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Re: Seed Balls

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  • seaseal
    These wonderful inventions by Masanobu Fukuoka solved several problems: --birds eating seeds --seeds sprouting before sufficient moisture existed --getting
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 27, 2009
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      These wonderful inventions by Masanobu Fukuoka solved several problems:
      --birds eating seeds
      --seeds sprouting before sufficient moisture existed
      --getting seed, especially smaller seed, distributed.

      Making seed balls is fun--we recently had a "Seed Ball Party" with my
      Sustainable Re-skilling Group.

      We took potting soil, semi-moist compost, and locally gathered native
      plant seeds, with a little clay powder added. We added just a little
      clay powder (ground up unfired clay art projects or, actual clay that
      has been finely ground up). We saved the rest of the clay powder in a
      flat pan.

      We gooshed this all up and then let the balls sit for a bit to dry out.

      Then we rolled the balls in the pan of clay powder to coat the outside
      totally with clay.

      We then let them dry. We had collected lots of low, flat cardboard
      boxes (the kind sodas often come in; we got them from the liquor
      store) to carry our seed balls home.

      Many of us tossed a few out the windows of our cars or off the back of
      our bikes as we returned home. We chose likely spots, such as the
      verge alongside the road where some shade existed.

      We know these balls will protect the seed until enough rain has fallen
      to break open the clay seal. The seeds then have all the nutrient they
      need to get started.

      This is a great project to do with kids, but adults really enjoy this
      activity too. It's a really good one for doing a Fukuoka-style garden,
      with radish, lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, and more.

      For more about seed balls, just google the topic. You'll find lots of
      ideas.

      Cecile
      seaseal@...


      We see things, not as they are,
      but as we are.
      --Anais Nin
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