Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: ducks for slugs and snails

Expand Messages
  • jhereg9333
    I have no experience with this, but, based purely on reading, I think the ducks are supposed to have selective access to the garden. So, keep them out while
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 20, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I have no experience with this, but, based purely on reading, I think the ducks are supposed to have selective access to the garden. So, keep them out while seedlings are starting, let them in once they're established. I guess the idea is that over time, the slug/snail population will eventually balance out at a low enough level that they're not too destructive, even if the ducks aren't around.

      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, david.keltie@... wrote:
      >
      > Answering my own question here. From http://www.runnerduck.net/ "What
      > do runner ducks eat......This will include a lot of slugs and worms
      > and insects found in the grass, stream and garden.. It will also
      > include greens......" Yikes - so not a good solution. I wonder why
      > it's often trotted out by permaculturists? Or does anyway here have
      > actual experience of using ducks for pest control in a small-scale
      > system and them not eating/trashing the greens (I don't need ducks for
      > that).
      >
      > Cheers, David
      >
      >
      >
      > On Fri, Nov 20, 2009 at 1:00 PM, <david.keltie@...> wrote:
      > > OK - anyone here with actual experience of keeping Runner ducks? Do
      > > they really gobble up the nasties but leave the winter veg alone (ie
      > > not gobbling it or trampling into the mire)? Or is this just a myth?
      > > I'd try it myself and see but I need those greens to get through the
      > > winter!
      > >
      > > Thanks, David
      > >
      > > On Thu, Nov 19, 2009 at 5:25 AM, Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...> wrote:
      > >> Ducks generally don't disturb established greens. They like the tender
      > >> shoots when they come up especially grasses. They also like to dig with
      > >> their bills in mud. Don't actually need water but helps with heavier breeds
      > >> if you want them to mate. Muscovy's are tree ducks. If they ever decide they
      > >> like your trees more than the roost you provide then that is where they will
      > >> be from then on at night. Might not work out so well if you get a hard
      > >> freeze. Best to clip the flight feathers or keep them contained if possible.
      > >> Best slug bird is reputed to be Runners, a lightweight bird, not great for
      > >> meat but a good layer if you want eggs.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Another way to supplement duck food is leave a light on at night close to
      > >> the ground. Gives them hours of entertainment eating the flies, moths and
      > >> mosquitoes in the area. Ducks can also clean mosquito larvae out of a pond
      > >> if you have enough of them for the size of the body of water.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> You can see what is going on in our food forest
      > >> and get more information about local food security at
      > >> �<http://camaspermaculture.blogspot.com/> www.camaspermaculture.org
      > >>
      > >> Tom Gibson
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> ------------------------------------
      > >>
      > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      >
    • Bobby Ray
      In Oregon, I had a 300 foot driveway always wet from mini springs and my ducks walked up and down my driveway all day long grabbing slugs rinsing them off in
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 20, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        In Oregon, I had a 300 foot driveway always wet from mini springs and my
        ducks walked up and down my driveway all day long grabbing slugs rinsing
        them off in the tiny puddles and as a miracle of God's great creation
        converted them into wonderful tasting eggs each day. Yummy Yummy eggs from
        slimy slugs. (-;

        On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 9:28 PM, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hi Frank,
        >
        > Do you have experience with this... I have tried ducks twice and found they
        > sought out my greens and the worms and ignored the trickier to find slugs
        > and snails.... though I have not tried Muscovy ducks yet.
        >
        > Still wish I could get it to work as I love ducks but not sure it is
        > viable!
        >
        > Cheers, Linda
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
        > [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>]
        > On Behalf Of Frank McAvinchey
        > Sent: Wednesday, 18 November 2009 4:08 PM
        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Invitation to view a photo from Raju's
        > Picasa
        > Web Album - NO NEED TO PREPARE COMPOST OR BRINGING IT FROM OUT SIDE.
        >
        > My friend, it sounds like it is time for you to invest in some ducks.
        > Muskovy, kaki campbell, etc. They are the ultimate slug/snail murderers.
        > That is the solution to your problem. Forget switching crops. The
        > Muskovys are large, meaty birds, while the Kaki campbells are champion egg
        > layers, though much smaller.
        >
        > Frank
        >
        > On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 4:17 AM, <david.keltie@...<david.keltie%40gmail.com>>
        > wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > Great picture which illustrates the technique well. But following this
        > > method, I've been finding slugs and snails decimate emergent
        > > seedlings. I've instead been growing seeds in modules for planting out
        > > when the seedlings are big enough to survive the slug and snail
        > > attacks and plant enough of them to be able to accept the losses of
        > > the ones that don't make it.
        > >
        > > Lately, I've begun wondering if I'm trying to grow the wrong crops......
        > >
        > > Cheers, David
        > >
        > >
        > > On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 7:30 AM, Raju
        > <rajuktitus@... <rajuktitus%40gmail.com><rajuktitus%40gmail.com>>
        > > wrote:
        > > > Dear farnk and all,
        > > > I am growing wheat in rice straw and growing mung and rice in wheat
        > > straw
        > > > since last many years with N.F.. I never made compost and bring it out
        > > side
        > > > and getting better yields compare with farmers those using compost and
        > > > chemical fertilizers. If i am getting better results than why should i
        > > > bring fertilizer from out side. Actually need of fertilizer is always
        > > > in "tilled soil" not in zero tillage. -Raju
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
        > http://picasaweb.google.co.in/lh/sredir?uname=rajuktitus&target=PHOTO&id=540
        >
        > 4965510673767474&aid=5404965511230413217&authkey=Gv1sRgCLH2rKnS2c6gEg&invite
        > =CJz29t4K&feat=email
        >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Frank McAvinchey
        I have no personal experience with this. I have the word of multitudes of others that this has worked wonderfully. You are the only person I ve ever heard
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 21, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          I have no personal experience with this. I have the word of multitudes of
          others that this has worked wonderfully. You are the only person I've ever
          heard say that ducks did poorly on slugs/snails. Sorry to hear that.
          Perhaps another sort of duck? I would poll the forum to ask what sort of
          ducks people have had good results with.

