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Re: N00bs

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  • overgauss
    ... Thanks for your consideration! I eagerly await your reply. I think Frink goes a long way into turning my c1000 into a semi-sentient motherbox. The
    Message 1 of 23 , Sep 6, 2006
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      --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
      >
      > overgauss wrote:
      > > 1) Is there any way someone could whip up a tutorial or two for n00bs
      > > such as myself?
      >
      > Unfortunately, I don't have anything that's just a "quick start"
      > tutorial. I recently gave a presentation which would be considered a
      > tutorial, but it's on video and it's rather long. I'll see if I can
      > whip something up, but for now the documentation is the best resource:
      >
      > http://futureboy.us/frinkdocs/
      >
      > I've seen some other tutuorials made by a college professor about
      > Frink, but I haven't been able to get to them at the moment. I will try
      > to contact him and see if he still has copies.
      >
      > > 2) I use a Zaurus SLC100 and currently don't have internet access on
      > > it. Is there away to get a static image of some datafiles for
      > > language translations and any other data files that would normally be
      > > accessed via the internet?
      >
      > Right now, there is a static file for currency exchange rates that is
      > consulted if you don't have internet access, but no static files for 1.)
      > historical U.S. dollar values, 2.) historical British currency values
      > and 3.) language translations. Updated currency exchange rates are
      > compiled in to the code with each release, more or less.
      >
      > Adding a file for 1.) would be relatively easy, as the file I parse
      > is a single flatfile. Adding a file for 2.) would be considerably
      > harder, as the information is not available in a single file. Adding a
      > static file for language translations is impossible.
      >
      > I'll see what I can do to improve the situation a bit.
      >
      > --
      > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
      > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
      > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
      >

      Thanks for your consideration! I eagerly await your reply. I think
      Frink goes a long way into turning my c1000 into a semi-sentient
      motherbox. The understated power is immense in my opinion. I only
      wish I understood better how to unlock the power within the language.

      Primarily I'm currently interested in historical U.S. dollar values as
      the language translation is impossible and I don't anticipate using
      historical British currency values in the near future. I have already
      cursed the fact that I don't have internet access on the thing while
      watching a cowboy movie and tring to figure out how much 15 dollars
      was in 1913 dollars. Kudos on a fine language!

      Regards,

      O.G.
    • Ed Peschko
      hey all, how flexible is the standard units file that comes with frink? I d like to add other units (mostly to do with energy densities, masses of materials,
      Message 2 of 23 , Sep 7, 2006
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        hey all,

        how flexible is the 'standard' units file that comes with frink? I'd like to add
        other units (mostly to do with energy densities, masses of materials, etc).

        so.. what are the limits on the standard unit set? And is there a possibility of having
        standard distribution 'libraries' which contain more detailed units for a given subject
        (ie: physics, chemistry, etc) that you could require on demand?

        Ed
      • Alan Eliasen
        ... I just added the ability for Frink to read a static file of the Consumer Price Index data for historical U.S. dollar values. If it can t connect to the
        Message 3 of 23 , Sep 7, 2006
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          overgauss wrote:
          > Primarily I'm currently interested in historical U.S. dollar values as
          > the language translation is impossible and I don't anticipate using
          > historical British currency values in the near future. I have already
          > cursed the fact that I don't have internet access on the thing while
          > watching a cowboy movie and tring to figure out how much 15 dollars
          > was in 1913 dollars. Kudos on a fine language!

          I just added the ability for Frink to read a static file of the
          Consumer Price Index data for historical U.S. dollar values. If it
          can't connect to the internet, it will read this internal file and use
          the (possibly older) values distributed with your version of Frink.

          Give it a try. The downloads are available at
          http://futureboy.us/frinkdocs/ as always.

          By the way, thanks for the donation! Greasing palms always helps to
          get new features implemented.

          --
          Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
          eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
          http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
        • overgauss
          ... Certainly! I hope it is of some use to you. Mr. Peschko has me wondering... My goal is to get a degree in Bio-Medical Engineering. I m currently enrolled
          Message 4 of 23 , Sep 7, 2006
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            --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > By the way, thanks for the donation! Greasing palms always helps to
            > get new features implemented.
            >
            > --
            > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
            > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
            > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
            >

            Certainly! I hope it is of some use to you.

