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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Natural Farming in California

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  • Bill Maxwell
    Lundbergh Farms used to do it (they might still) under, I think, the name nutrafarming .
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 23, 2009
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      Lundbergh Farms used to do it (they might still) under, I think, the
      name "nutrafarming".

      s.steckel wrote:
      >
      >
      > I am researching no till grain farming in California. I have to narrow
      > down my topic to a specific grain eventually but I am having problems
      > finding information on notill/natural/ conservation till (there are
      > too many names for it now) in California. I read that Fukuoka had
      > visited California and there was a 7500 acre rice farm that converted
      > to Natural Farming but I can't find anything on that farm or any other
      > farm with like practices. Does know of any other farms that follow
      > practices similar to Fukuoka's in California?
      >
      > Any help would appreciated as this is for a class assignment and I
      > would much rather do a paper on a crop using techniques that I am
      > interested in than something like grape production.
      > Thank you.
      > Steckel
      >
      >
    • Robert Monie
      Hi,   Unfortunately no-till today often means using large amounts of Round-Up and not anything close to Natural Farming. One small California
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 24, 2009
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        Hi,
         
        Unfortunately "no-till" today often means using large amounts of Round-Up and not anything close to Natural Farming. One small California farmer, George Stevens, owner of Synergy Seeds, uses organic methods that verge on natural.   He would be a good starting point in your research. See his website http://www.synergyseeds.com or contact him by email at
        synergy67@....
         
        Most of the California references in Fukuoka's books are either defunct or have passed on to other (less-sustainable) methods of farming.

        Bob Monie
        New Orleans, LA
         
        --- On Wed, 9/23/09, s.steckel <s.steckel@...> wrote:


        From: s.steckel <s.steckel@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Natural Farming in California
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 11:30 AM


         



        I am researching no till grain farming in California. I have to narrow down my topic to a specific grain eventually but I am having problems finding information on notill/natural/ conservation till (there are too many names for it now) in California. I read that Fukuoka had visited California and there was a 7500 acre rice farm that converted to Natural Farming but I can't find anything on that farm or any other farm with like practices. Does know of any other farms that follow practices similar to Fukuoka's in California?

        Any help would appreciated as this is for a class assignment and I would much rather do a paper on a crop using techniques that I am interested in than something like grape production.
        Thank you.
        Steckel
















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      • Robert Monie
        Hi Again,   Although they grow vegetables rather than grain, The Shumei Farm at 6040 Bonny Doon Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 is worthy of mention. They practice
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 24, 2009
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          Hi Again,
           
          Although they grow vegetables rather than grain, The Shumei Farm at 6040 Bonny Doon Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 is worthy of mention. They practice natural farming the way I like it, with no animal manure, and they regularly have open house for visitors curious about their farming methods. You can call them at 831-427-2672 for more information. They definitely do not use Round-Up!  The Shumeis like to travel about in search of other natural farmers, so if anybody is growing grain naturally in California, they probably know.
           
          Bob Monie
          New Orleans, La
          USA

          --- On Wed, 9/23/09, s.steckel <s.steckel@...> wrote:


          From: s.steckel <s.steckel@...>
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Natural Farming in California
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 11:30 AM


           



          I am researching no till grain farming in California. I have to narrow down my topic to a specific grain eventually but I am having problems finding information on notill/natural/ conservation till (there are too many names for it now) in California. I read that Fukuoka had visited California and there was a 7500 acre rice farm that converted to Natural Farming but I can't find anything on that farm or any other farm with like practices. Does know of any other farms that follow practices similar to Fukuoka's in California?

          Any help would appreciated as this is for a class assignment and I would much rather do a paper on a crop using techniques that I am interested in than something like grape production.
          Thank you.
          Steckel
















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        • Robert Monie
          Hi,   George Stevens of Synergy Seeds in California grows a little buckwheat, wheat, rye, and other grain mostly for his seed business. His methods range from
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 24, 2009
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            Hi,
             
            George Stevens of Synergy Seeds in California grows a little buckwheat, wheat, rye, and other grain mostly for his seed business. His methods range from organic to natural, generally producing very high quality seed. See http://www.synergyseeds.com or email him at synergy67@....  He and the Santa Cruz Schumei are the only up to date sources I know for natural farming in California today (though we must hope there are many more.) Unfortunately "no-till" is often a code word for "bring on the Round-Up."
             
            Bob Monie
            New Orleans, LA 70119
            Zone 8

            --- On Wed, 9/23/09, s.steckel <s.steckel@...> wrote:


            From: s.steckel <s.steckel@...>
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Natural Farming in California
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 11:30 AM


             



            I am researching no till grain farming in California. I have to narrow down my topic to a specific grain eventually but I am having problems finding information on notill/natural/ conservation till (there are too many names for it now) in California. I read that Fukuoka had visited California and there was a 7500 acre rice farm that converted to Natural Farming but I can't find anything on that farm or any other farm with like practices. Does know of any other farms that follow practices similar to Fukuoka's in California?