          Cheers,

          Frank

          On Wed, Nov 18, 2009 at 12:28 AM, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>wrote:

          >
          >
          > Hi Frank,
          >
          > Do you have experience with this... I have tried ducks twice and found they
          > sought out my greens and the worms and ignored the trickier to find slugs
          > and snails.... though I have not tried Muscovy ducks yet.
          >
          > Still wish I could get it to work as I love ducks but not sure it is
          > viable!
          >
          > Cheers, Linda
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
          > [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>]
          > On Behalf Of Frank McAvinchey
          > Sent: Wednesday, 18 November 2009 4:08 PM
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Invitation to view a photo from Raju's
          > Picasa
          > Web Album - NO NEED TO PREPARE COMPOST OR BRINGING IT FROM OUT SIDE.
          >
          > My friend, it sounds like it is time for you to invest in some ducks.
          > Muskovy, kaki campbell, etc. They are the ultimate slug/snail murderers.
          > That is the solution to your problem. Forget switching crops. The
          > Muskovys are large, meaty birds, while the Kaki campbells are champion egg
          > layers, though much smaller.
          >
          > Frank
          >
          > On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 4:17 AM, <david.keltie@...<david.keltie%40gmail.com>>
          > wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Great picture which illustrates the technique well. But following this
          > > method, I've been finding slugs and snails decimate emergent
          > > seedlings. I've instead been growing seeds in modules for planting out
          > > when the seedlings are big enough to survive the slug and snail
          > > attacks and plant enough of them to be able to accept the losses of
          > > the ones that don't make it.
          > >
          > > Lately, I've begun wondering if I'm trying to grow the wrong crops......
          > >
          > > Cheers, David
          > >
          > >
          > > On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 7:30 AM, Raju
          > <rajuktitus@... <rajuktitus%40gmail.com><rajuktitus%40gmail.com>>
          > > wrote:
          > > > Dear farnk and all,
          > > > I am growing wheat in rice straw and growing mung and rice in wheat
          > > straw
          > > > since last many years with N.F.. I never made compost and bring it out
          > > side
          > > > and getting better yields compare with farmers those using compost and
          > > > chemical fertilizers. If i am getting better results than why should i
          > > > bring fertilizer from out side. Actually need of fertilizer is always
          > > > in "tilled soil" not in zero tillage. -Raju
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
          > http://picasaweb.google.co.in/lh/sredir?uname=rajuktitus&target=PHOTO&id=540
          >
          > 4965510673767474&aid=5404965511230413217&authkey=Gv1sRgCLH2rKnS2c6gEg&invite
          > =CJz29t4K&feat=email
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • PJ
          Emilia Hazelip, who many of you know was sort of a western disciple of Fukuoka, called her system Synergistic Gardening. In a video about her method, which
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 23, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Emilia Hazelip, who many of you know was sort of a western disciple of Fukuoka, called her system "Synergistic Gardening." In a video about her method, which relies heavily on a constant cover of mulch, she mentions the slug/duck issue specifically. You can watch the video in 3 parts on Youtube, starting here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugFd1JdFaE0

            From the video:
            "I got the Indian Runner ducks as slug predators. These ducks are reputed to be the best slug-eaters among ducks. But unfortunately, these ones, after a while, developed a strong taste for greens. Now, they are no longer allowed to be free all over the garden! There are other predators for slugs: lizards, snakes, frogs, toads, hedgehogs, some birds, and some kinds of beetles."

            Then she also mentions using thin strips/cylinders of copper to protect young seedlings from slugs.

            Incidentally, I've been using Hazelip's method for the last year and am very pleased with it. This group and its files/links sections have been such a wonderful resource, thank you all!
            PJ

            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have no personal experience with this. I have the word of multitudes of
            > others that this has worked wonderfully. You are the only person I've ever
            > heard say that ducks did poorly on slugs/snails. Sorry to hear that.
            > Perhaps another sort of duck? I would poll the forum to ask what sort of
            > ducks people have had good results with.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Frank
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.