            Mr. Peschko has me wondering...

            My goal is to get a degree in Bio-Medical Engineering. I'm currently
            enrolled in College Algebra with trig, pre-calc, calcs I-III,
            engineering physics, diff equations etc to follow as an undergrad. I
            also have several biology and chemistry courses I must take as well.
            Hopefully by the time I get to higher maths I will have gained some
            proficiency in using Frink. So then. With perhaps 'liberal'
            applications of grease would it be possible for Frink to evolve in the
            manner that Mr. Peschko suggested? It would seem that Frink is
            perfectly suited for such things, but then I'm an admitted n00b so
            what do I know.
          • overgauss
            I downloaded the Zaurus .ipk installed it and tested it with 1250 dollar_1987 - dollar. I got an error Uknown symbol dollar and 1250 dollar_1987
            Message 5 of 23 , Sep 8, 2006
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              I downloaded the Zaurus .ipk installed it and tested it with "1250
              dollar_1987 -> dollar. I got an error Uknown symbol "dollar" and
              "1250 dollar_1987 (undefined symbol) -> (undefined symbol). I will
              attempt to use the .jar file and report back if I can figure out how
              to link to the .jar file on my Zaurus.

              Regards,

              O.G.
            • Alan Eliasen
              Sigh. I noticed that yesterday s build of Frink may have been entirely broken. Some files evidently didn t get packaged into the jar file due to a
              Message 6 of 23 , Sep 8, 2006
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                Sigh. I noticed that yesterday's build of Frink may have been
                entirely broken. Some files evidently didn't get packaged into the jar
                file due to a commented-out line in the makefile, and probably prevented
                proper operation.

                If you downloaded Frink within the last 24 hours or so, please
                download it again.

                --
                Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
              • Alan Eliasen
                ... Thanks for the bug report! As I noted in my last e-mail to this list, I believe that yesterday s build was entirely broken. Could you please download and
                Message 7 of 23 , Sep 8, 2006
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                  overgauss wrote:
                  > I downloaded the Zaurus .ipk installed it and tested it with "1250
                  > dollar_1987 -> dollar. I got an error Uknown symbol "dollar" and
                  > "1250 dollar_1987 (undefined symbol) -> (undefined symbol). I will
                  > attempt to use the .jar file and report back if I can figure out how
                  > to link to the .jar file on my Zaurus.

                  Thanks for the bug report! As I noted in my last e-mail to this
                  list, I believe that yesterday's build was entirely broken. Could you
                  please download and try again?

                  I noticed in one of my tests with my network turned off that the JVM
                  seems to be throwing an exception when it's not expected/allowed. Just
                  in the last few minutes, I released another new version that widens the
                  exception catching to attempt to fix this issue. I'd appreciate testing
                  of this version.

                  --
                  Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                  eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                  http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                • overgauss
                  ... Success! Evidently 15 year 1913 dollars equals around 308.33 year 2006 dollars. Much Appreciated. I d be happy to test more functions for you, just give
                  Message 8 of 23 , Sep 9, 2006
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                    --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                    > Could you
                    > please download and try again?
                    >
                    > I noticed in one of my tests with my network turned off that the JVM
                    > seems to be throwing an exception when it's not expected/allowed. Just
                    > in the last few minutes, I released another new version that widens the
                    > exception catching to attempt to fix this issue. I'd appreciate testing
                    > of this version.
                    >
                    > --
                    > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                    > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                    > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                    >
                    Success! Evidently 15 year 1913 dollars equals around 308.33 year 2006
                    dollars. Much Appreciated. I'd be happy to test more functions for
                    you, just give me the word.

                    Regards,
                    O.G.
                  • Alan Eliasen
                    ... The standard units file is quite flexible. Hopefully, you shouldn t have to modify the units in there (unless you re, say, a surveyor and you want the
                    Message 9 of 23 , Sep 10, 2006
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                      Ed Peschko wrote:
                      > how flexible is the 'standard' units file that comes with frink? I'd
                      > like to add other units (mostly to do with energy densities, masses
                      > of materials, etc).

                      The standard units file is quite flexible. Hopefully, you shouldn't
                      have to modify the units in there (unless you're, say, a surveyor and
                      you want the "foot" to mean the "surveyfoot".)

