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Fukuoka philosophy applied indoors?

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  • kmcdonou1
    As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 27, 2010
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      As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.

      Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").

      Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?

      Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.
    • 倩 冯
      Dear friends,   I am looking for the natural farms.I hope I can go there and study your experience.I am in Montreal now.So,where are you?Is there anybody in
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 27, 2010
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        Dear friends,
         
        I am looking for the natural farms.I hope I can go there and study your experience.I am in Montreal now.So,where are you?Is there anybody in Canada or USA?
         
        Tks
         
        Qian

        --- 10年1月28日,周四, kmcdonou1 <kmcdonou1@...> 写道:


        发件人: kmcdonou1 <kmcdonou1@...>
        主题: [fukuoka_farming] Fukuoka philosophy applied indoors?
        收件人: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        日期: 2010年1月28日,周四,上午4:57


         



        As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.

        Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").

        Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?

        Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.









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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • sashenkal
        I believe that cover crops (you d have to find the right one...) would be beneficial. Using cover crops will give you the opportunity to fix nitrogen in the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 28, 2010
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          I believe that cover crops (you'd have to find the right one...) would be beneficial. Using cover crops will give you the opportunity to fix nitrogen in the soil and aerate the bed without having to till. The only concern would be a crop getting out of hand and becoming an aggressor... however with the right selection (depending on the other plants you harvest) I think it would work just fine. have you thought about red clover?

          sashenka

          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
          >
          > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
          >
          > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
          >
          > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
          >
          > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.
          >
        • Tom Gibson
          This will work really well as long as your chickens help decompose the straw. lol You can see what is going on in our food forest at
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 28, 2010
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            This will work really well as long as your chickens help decompose the
            straw. lol



            You can see what is going on in our food forest at
            <http://www.camaspermaculture.org> www.camaspermaculture.org
            <mailto:tom@...> tom@...
            Tom Gibson



            Ask your Congressman and Senators why the US Department of Agriculture
            subsidizes toxic industrial chemicals like HFCS (high fructose corn syrup)
            but not fresh vegetables!





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • kmcdonou1
            If I chose to use a cover crop, I was thinking of white clover. It doesn t grow very high. Do you think I should shear the cover crop after a while and let
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 28, 2010
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              If I chose to use a cover crop, I was thinking of white clover. It doesn't grow very high.

              Do you think I should shear the cover crop after a while and let microorganisms eventually break it down into the soil? Replanting after it has been fully consumed. Or, should it be kept alive continuously?

              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "sashenkal" <apochalypse@...> wrote:
              >
              > I believe that cover crops (you'd have to find the right one...) would be beneficial. Using cover crops will give you the opportunity to fix nitrogen in the soil and aerate the bed without having to till. The only concern would be a crop getting out of hand and becoming an aggressor... however with the right selection (depending on the other plants you harvest) I think it would work just fine. have you thought about red clover?
              >
              > sashenka
              >
            • jacare722000
              Hello, Your message inspired me to write. I live in an apartment and probably will for the next few years, but want to begin growing food. How did you get
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 8, 2010
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                Hello,

                Your message inspired me to write. I live in an apartment and probably will for the next few years, but want to begin growing food. How did you get started? What material are your containers made from? What soil did you use?

                I, too would like to use Fukuoka methods in the process as well, so I commend you on the attempt you're making at a transition. Thanks for your time and consideration.

                Ezell

                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
                >
                > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
                >
                > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
                >
                > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
                >
                > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.
                >
              • Raju Titus
                Dear friend, Its good that you choose this way.Before beginning I advise you to read The One Straw Revolution. Thanks Raju ... -- Raju Titus.
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 9, 2010
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                  Dear friend,
                  Its good that you choose this way.Before beginning I advise you to read "The
                  One Straw Revolution."
                  Thanks
                  Raju

                  On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 9:49 AM, jacare722000 <jacare722000@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Hello,
                  >
                  > Your message inspired me to write. I live in an apartment and probably will
                  > for the next few years, but want to begin growing food. How did you get
                  > started? What material are your containers made from? What soil did you use?
                  >
                  > I, too would like to use Fukuoka methods in the process as well, so I
                  > commend you on the attempt you're making at a transition. Thanks for your
                  > time and consideration.
                  >
                  > Ezell
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                  > "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening
                  > during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use
                  > HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows
                  > me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
                  > >
                  > > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and
                  > composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be
                  > against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I
                  > am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying
                  > compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
                  > >
                  > > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely
                  > erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either.
                  > I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any
                  > benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to
                  > the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms
                  > (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
                  > >
                  > > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's
                  > principles indoors.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Raju Titus. Hoshangabad.India.
                  +919179738049


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • gael.bage@btopenworld.com
                  I live in SE UK and grow some stuff in a south facing lean-to greenhouse that gets some heat from the house, no special lights and find I can grow spinach,
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 10, 2010
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                    I live in SE UK and grow some stuff in a south facing lean-to greenhouse that gets some heat from the house, no special lights and find I can grow spinach, winter lettuce, chard, early peas short variety and stump rooted carrots,and spring onions. I overwintered autumn seedlings of cape gooseberry, they are just flowering, All without heat or lights, I use supermarket polystyrene vegetable boxes which insulate well against cold, and fill with homegrown compost inc worms, and mix in a little woodland soil which innoculates roots with local mycelium and beneficial bacteria. They are all growing strongly.
                    Early cucumbers french beans and tomatoes will go in soon.

                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "kmcdonou1" <kmcdonou1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > As I live in a winter climate I play around with some indoor gardening during the winter. Tomatoes, lettuces, peppers are my primary focus. I use HID lighting. It's expensive to produce the vegetables I do, but it allows me to garden more often then the seasons dictate.
                    >
                    > Any way, I was thinking about Fukuoka's principles of cover crops and composting in regards to my indoor garden. I am sure Fukuoka would be against indoors growing with lights as it is not natural. None-the-less, I am wondering if there is any value of using a cover crop or simply applying compost materials to the tops of my gardening bins (4' x 2' x 12").
                    >
                    > Obviously some of the benefits of cover crops don't apply indoors (namely erosion and weed control). I also, don't want to till my indoor beds either. I want them to be somewhat self sustaining. Would a cover crop add any benefits in my indoors garden or would I be better off adding materials to the top of the beds (e.g. straw) that could be broken down my microorganisms (or I was thinking about adding some worms to my bins) over time?
                    >
                    > Just trying to see what input you can provide on adapting Fukuoka's principles indoors.
                    >
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