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9060Re: Wood chips as mulch

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  • mcavincheyfrank
    Feb 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear sirs,

      It would seem to me that the fact that many forests have super fertile
      top soils that are many feet deep could possibly be that multitudes of
      leaves, sticks, branches, trunks, etc., have fallen undisturbed over
      millenia. I fail to see how adding wood chips to soils could possibly
      decrease the fertility of soils, unless one has been adding chemical
      fertilizers for quite some time, resulting in dead soils. Perhaps I'm
      mistaken?

      Frank



      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Chandrakant Deokar
      <cdeokar@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Jeremy,
      >
      > I think woody material contains high amount of cellulose. It
      decomposes very
      > slowly and after decomposition that releases toxic acids that can be
      > problematic to the plants.. I dont know the specific names of these
      acids.
      > but hope this will give some directions to your thoughts
      >
      > Chandrakant Deokar
      > Pune India
      >
      > On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 11:04 PM, jhereg9333 <jhereg9333@...> wrote:
      >
      > > If I recall correctly, woody material has such a high carbon
      content
      > > that it ties up nitrogen unless broken down by fungi. As already
      > > mentioned, you can bury the material to help it decompose. You
      could
      > > also spread the chips out and innoculate with fungi spores. You
      may
      > > want to try Stropharia rugoso-annulata or Pleurotus species.
      > >
      > > Jeremy
      > >
      > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > "Lawrence Haftl"
      > > <lawrence@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > David,
      > > >
      > > > I can't remember exactly why using wood chips for mulch are
      > > problematical but I think it has something to do with absorbing
      > > nutrients in the soil to break down/decompose the chips. Fukuoka
      used
      > > wood chips, branches, tree trunks by burying them in his orchard
      to
      > > provide long-term organic matter for the orange trees he planted.
      > > >
      > > > Larry
      > > > http://fukuokafarmingol.info
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: david.keltie@
      > > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 7:56 AM
      > > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Wood chips as mulch
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > An electricity supply company have been clearing overhead supply
      > > lines
      > > > locally so I now have a very large mound of wood/leaf shreddings
      > > > available.
      > > >
      > > > Shreddings appear to mainly composed of cypress (x
      Cupressocyparis
      > > > leylandii). Anything to be wary of in using the shreddings as a
      > > mulch
      > > > in a vegetable/fruit garden? (I usually use straw - I wonder
      about
      > > > them raising the acidity of the soil excessively.)
      > > >
      > > > Thanks, David
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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