                      It's rather easy to make your own list of additional definitions that
                      will complement the standard distribution. You can then load this file
                      using the

                      -k [filename]

                      switch from the command line, or using the "use file" menu option
                      from the interactive GUI.

                      I'd be happy to add or distribute libraries that you might build.

                      > so.. what are the limits on the standard unit set?

                      There are very few limits. You can even add new base dimensions at
                      runtime. So, if you're working on warp drive physics, and you need to
                      add "cochranes" as a measure of subspace distortion, you can do it.

                      On the other hand, Frink runs on a variety of handheld devices, and
                      one of the things that contributes most to its startup time and memory
                      usage is the size of the standard data file, so I have to consider what
                      units get added somewhat carefully.

                      > And is there a
                      > possibility of having standard distribution 'libraries' which contain
                      > more detailed units for a given subject (ie: physics, chemistry, etc)
                      > that you could require on demand?

                      Absolutely. I recently added the ability to have libraries
                      distributed within the standard distribution. At the moment, there
                      aren't any, but I'll add them as they get good enough (and if they're
                      not too big.) For the moment, I just have them downloadable from the
                      web site.

                      Some of the big questions are:

                      1.) Do these get written in an object-oriented fashion? For example,
                      if we want to store the properties of Carbon, it might have a density, a
                      number of protons and neutrons, etc., all of which may vary. (They may
                      vary by isotope, or by temperature and pressure, or by allotropic form
                      such as graphite or diamonds or buckyballs. Getting properties of these
                      objects might have to be represented by functions.) Do we do this as
                      new units such as "uraniumdensity" or as properties of an object like
                      Uranium which is an instance of ... uh... what class? What should the
                      inheritance hierarchy look like, if there is one?

                      Since I haven't fully implemented inheritance, there's necessarily
                      some delay in doing that. :)

                      2.) How stable and good do the libraries have to be to be allowed into
                      the standard distribution?

                      3.) Should we have an external repository of libraries and a tool to
                      download these files like Perl's CPAN or yum or apt-get? Should these
                      be downloaded on a user-by-user basis or for the whole machine? Should
                      they be downloaded on first request?

                      Sometimes I look at the whole CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics
                      and despair at how much effort it'll take to get all of that into Frink,
                      but hopefully it'll happen someday.

                      If someone has libraries to contribute, or would like some help in
                      designing them, please let me know!

                      --
                      Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                      eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                      http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                    • overgauss
                      ... I would like to contribute, but I don t know where to start. Are we talking about parsing text files for data, hand input, or a combination of both? Since
                      Message 10 of 23 , Sep 10, 2006
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                        --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > If someone has libraries to contribute, or would like some help in
                        > designing them, please let me know!
                        >
                        > --
                        > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                        > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                        > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                        >

                        I would like to contribute, but I don't know where to start. Are we
                        talking about parsing text files for data, hand input, or a
                        combination of both?

                        Since I need to take chemistry next semester perhaps I could start
                        small with a periodic table of elements. Or something of its
                        equivalent in biology.

                        I'm in awe of Frink and truly wish to contribute, however I am
                        handicapped by my technical inexperience. So then, If someone can
                        point me in a direction, somewhat of a babystep direction perhaps, I
                        can get on it right away!
                      • Alan Eliasen
                        ... I ve imported data by parsing text files, or typing in text by hand, or dictating in tables of numbers with a voice dictation program. As long as the
                        Message 11 of 23 , Sep 13, 2006
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                          > --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                          >> If someone has libraries to contribute, or would like some help in
                          >>designing them, please let me know!

                          overgauss wrote:
                          > I would like to contribute, but I don't know where to start. Are we
                          > talking about parsing text files for data, hand input, or a
                          > combination of both?

                          I've imported data by parsing text files, or typing in text by hand,
                          or dictating in tables of numbers with a voice dictation program. As
                          long as the process doesn't introduce errors, anything is fine!

                          The important thing is that the source is authoritative and correct.
                          I've worked very hard to ensure that data comes from the most
                          authoritative and up-to-date sources, such as NIST or CODATA or the IAU,
                          etc. You'll find in many, many data sources that you have no idea how
                          many digits are significant, if the figures are exact or approximate, etc.

