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Moringa sources and experiences

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  • Ryan Platte
    Good day, I remembered that a friend of mine in southern California was talking about growing moringas earlier this year. I asked him about sources, and he
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 27, 2009
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      Good day,
      I remembered that a friend of mine in southern California was talking about
      growing moringas earlier this year. I asked him about sources, and he shared
      that and several of his experiences, encouraging me to pass his message on.

      Ryan Platte
      http://bootstrapacres.com/


      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: Erich Enke <erich.enke@...>
      Date: Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:06 PM
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] FW: [soilandhealth] Re: moringa trees
      To: Ryan Platte <ryan@...>


      The TreesForLife site maintains some links. Seedman is on there.
      http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa/faq/finding-moringa/seeds/finding-moringa-seeds-in-the-united-states

      I got mine from http://www.ilovemoringa.com/. But my story is a
      little more involved. About eight months ago, I ordered two seedlings
      from them. This site is the only one I've found that you can order
      seedlings from. Anyway, it being February, and they coming from
      Florida, the seedlings froze in the mail, lost all their leaves, and
      became withered, dry, dead sticks. ILoveMoringa told me that they're
      amazingly resilient. Just wait. See if they come back. But just in
      case, here's a large bag of seeds to compensate you. I dug out the
      dead seedlings and found a couple bulbs, and planted those in the back
      yard to see if anything would happen, and proceeded with the seeds.

      Now moringa seeds, I've discovered, are some of the most temperamental
      seeds I've ever worked with. Too much water and they rot. Too little
      water and they don't germinate, or (if they have already sprouted)
      they die. When they say, "Use well-draining soil," they mean it. I
      have tried direct sowing (nothing), direct sowing with attentive
      watering (nothing), soak 24 hours then sow (nothing), remove seed
      coats then sow (nothing), scratch seed coats then sow (nothing),
      leaving them in a wet paper towel (nothing, and they rotted), each
      time using five to eight seeds (they gave me a lot of seeds).

      Finally I got them to germinate by following a particular suggestion I
      found online somewhere. I put them in a ziploc completely filled with
      water and threw that into a dark drawer for 24 hours. After the 24
      hours, I took them out, put them into a new, dry ziploc with plenty of
      air in it, and threw them back into the dark. And waited. For three
      to six days. Eventually, the seed coats split open, and then a day or
      two after that, you see a beginning root or leaf.

      After this, I'm not sure really what to do. I've had the most success
      with occasionally running a little water over it, and returning it to
      the drawer until I get a little beginning leaf, and a little green.
      Then I try planting it, after which it usually dies. The most recent
      one actually survived for a little while, but I think I didn't water
      it enough (there's been plenty that I've watered too much). I'm not
      sure if it's actually dead quite yet.

      And then I noticed something just the other day. There's this odd
      thing growing in the middle of my newly-planted strawberry patch.
      Wait... that's where I planted that moringa bulb... Sure enough.
      Little moringa sprout from the bulb. They truly are hardy little
      things once established. Now, if I can just keep it alive... I
      transplanted it into a pot (30% sand 70% loose compost) to take it off
      of the automatic irrigation cycle. It has (I think) gone into
      transplant shock, its leaves yellowing and falling off, but not all of
      them, and it's still putting out some new leaves. So I'm being
      patient, biding my time, and watering it occasionally.

      Moral of the story: my recommendation is, at least at first before
      you're used to dealing with them, buy the seedlings. Getting the
      seeds to establish is really tricky. Some people say you can just
      soak them for 24 hours and then plant them. I haven't had any success
      with that.

      Erich


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Robert Ray
      From what you wrote ... it does seem that a 24 hour soak is essential. I wonder about a 48 hour soak ...?? then planting. ... [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 27, 2009
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        From what you wrote ... it does seem that a 24 hour soak is essential. I
        wonder
        about a 48 hour soak ...?? then planting.

