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12863Re: [fukuoka_farming] Moreover ध र्म

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  • Jason Stewart
    Nov 5, 2011
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      According to 'Western' anthropological definitions of farming,
      spontaneous farming, 自然農法 (shizen nōhō) Nature/Spontaneous/Natural Farming in the sense of late master Fukuoka, Masanobu,
      is not agriculture at all.
      The anthropological extensive literature i'm referring to has advanced to the point nowadays that they themselves recognise that western definitions of farming/agriculture are the problem, problematic, and,
      so they move, nowadays, academically–slowly towards the kind of definition of farming which late master Fukuoka Masanobu wrote up, from 70 years ago (1940s).

      On 06/11/2011, at 6:53 AM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

      > Hi Boze,
      > I think in English the nearest equivalent term to how you describe
      > dharma, if you take the English term's philosophical meaning, is *essence*.
      > Essence is what makes a thing be what it is. For example the essence of a
      > chair is to be sat on, etc. etc..the essence of an animal is to be animate,
      > the essence of a man is to be a rational animal. In this acceptation
      > rational is not opposed to irrational but to non-rational or non-reasoning.
      >
      > This is why we have so many interesting discussionsin this group, because
      > we are rational.
      >
      > Happy natural farming! (If ever there is such a thing... because if I take
      > the gist of our exchanges I infer that farming is not natural hehe)
      >
      > RUTHIE
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > 2011/11/5 Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
      >
      >> **
      >>
      >>
      >> Jason !
      >>
      >> This is offtopic to Nf but still intersting.
      >> Dharma is a Sanskrit word and Sanskrit is a lanuage used from time
      >> immemorial.
      >> It is said to be the language of the Gods ( Deva Bhasha ).
      >> The word Dharma has so many menaings according to the context in which it
      >> is used but a broader meaning is "way of living" or " "righteous way of
      >> living " or "its nature" .
      >> A small example:
      >> A tiger chases a deer and the deer seeks asylum with a hermit.
      >> Now think of what happens if the hermit stops the tiger from killing the
      >> deer .
      >> One way he is saving the deer's life but at the same time he interrupts the
      >> way of the tiger in getting its food by killing the deer and make it
      >> starve. If he allows the tiger to have its prey , then he gets the sin of
      >> not protecting the weak .
      >> Killing the deer by tiger is its dharma, but the question of saving or not
      >> saving the deer is debatable to the hermit. But his dharma should be to
      >> protect the weak who had sought asylum and thus the sin of making the tiger
      >> starve wouldn't be on him.
      >>
      >> You can have a broad view of the meaning od dharma in this example. There
      >> can not be a right translation of Sankrit words to English or any other
      >> language. One has to learn it and feel and understand the meaning .
      >>
      >> Boovarahan S
      >> Chennai.
      >> 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
      >>
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
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