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7028Re: Chickens???

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  • robin
    Feb 1, 2008
      dear kim,

      you have some good points. i guess when i say "modern" i mean
      mass-produced, confined, commercial farming for profit, high yields on
      a small space of land...that doesn't
      sound like your farm. no fault can be found with keeping animals
      out of love and joy and you have a trusting relationship going with
      your animals.
      and yes, the most modern version of going back to the land,
      permaculture-related, is headed in a much more natural direction,
      that's true.

      i couldn't call my grandpa's farm truly natural, it was more a
      traditional, old-school family farm, we all ate chicken, yet it was as
      close
      to natural as i've ever experienced. his farm was tucked in the mountains,
      very rural; he had a large number of various fowl, but enough space for
      them all, and very diverse vegetation and hiding places for them to
      choose. and he let them be half-wild.

      i think what fukuoka-san is trying to say is in order to raise natural
      chickens or other fowl, they should not be confined in any way. in
      fact, he wrote

      "if poultry and livestock are to truly benefit man, they must be
      capable of feeding and fending for themselves under the open sky. only
      then will food become naturally plentiful and contribute to man's
      well-being".

      fukuoka-san had chickens and ducks and let them grow up among the
      vegetables
      and grains and revert back to half-wild. when he could no longer keep
      them in that way because of a highway, he stopped keeping them.

      in regard to meat-eating, fukuoka-san wrote of an application his
      friend george ohsawaw had worked out;

      "meat is yang and vegetables yin, with grains in between. because man
      is an omnivorous animal that is yang, this leads to a set of
      principles which says that, when grains, which are intermediate, are
      eaten as the staple, yin vegetables should be consumed and meat (very
      yang)--consumption of which is essentially cannabalism--should be
      avoided."

      yet fukuoka-san was more tolerant and neutral than that. although
      completely or mainly
      vegetarian himself, he did not delve into scientific analysis about
      it, considering such an analysis pointed away from non-active nature
      and into discriminating knowledge. i guess that's my cue to follow his
      lead.

      ***robin***

      p.s.after all my words going on and on i found a quote that says it all;

      find the shortest, simplest way between the earth, the hands, and the
      mouth.---lanza del vasto









      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Garth & Kim Travis
      <gartht@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings,
      > Please define 'modern'. If you mean the factory farm, then it has been
      > in production for many years and is considered the tried, true, old
      > fashioned way of farming.
      >
      > If you mean the new, modern, feed the soil not the plants, natural
      diets
      > for all, then you are very far off the mark. Many people that are
      > raising animals today do so for spiritual values, not greed.
      >
      > There are many metabolic types of humans, and some can not survive on a
      > vegetarian diet, let alone a vegan diet. To them, that is very poor
      > health. This is especially true of people with very northern heredity,
      > from cultures that traditionally only ate meat.
      >
      > There is a real joy in healing the land, saving animals that are on the
      > endangered species list and providing good, healthy natural food for
      > people who appreciate it. No greed involved.
      >
      > Bright Blessings,
      > Kim
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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