        On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 9:17 AM, Ryan Platte <ryan@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Good day,
        > I remembered that a friend of mine in southern California was talking about
        > growing moringas earlier this year. I asked him about sources, and he
        > shared
        > that and several of his experiences, encouraging me to pass his message on.
        >
        > Ryan Platte
        > http://bootstrapacres.com/
        >
        > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        > From: Erich Enke <erich.enke@... <erich.enke%40gmail.com>>
        > Date: Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:06 PM
        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] FW: [soilandhealth] Re: moringa trees
        > To: Ryan Platte <ryan@... <ryan%40platte.name>>
        >
        > The TreesForLife site maintains some links. Seedman is on there.
        >
        > http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa/faq/finding-moringa/seeds/finding-moringa-seeds-in-the-united-states
        >
        > I got mine from http://www.ilovemoringa.com/. But my story is a
        > little more involved. About eight months ago, I ordered two seedlings
        > from them. This site is the only one I've found that you can order
        > seedlings from. Anyway, it being February, and they coming from
        > Florida, the seedlings froze in the mail, lost all their leaves, and
        > became withered, dry, dead sticks. ILoveMoringa told me that they're
        > amazingly resilient. Just wait. See if they come back. But just in
        > case, here's a large bag of seeds to compensate you. I dug out the
        > dead seedlings and found a couple bulbs, and planted those in the back
        > yard to see if anything would happen, and proceeded with the seeds.
        >
        > Now moringa seeds, I've discovered, are some of the most temperamental
        > seeds I've ever worked with. Too much water and they rot. Too little
        > water and they don't germinate, or (if they have already sprouted)
        > they die. When they say, "Use well-draining soil," they mean it. I
        > have tried direct sowing (nothing), direct sowing with attentive
        > watering (nothing), soak 24 hours then sow (nothing), remove seed
        > coats then sow (nothing), scratch seed coats then sow (nothing),
        > leaving them in a wet paper towel (nothing, and they rotted), each
        > time using five to eight seeds (they gave me a lot of seeds).
        >
        > Finally I got them to germinate by following a particular suggestion I
        > found online somewhere. I put them in a ziploc completely filled with
        > water and threw that into a dark drawer for 24 hours. After the 24
        > hours, I took them out, put them into a new, dry ziploc with plenty of
        > air in it, and threw them back into the dark. And waited. For three
        > to six days. Eventually, the seed coats split open, and then a day or
        > two after that, you see a beginning root or leaf.
        >
        > After this, I'm not sure really what to do. I've had the most success
        > with occasionally running a little water over it, and returning it to
        > the drawer until I get a little beginning leaf, and a little green.
        > Then I try planting it, after which it usually dies. The most recent
        > one actually survived for a little while, but I think I didn't water
        > it enough (there's been plenty that I've watered too much). I'm not
        > sure if it's actually dead quite yet.
        >
        > And then I noticed something just the other day. There's this odd
        > thing growing in the middle of my newly-planted strawberry patch.
        > Wait... that's where I planted that moringa bulb... Sure enough.
        > Little moringa sprout from the bulb. They truly are hardy little
        > things once established. Now, if I can just keep it alive... I
        > transplanted it into a pot (30% sand 70% loose compost) to take it off
        > of the automatic irrigation cycle. It has (I think) gone into
        > transplant shock, its leaves yellowing and falling off, but not all of
        > them, and it's still putting out some new leaves. So I'm being
        > patient, biding my time, and watering it occasionally.
        >
        > Moral of the story: my recommendation is, at least at first before
        > you're used to dealing with them, buy the seedlings. Getting the
        > seeds to establish is really tricky. Some people say you can just
        > soak them for 24 hours and then plant them. I haven't had any success
        > with that.
        >
        > Erich
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ryan Platte
        ... to rot with a longer soak time. Your mileage may vary. ... Ryan ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 27, 2009
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          I passed this question on to my friend Erich. His reply:

          > I've tried longer soaks. With the seeds I have, they were more likely

          to rot with a longer soak time. Your mileage may vary.


          > Erich


          Ryan


          On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 3:19 PM, Robert Ray <atruefriend@...> wrote:

          > From what you wrote ... it does seem that a 24 hour soak is essential. I
          > wonder
          > about a 48 hour soak ...?? then planting.
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert Ray
          Thanks ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 27, 2009
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            Thanks

            On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 2:03 PM, Ryan Platte <ryan@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > I passed this question on to my friend Erich. His reply:
            >
            > > I've tried longer soaks. With the seeds I have, they were more likely
            >
            > to rot with a longer soak time. Your mileage may vary.
            >
            > > Erich
            >
            > Ryan
            >
            >
            > On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 3:19 PM, Robert Ray <atruefriend@...<atruefriend%40gmail.com>>
            > wrote:
            >
            > > From what you wrote ... it does seem that a 24 hour soak is essential. I
            > > wonder
            > > about a 48 hour soak ...?? then planting.
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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