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Re: Newly cleared land COVERED in Cassia Obtusifolia!

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  • jaw_i_am
    I m from south Alabama. I ve had goats and cattle on pasture with this weed. Nothing eats it. Will sheep eat it? It is only poisonous in large amounts. It
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 1, 2009
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      I'm from south Alabama. I've had goats and cattle on pasture with this weed. Nothing eats it. Will sheep eat it? It is only poisonous in large amounts. It is also very easy to pull after a rain in the sandy soils of the South. Pokeweed is also easy to eradicate by pulling. But the birds will spread it for you. Also, privett will/can be a problem for you. But goats and sheep love them and a little browse is always good. The two most common pasture grasses are going to be bermuda and bahaia grass. You can collect bahaia seed from the sides of the road, and get some bermuda clippings from a neighbor and disk them in. They will take root at every joint. Rye grass for winter pasture seeded one year usually will give you adequate self-seeding for many years unless you overgraze.
      Good luck down there. I got tired of the sorry soils in the deep south (and the chicken CAFO's), and have moved to the blacklands of TX.
    • Tom Gibson
      Sounds like you need to chill. No one was being harsh, just realistic. Not being sure how realistic and flexible you are about this makes it hard to judge what
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Sounds like you need to chill. No one was being harsh, just realistic. Not
        being sure how realistic and flexible you are about this makes it hard to
        judge what to tell you. Bottom line-you have to do what you can. Don't let
        anything you have learned about natural farming become an inflexible
        religious belief.



        My point was that you are in a state of transition. Do what you have to get
        to where you want to go.



        You can see what is going on in our food forest
        and get more information about local food security at
        <http://camaspermaculture.blogspot.com/> Camas Permaculture

        Tom Gibson





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      • MKTurner7@aol.com
        I do rotational grazing. But I still need to provide some negative pressure on the plants that the sheep won t eat, otherwise they ll slowly gain the upper
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 1, 2009
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          I do rotational grazing. But I still need to provide some negative
          pressure on the plants that the sheep won't eat, otherwise they'll slowly gain
          the upper hand over the plants that the sheep like to eat. Also mowing helps
          to knock down their seed production to keep them from spreading by seed.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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