >
        > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.