                          > Since I need to take chemistry next semester perhaps I could start
                          > small with a periodic table of elements. Or something of its
                          > equivalent in biology.

                          A periodic table would be great! I think that it would likely be
                          best to have a periodic table as an object. The difficulty is
                          determining what that object should look like.

                          For example, a simple class might look something like:

                          class Element
                          {
                          var symbol

                          var name

                          var protons

                          var atomicMass is mass

                          // Constructor, creates a new element
                          new[eSymbol, eName, eProtons, eMass] :=
                          {
                          symbol = eSymbol
                          name = eName
                          protons = eProtons
                          mass = eMass
                          }

                          class var Hydrogen = new Element["H", "Hydrogen", 1, 1.00794 u]
                          class var Helium = new Element["He", "Helium", 2, 4.002602 u]
                          }

                          Then items can be accessed as Element.Helium (maybe a little
                          verbose.) Defining each element outside the class (without the "class
                          var") would allow you to just write "Hydrogen", but that would be a
                          local variable, not a global one, and wouldn't be accessible from within
                          functions. Frink doesn't have global variables, but class declarations
                          are global.

                          Now what do we do about different isotopes, etc?

                          --
                          Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                          eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                          http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                        • Alan Eliasen
                          ... [snip] It would be nice if I actually tested code samples before posting them, wouldn t it? There was a dumb mistake in there and one more subtle issue. A
                          Message 12 of 23 , Sep 14, 2006
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                            Alan Eliasen wrote:
                            > For example, a simple class might look something like:
                            >
                            > class Element
                            > {
                            [snip]

                            It would be nice if I actually tested code samples before posting
                            them, wouldn't it? There was a dumb mistake in there and one more
                            subtle issue.

                            A working version is available here:

                            http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink

                            or here:

                            http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink

                            Keep in mind that this is just a prototype. I think that a real
                            version would have a factory method to create new elements and add them
                            to various dictionaries so you could look them up by name, or atomic
                            number, or iterate through all the elements, etc.

                            --
                            Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                            eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                            http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                          • overgauss
                            ... Here s a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for uncertainty levels I
                            Message 13 of 23 , Sep 14, 2006
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                              --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Alan Eliasen wrote:
                              > > For example, a simple class might look something like:
                              > >
                              > > class Element
                              > > {
                              > [snip]
                              >
                              > It would be nice if I actually tested code samples before posting
                              > them, wouldn't it? There was a dumb mistake in there and one more
                              > subtle issue.
                              >
                              > A working version is available here:
                              >
                              > http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink
                              >
                              > or here:
                              >
                              > http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink
                              >
                              > Keep in mind that this is just a prototype. I think that a real
                              > version would have a factory method to create new elements and add them
                              > to various dictionaries so you could look them up by name, or atomic
                              > number, or iterate through all the elements, etc.
                              >
                              > --
                              > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                              > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                              > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                              >


                              Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                              any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                              uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                              after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                              half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                              have the u replaced with an h for half life.
                              >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                              class Element
                              {
                              var symbol
                              var name
                              var protons
                              var atomicMass

