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Re: [frozen-assets] almond flour

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  • mey653@aol.com
    I d use pecan flour- which from what the locals say here- is just that, ground up fine pieces of pecans. It is generally less expensive then buying them whole
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 31, 2008
      I'd use pecan flour- which from what the locals say here- is just that,
      ground up fine pieces of pecans. It is generally less expensive then buying them
      whole & I usually have to chop anyway- I like it better!

      In a message dated 3/31/2008 11:55:11 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      gypsy3186@... writes:

      Hi all!

      I have a recipe that calls for almond flour. After searching through 2
      towns, I finally found a Bob's Red Mill almond flour - at almost
      $14!!! YIKES! I like Bob's Red Mill stuff, and generally they are
      reasonably priced at about $2-3 per specialty flour package. But
      $14!!!!

      The label states it's only blanched, skinned almonds ground up. I have
      some in the freezer left over from Christmas baking. Since I don't
      know if I'll really like this recipe enough to justify $14 for one
      ingredient (AND the idea behind this particular recipe is SAVING
      money!), I'd like to make it myself. I've never ground my own flour
      before - any tips?? Is there a special mill? Food processor? Coffee
      bean mill? TIA!! HUGS!!

      Debby
      <snip>
    • Jennifer Morgan
      I have ground up almonds before in my food processor. One thing I found that if the almonds are not really dry, when you grind them up, the natural oils cause
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1, 2008
        I have ground up almonds before in my food processor. One thing I found that if the almonds are not really dry, when you grind them up, the natural oils cause the ground up almonds to bind up. It is not a smooth meal that you are looking for. I would suggest very coursely chopping in the food processor and then put them in the oven on low heat to dry out. Once they have dried, grind them in a coffee/spice grinder. You will get a finer grind that way. Hope this helps.

        Jennifer
        Hamilton, OH

        mey653@... wrote:
        I'd use pecan flour- which from what the locals say here- is just that,
        ground up fine pieces of pecans. It is generally less expensive then buying them
        whole & I usually have to chop anyway- I like it better!
        <snip>
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