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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Green Living

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  • Yugandhar S
    Thanks Frank for pointing to this great resource. Just looked at the home page. Still more to go. --Yugandhar ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 18, 2009
      Thanks Frank for pointing to this great resource. Just looked at the home
      page. Still more to go.

      --Yugandhar

      On Thu, Nov 19, 2009 at 8:25 AM, Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...> wrote:

      > Check out www.solviva.com. A lady from Sweden came to U.S. and built this
      > beautiful place, a veritable Eden. Same sorts of ideas as your article, or
      > very similar.
      >
      > Frank
      >
      > On Wed, Nov 18, 2009 at 9:06 AM, Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>
      > wrote:
      >
      > > Hi,
      > > Somewhat off topic to the theme of this group. But I found this
      > > interesting.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Zero-waste-policy-Green-heros-home-now-a-must-visit/articleshow/5238001.cms
      > >
      > > --Yugandhar
      > > Zero waste policy: Green hero's home now a must-visitBishwanath Ghosh,
      > TNN
      > > 17 November 2009, 04:03am IST
      > > Text Size:
      > > |
      > > *Topics*:
      > >
      > > - *Chennai* <
      > http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topics.cms?query=Chennai
      > > >
      > > - *S Indra Kumar*<
      > > http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topics.cms?query=S%20Indra%20Kumar>
      > > - *Zero Waste*<
      > > http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topics.cms?query=Zero%20Waste>
      > >
      > >
      > > CHENNAI: For S Indra Kumar, a machine operator-turned-environment
      > activist,
      > > charity begins at home. No chemical, save the soap he uses, enters his
      > > home.
      > > And no waste is ever let out. This makes his modest dwelling in Pammal,
      > the
      > > southern suburbs of Chennai, a "zero-waste home".
      > >
      > > He didn't have to read rocket science to turn his residence into an
      > "green"
      > > home. He is inspired by the simple, age-old chemical process that every
      > > housewife in India is familiar with. "If you leave a bowl of milk behind
      > > for
      > > five days, how will it smell when you come back? Rotten, right? But if
      > you
      > > put a drop of buttermilk into it before you leave, you'll find fresh
      > curd!"
      > > beams Indra Kumar (59), whose 1986-built house has now become a
      > pilgrimage
      > > for those wanting to do their bit for the environment � be it farmers
      > from
      > > Arakkonam or school students from Chennai.
      > >
      > > "Here, smell it," says Indra Kumar, as he opens the lid of the septic
      > tank
      > > in his garden. One instinctively recoils, but its contents look as
      > harmless
      > > as accumulated rain water. "Is there smell?" No. "Do you see any
      > > mosquitoes?" No. "That's because I treat sewage with a certain bacteria,"
      > > he
      > > declares. The bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, neutralise the sewage to turn
      > > waste into manure for plants in his garden.
      > >
      > > Then, the earthworm takes care of the liquid waste from the kitchen.
      > Under
      > > the drainage pipe, Kumar has buried some worms which not only digest the
      > > organic matter but also feed on mosquito eggs. And at the spot where
      > water
      > > from the bathroom drains out, he grows cama plant, whose roots treat the
      > > soap water.
      > >
      > > Solid waste from kitchen is collected in an earthen pot and dried cowdung
      > > sprinkled on it periodically. "Any smell?" Indra Kumar asks. No. "Any
      > fly?"
      > > No. "In 60 days this will turn into beautiful compost," he exclaims. He
      > > treats leaves from the garden similarly: collects them in drums and
      > > sprinkles dried cowdung on them till they turn into compost. "This way,
      > you
      > > give back to nature what it gives you. People often burn dry leaves,
      > which
      > > only causes pollution."
      > >
      > > Indra Kumar's fascination for composting is understandable because in
      > 2004,
      > > he took voluntary retirement from Areva (formerly the English Electric
      > > Company, where he worked as a machine-man and then as a purchase
      > > supervisor)
      > > to take up vermi-composting. Today, as the president of Home Exnora, he
      > is
      > > a
      > > sought-after man who is called by universities and citizens' group to
      > speak
      > > on waste management. "If you control pollution at the micro-level, it
      > > doesn't require any money or the government's involvement. People only
      > > think
      > > about what they eat or what they drink. But what about the air that you
      > > breathe non-stop, right from the time you are born?" Kumar asks.
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


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