                              //Constructor, creates a new element
                              new[eSymbol, eName, eProtons, eMass is mass] :=
                              {
                              symbol = eSymbol
                              name = eName
                              protons = eProtons
                              atomicMass = eMass
                              }
                              class var Hydrogen = new Element["H", "Hydrogen", 1, 1.00794 u7]
                              class var Helium = new Element["He", "Helium", 2, 4.002602 u2]
                              class var Lithium = new Element["Li", "Lithium", 3, 6.941 u2]
                              class var Beryllium = new Element["Be", "Beryllium", 4, 9.012182 u3]
                              class var Boron = new Element["B", "Boron", 5, 10.811 u7]
                              class var Carbon = new Element["C", "Carbon", 6, 12.0107 u8]
                              class var Nitrogen = new Element["N", "Nitrogen", 7, 14.0067 u2]
                              class var Oxygen = new Element["O", "Oxygen", 8, 15.9994 u3]
                              class var Fluorine = new Element["F", "Fluorine", 9, 18.9984032 u5]
                              class var Neon = new Element["Ne", "Neon", 10, 20.1797 u6]
                              class var Sodium = new Element["Na", "Sodium", 11, 22.98976928 u2]
                              class var Magnesium = new Element["Mg", "Magnesium", 12, 24.3050 u6]
                              class var Aluminium = new Element["Al", "Aluminium", 13, 26.9815386 u8]
                              class var Silicon = new Element["Si", "Silicon", 14, 28.0855 u3]
                              class var Phosphorus = new Element["P", "Phosphorus", 15, 30.973762 u2]
                              class var Sulfur = new Element["S", "Sulfur", 16, 32.065 u5]
                              class var Chlorine = new Element["Cl", "Chlorine", 17, 35.453 u2]
                              class var Argon = new Element["Ar", "Argon", 18, 39.948 u1]
                              class var Potassium = new Element["K", "Potassium", 19, 39.0983 u1]
                              class var Calcium = new Element["Ca", "Calcium", 20, 40.078 u4]
                              class var Scandium = new Element["Sc", "Scandium", 21, 44.955912 u6]
                              class var Titanium = new Element["Ti", "Titanium", 22, 47.867 u1]
                              class var Vanadium = new Element["V", "Vanadium", 23, 50.9415 u1]
                              class var Chromium = new Element["Cr", "Chromium", 24, 51.9961 u6]
                              class var Manganese = new Element["Mn", "Manganese", 25, 54.938045 u5]
                              class var Iron = new Element["Fe", "Iron", 26, 55.845 u2]
                              class var Cobalt = new Element["Co", "Cobalt", 27, 58.933195 u5]
                              class var Nickel = new Element["Ni", "Nickel", 28, 58.6934 u2]
                              class var Copper = new Element["Cu", "Copper", 29, 63.546 u3]
                              class var Zinc = new Element["Zn", "Zinc", 30, 65.409 u4]
                              class var Gallium = new Element["Ga", "Gallium", 31, 69.723 u1]
                              class var Germanium = new Element["Ge","Germanium", 32, 72.64 u1]
                              class var Arsenic = new Element["As", "Arsenic", 33, 74.92160 u2]
                              class var Selenium = new Element["Se", "Selenium", 34, 78.96 u3]
                              class var Bromine = new Element["Br", "Bromine", 35, 79.904 u1]
                              class var Krypton = new Element["Kr", "Krypton", 36, 83.798 u2]
                              class var Rubidium = new Element["Rb", "Rubidium", 37, 85.4678 u3]
                              class var Strontium = new Element["Sr", "Strontium", 38, 87.62 u1]
                              class var Yttrium = new Element["Y", "Yttrium", 39, 88.90585 u2]
                              class var Zirconium = new Element["Zr", "Zirconium", 40, 91.224 u2]
                              class var Niobium = new Element["Nb", "Niobium", 41, 92.90638 u2]
                              class var Molybdenum = new Element["Mo", "Molybdenum", 42, 95.94 u2]
                              class var Technetium = new Element["Tc", "Technetium", 43, 97.9072 h]
                              class var Ruthenium = new Element["Ru", "Ruthenium", 44, 101.07 u2]
                              class var Rhodium = new Element["Rh", "Rhodium", 45, 102.90550 u2]
                              class var Palladium = new Element["Pd", "Palladium", 46, 106.42 u1]
                              class var Silver = new Element["Ag", "Silver", 47, 107.8682 u2]
                              class var Cadmium = new Element["Cd", "Cadmium", 48, 112.411 u8]
                              class var Indium = new Element["In", "Indium", 49, 114.818 u3]
                              class var Tin = new Element["Sn", "Tin", 50, 118.710 u7]
                              class var Antimony = new Element["Sb", "Antimony", 51, 121.760 u1]
                              class var Tellurium = new Element["Te", "Tellurium", 52, 127.60 u3]
                              class var Iodine = new Element["I", "Iodine", 53, 126.90447 u3]
                              class var Xenon = new Element["Xe", "Xenon", 54, 131.293 u6]