            Any help would appreciated as this is for a class assignment and I would much rather do a paper on a crop using techniques that I am interested in than something like grape production.
            Thank you.
            Steckel
















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          • Tom Gibson
            Contact the extension offices in your region and ask them. No till is getting pretty big in California although Natural Farming might be a little more
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 24, 2009
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              Contact the extension offices in your region and ask them. No till is
              getting pretty big in California although "Natural Farming" might be a
              little more difficult to locate. There are a lot of research papers on no
              till in ATTRA as well.



              Extension Office Locator <http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/>
              Every county has a USDA funded agricultural extension office through the
              land grant university in their state. Contact your extension office with
              questions about horticultural and agricultural problems, training, and
              technical assistance.
              http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/



              National Center for Sustainable Agriculture <http://attra.ncat.org/>
              Looking for the latest in sustainable agriculture and organic farming news,
              events and funding opportunities? We feature all that, plus in-depth
              publications on production practices, alternative crop and livestock
              enterprises, innovative marketing, organic certification, and highlights of
              local, regional, USDA and other federal sustainable ag activities.
              http://attra.ncat.org/



              You can see what is going on in our garden
              and get more information about local food security
              and sustainable farming at <http://camaspermaculture.blogspot.com/> Camas
              Permaculture

              Tom Gibson





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            • seaseal
              You might be able to find out information on this method of farming by contacting the Center for Agro-ecology at UCSC. I saw Fukuoka speak there in 1978 or 79.
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 24, 2009
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                You might be able to find out information on this method of farming by
                contacting the Center for Agro-ecology at UCSC. I saw Fukuoka speak
                there in 1978 or 79. Also check with Eco-farming Association in
                Watsonville. They may have some good connections. Their Eco-Farm
                Conference in January may even have a speaker on "natural" farming
                techniques.

                Cecile
                seaseal@...

                Be not afraid of growing slowly; be afraid only of standing still.

                ~Chinese proverb




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              • rajeshasolanki
                I have a friend around San Luis Obispo who has developed a method with grain that seems to me to be a marriage between Fukuoka and Grow Biointensive. I think
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 25, 2009
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                  I have a friend around San Luis Obispo who has developed a method with grain that seems to me to be a marriage between Fukuoka and Grow Biointensive. I think the method has a lot of potential and a great way to implement Fukuoka in the Northern California environment. He can be reached through: http://withthegrain.org/

                  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "s.steckel" <s.steckel@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I am researching no till grain farming in California. I have to narrow down my topic to a specific grain eventually but I am having problems finding information on notill/natural/conservation till (there are too many names for it now) in California. I read that Fukuoka had visited California and there was a 7500 acre rice farm that converted to Natural Farming but I can't find anything on that farm or any other farm with like practices. Does know of any other farms that follow practices similar to Fukuoka's in California?
                  >
                  > Any help would appreciated as this is for a class assignment and I would much rather do a paper on a crop using techniques that I am interested in than something like grape production.
                  > Thank you.
                  > Steckel
                  >
                • Tom Gibson
                  Fukuoka used animal manure. You can see what is going on in our food forest and get more information about local food security at
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 25, 2009
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                    Fukuoka used animal manure.



                    You can see what is going on in our food forest
                    and get more information about local food security at
                    <http://camaspermaculture.blogspot.com/> Camas Permaculture

                    Tom Gibson





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                  • Robert Monie
                    Yes, Fukuoka did use chicken manure, but the Shumei do not use animal manure and the vegetables still grow. Urban farms in America do not need chickens,
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 25, 2009
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                      Yes, Fukuoka did use chicken manure, but the Shumei do not use animal manure and the vegetables still grow. Urban farms in America do not need chickens, horses, ducks, or cows to farm naturally. The joys of farming without animal manure have been evident at least since the 1950's when vegan growers such as Dalziel O'Brien (England) and Scott Nearing (US) amply demonstrated that system's viability. Cheers to the Shumei  for continuing in this tradition. A Shumei CSA farm near Toyko feeds over 1100 people without using animal manure. See Linda M. Hamilton's recent book "Farming to Create Heaven on Earth" for more examples. One precept of Fukuoka that the Shumei follow strictly is to eat seasonally and not try to force crops to grow out of season by fertilization. The customers/participants who rely on Shumei farms willingly eat whatever the season provides so no pressure is applied to the farmers to do what nature does not want.
                       
                      Bob Monie
                      New Orleans, LA
                      Zone 8  
                       


                      --- On Fri, 9/25/09, Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...> wrote:


                      From: Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...>
                      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Natural Farming in California
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, September 25, 2009, 11:44 AM


                       



                      Fukuoka used animal manure.

                      You can see what is going on in our food forest
                      and get more information about local food security at
                      <http://camaspermacu lture.blogspot. com/> Camas Permaculture

                      Tom Gibson

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