Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

4203Re: [fukuoka_farming] A New Book Argues That Agriculture Is a Disaster

Expand Messages
  • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
    May 31, 2004
      > Quick question: If we go back to hunter gathering, can we feed the entire
      > world population?
      >
      > Or do we need agriculture?

      quick answer .
      the world population is in proportion of available foods , when hunting
      gathering was the way to get food , earth had a certain number of peoples
      that could be supported , agriculture is in fact the cause of
      overpopulation .
      the real question is: do we need to continuouslly produce more foods to the
      point of exhausting the soils and compromising biodiversity , so we can give
      birth to more peoples .? when is it going to stop ?

      grain based diet will be fine except that the health status of humanity
      declined drastically with the introduction of grains (stature and brain
      sized diminished , degenerative diseases and tooth decay appeared , big
      scale violence got established etc... and more there is peoples on earth
      with a physiological sense of lack ( due to malnutrition ), more
      destruction of ecosystems will occur ...

      better get fed properlly ( in accordance with our genetic and evolution )
      and becomes mindfull of human impact on earth as the hunter gatherer "had "
      to.
      having indecent availability of foods makes us mindless about our place in
      the web of life .
      jean-claude
      >
      > E.
      >
      > At 12:26 AM 5/28/04 -0400, you wrote:
      > >FIRST, DO NO FARM
      > >A New Book Argues That Agriculture Is a Disaster
      > >
      > >Enviros are familiar with critiques of large-scale,
      > >chemical-dependent agriculture, but Richard Manning has bigger fish
      > >to fry: In his new book "Against the Grain," Manning argues that
      > >agriculture itself -- the whole shebang -- is a disaster, a
      > >"dangerous and consuming beast of a social system." Hunter-gatherers
      > >not only had more fun, he says, but they were demonstrably healthier.
      > >Agriculture led to a small, rich upper class and a large, unhealthy
      > >laborer class, not to mention endless cycles of famine. Michelle
      > >Nijhuis reviews Manning's provocative new book -- today on the Grist
      > >Magazine website.
      > >
      > >today in Grist: Richard Manning's "Against the Grain" gives farming
      > >a big thumbs-down -- by Michelle Nijhuis
      > ><http://www.gristmagazine.com/books/books052704.asp?source=daily>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Show all 19 messages in this topic