                              class var Caesium = new Element["Cs", "Caesium", 55, 132.9054519 u2]
                              class var Barium = new Element["Ba", "Barium", 56, 137.327 u7]
                              class var Lanthanum = new Element["La", "Lanthanum", 57, 138.90547 u7]
                              class var Cerium = new Element["Ce", "Cerium", 58, 140.116 u1]
                              class var Praseodymium = new Element["Pr", "Praseodymium", 59,
                              140.90765 u2]
                              class var Neodymium = new Element["Nd", "Neodymium", 60, 144.242 u3]
                              class var Promethium = new Element["Pm", "Promethium", 61, 145 h]
                              class var Samarium = new Element["Sm", "Samarium", 62, 150.36 u2]
                              class var Europium = new Element["Eu", "Europium", 63, 151.964 u1]
                              class var Gadolinium = new Element["Gd", "Gadolinium", 64, 157.25 u3]
                              class var Terbium = new Element["Tb", "Terbium", 65, 158.92535 u2]
                              class var Dysprosium = new Element["Dy", "Dysprosium", 66, 162.500 u1]
                              class var Holmium = new Element["Ho", "Holmium", 67, 164.93032 u2]
                              class var Erbium = new Element["Er", "Erbium", 68, 167.259 u3]
                              class var Thulium = new Element["Tm", "Thulium", 69, 168.93421 u2]
                              class var Ytterbium = new Element["Yb", "Ytterbium", 70, 173.04 u3]
                              class var Lutetium = new Element["Lu", "Lutetium", 71, 174.967 u1]
                              class var Hafnium = new Element["Hf", "Hafnium", 72, 178.49 u2]
                              class var Tantalum = new Element["Ta", "Tantalum", 73, 180.94788 u2]
                              class var Tungsten = new Element["W", "Tungsten", 74, 183.84 u1]
                              class var Rhenium = new Element["Re", "Rhenium", 75, 186.207 u1]
                              class var Osmium = new Element["Os", "Osmium", 76, 190.23 u3]
                              class var Iridium = new Element["Ir", "Iridium", 77, 192.084 u9]
                              class var Platinum = new Element["Pt", "Platinum", 78, 195.084 u9]
                              class var Gold = new Element["Au", "Gold", 79, 196.9665694 u4]
                              class var Mercury = new Element["Hg", "Mercury", 80, 200.59 u2]
                              class var Thallium = new Element["Tl", "Thallium", 81, 204.3833 u2]
                              class var Lead = new Element["Pb", "Lead", 82, 207.2 u1]
                              class var Bismuth = new Element["Bi", "Bismuth", 83, 208.98040 u1]
                              class var Polonium = new Element["Po", "Polonium", 84, 208.9824 h]
                              class var Astatine = new Element["At", "Astatine", 85, 209.9871 h]
                              class var Radon = new Element["Rn", "Radon", 86, 222.016 h]
                              class var Francium = new Element["Fr", "Francium", 87, 223 h]
                              class var Radium = new Element["Ra", "Radium", 88, 226 h]
                              class var Actinium = new Element["Ac", "Actinium", 89, 227 h]
                              class var Thorium = new Element["Th", "Thorium", 90, 232.03806 u2]
                              class var Protactinium = new Element["Pa", "Protactinium", 91,
                              231.03588 u2]
                              class var Uranium = new Element["U", "Uranium", 92, 238.02891 u3]
                              class var Neptunium = new Element["Np", "Neptunium", 93, 237 h]
                              class var Plutonium = new Element["Pu", "Plutonium", 94, 244 h]
                              class var Americium = new Element["Am", "Americium", 95, 243 h]
                              class var Curium = new Element["Cm", "Curium", 96, 247 h]
                              class var Berkelium = new Element["Bk", "Berkelium", 97, 247 h]
                              class var Californium = new Element["Cf", "Californium", 98, 251 h]
                              class var Einsteinum = new Element["Es", "Einsteinum", 99, 252 h]
                              class var Fermium = new Element["Fm", "Fermium", 100, 257 h]
                              class var Mendelevium = new Element["Md", "Mendelevium", 101, 258 h]
                              class var Nobelium = new Element["No", "Nobelium", 102, 259 h]
                              class var Lawrencium = new Element["Lr", "Lawrencium", 103, 262 h]
                              class var Rutherfordium = new Element["Rf", "Rutherfordium", 104, 261 h]
                              class var Dubnium = new Element["Db", "Dubnium", 105, 262 h]
                              class var Seaborgium = new Element["Sg", "Seaborgium", 106, 266 h]
                              class var Bohrium = new Element["Bh", "Bohrium", 107, 264 h]
                              class var Hassium = new Element["Hs", "Hassium", 108, 277 h]
                              class var Meitnerium = new Element["Mt", "Meitnerium", 109, 268 h]
                              class var Darmstadtium = new Element["Ds", "Darmstadtium", 110, 271 h]
                              class var Roentgenium = new Element["Rg", "Roentgenium", 111, 272 h]
                              }


