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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: How does it compare?

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  • David Douglas
    Hello Nandan, Those years pass quickly don t they? This coming spring will be the beginning of year 5 here for the vineyard, vegetable & perennial gardens. It
    Message 1 of 27 , Nov 18, 2009
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      Hello Nandan,

      Those years pass quickly don't they? This coming spring will be the
      beginning of year 5 here for the vineyard, vegetable & perennial gardens. It
      is just my wife and I so we keep it small and we do as much as possible
      without polluting machinery. We have seen a nice change here as we cut the
      weeds and pile them around the plants growing right in their area. We are
      learning the importance of covering as much bare ground as possible with
      leaves, weeds and grass clippings. We also don't pull the weeds but rather
      shear them off (as Fukuoka recommends) so as not to disturb the lifeforms in
      the ground.

      Also, we are seeing a great improvement as the ground cover expands over the
      area. As the clovers,
      Milfoil & Creeping Thyme go to seed I help them out by gathering the seeds
      and broadcasting them over other needy areas. This way we are using the
      native plants that are happy growing in this climate. More & more beneficial
      insects are showing up each year.

      I have made plenty of mistakes & am sure I will make plenty more but they
      are becoming less frequent
      as I learn. I feel that the only way not to make mistakes is to do nothing
      at all and that would be a big mistake in itself. As Fukuoka said he made a
      major mistake when he first took over his family's orchard
      and being disillushioned with mankind after the war decided not to do
      anything but to let it grow without
      his interference. He himself said the bugs wiped it out in short order. He
      learned from that experience.

      Thank you for your comments Nandan, good hearing from you my friend.

      Have a great day,
      Dave in the Adirondack Mountains, US


      On 11/18/09, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > David,
      >
      > This is absolutely right,it takes a number of years to make the land
      > fertile. But typically what we see is the end result of years of hard work
      > and nobody highlights initial struggle and failures.
      >
      > Here is a statement from Fukuoka san in One straw revolution - section
      > Farming among weeds, last paragraph.
      >
      > "In making the transition to this kind of farming, some weeding, composting
      > or pruning may be necessary at first, but these measures should be gradually
      > reduced each year. Ultimately, it is not the growing technique, which is the
      > most important factor, but rather the state of mind of the farmer."
      >
      > Some times I don't get why people can not admit failures and put the
      > facts/figures right...state of mind of the farmer plays an important role
      > here.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Nandan
      >
      > --- On Wed, 11/18/09, David Douglas <earthworks2@...<earthworks2%40gmail.com>>
      > wrote:
      >
      > From: David Douglas <earthworks2@... <earthworks2%40gmail.com>>
      > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: How does it compare?
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 2:45 AM
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > One thing I do recall reading from Fukuoka is that a natural farmer
      >
      > can expect several years of hard work in the beginning while the land is
      >
      > becoming healthy & is moving toward being self sustaining. He himself
      >
      > experienced this. However, ultimately his production equalled or surpassed
      >
      > scientific farmers in his region and his produce was in the highest demand
      >
      > for it's quality.
      >
      > It really is a joy to see the land come alive when treated with respect.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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