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Re: [frozen-assets] freezing gravy

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  • Kelly Holman
    ... Don t you need butter in with the flour? Does this method assume there s fat in the liquid?
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 30, 2008
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      >You can go at it the other way around, too. Have your liquid at boiling
      >temperature. In a separate bowl (I use a glass mixing bowl), mix 1
      >tablespoon of flour per cup of boiling liquid with enough cold water to make
      >it runny. Be sure to get all the lumps out -- a whisk helps. Then,
      >stirring the boiling liquid constantly, add the flour/water mixture in a
      >slow but steady stream until it's all incorporated. Continue stirring
      >constantly until the gravy is thick.

      Don't you need butter in with the flour? Does this method assume
      there's fat in the liquid?
    • ishirkwork
      Fat is not a necessary ingredient in gravy. Gravy is basically a thickened flavored liquid. You could take water, bouillion of any flavor and flour and end up
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 1, 2008
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        Fat is not a necessary ingredient in gravy. Gravy is basically a
        thickened flavored liquid. You could take water, bouillion of any
        flavor and flour and end up with gravy. Tomato juice thickened with
        cornstarch and flour makes gravy. For more gravy info see:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravy

        --- In frozen-assets@yahoogroups.com, Kelly Holman <kchbulk@...> wrote:
        >
        > Don't you need butter in with the flour? Does this method assume
        > there's fat in the liquid?
        >
      • Meg Justus
        ... Yes. It assumes that what you re thickening is meat juices, which would have at least a little fat in them. Meg
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 1, 2008
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          > Don't you need butter in with the flour? Does this method assume
          > there's fat in the liquid?

          Yes. It assumes that what you're thickening is meat juices, which would
          have at least a little fat in them.

          Meg
        • June
          You can keep a ready made roux for several weeks in a covered container in the fridge taking out what you need each time. If you use it often start with a
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 1, 2008
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            You can keep a ready made roux for several weeks in a covered container
            in the fridge taking out what you need each time. If you use it often
            start with a pound of butter and a pound of flour and just cook it off.
            Then store it - it would also freeze though I wouldn't bother.

            You could finely crumble this roux into to a pot of boiling liquid
            using a strong arm and a big whisk but you do risk lumps, safer the
            other way.
            June


            --- In frozen-assets@yahoogroups.com, Kelly Holman <kchbulk@...> wrote:
            > >Make a roux with butter and plain flour, cook this mixture for at
            least
            > >a minute to avoid a raw flour taste and then use this to thicken your
            > >gravy.
            >
            > Thanks. This requires gradually adding liquid to the roux, not the
            > other way around. (if the liquid is already hot in the pan) If
            > there's a way to add the roux to the liquid, I'd like to hear it.
            >
            > Also, can you freeze roux? I haven't wanted to yet, but it's probably
            > just a matter of time, in my freezer cooking metamorphosis.
            >
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