                              >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                              Regards,

                              O.G.
                            • overgauss
                              ... them ... Corrected mistakes with Iridium, Gold and Radon. Damn my eyes!
                              Message 14 of 23 , Sep 14, 2006
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                                --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, "overgauss" <overgauss@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Alan Eliasen wrote:
                                > > > For example, a simple class might look something like:
                                > > >
                                > > > class Element
                                > > > {
                                > > [snip]
                                > >
                                > > It would be nice if I actually tested code samples before posting
                                > > them, wouldn't it? There was a dumb mistake in there and one more
                                > > subtle issue.
                                > >
                                > > A working version is available here:
                                > >
                                > > http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink
                                > >
                                > > or here:
                                > >
                                > > http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink
                                > >
                                > > Keep in mind that this is just a prototype. I think that a real
                                > > version would have a factory method to create new elements and add
                                them
                                > > to various dictionaries so you could look them up by name, or atomic
                                > > number, or iterate through all the elements, etc.
                                > >
                                > > --
                                > > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                > > eliasen@ | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                > > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                > >
                                >
                                >
                                > Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                > any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                > uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                                > after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                > half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                > have the u replaced with an h for half life.
                                > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                                >
                                > class Element
                                > {
                                > var symbol
                                > var name
                                > var protons
                                > var atomicMass
                                >
                                > //Constructor, creates a new element
                                > new[eSymbol, eName, eProtons, eMass is mass] :=
                                > {
                                > symbol = eSymbol
                                > name = eName
                                > protons = eProtons
                                > atomicMass = eMass
                                > }
                                > class var Hydrogen = new Element["H", "Hydrogen", 1, 1.00794 u7]
                                > class var Helium = new Element["He", "Helium", 2, 4.002602 u2]
                                > class var Lithium = new Element["Li", "Lithium", 3, 6.941 u2]
                                > class var Beryllium = new Element["Be", "Beryllium", 4, 9.012182 u3]
                                > class var Boron = new Element["B", "Boron", 5, 10.811 u7]
                                > class var Carbon = new Element["C", "Carbon", 6, 12.0107 u8]
                                > class var Nitrogen = new Element["N", "Nitrogen", 7, 14.0067 u2]
                                > class var Oxygen = new Element["O", "Oxygen", 8, 15.9994 u3]
                                > class var Fluorine = new Element["F", "Fluorine", 9, 18.9984032 u5]
                                > class var Neon = new Element["Ne", "Neon", 10, 20.1797 u6]
                                > class var Sodium = new Element["Na", "Sodium", 11, 22.98976928 u2]
                                > class var Magnesium = new Element["Mg", "Magnesium", 12, 24.3050 u6]
                                > class var Aluminium = new Element["Al", "Aluminium", 13, 26.9815386 u8]
                                > class var Silicon = new Element["Si", "Silicon", 14, 28.0855 u3]
                                > class var Phosphorus = new Element["P", "Phosphorus", 15, 30.973762 u2]
                                > class var Sulfur = new Element["S", "Sulfur", 16, 32.065 u5]
                                > class var Chlorine = new Element["Cl", "Chlorine", 17, 35.453 u2]
                                > class var Argon = new Element["Ar", "Argon", 18, 39.948 u1]
                                > class var Potassium = new Element["K", "Potassium", 19, 39.0983 u1]
                                > class var Calcium = new Element["Ca", "Calcium", 20, 40.078 u4]
                                > class var Scandium = new Element["Sc", "Scandium", 21, 44.955912 u6]
                                > class var Titanium = new Element["Ti", "Titanium", 22, 47.867 u1]
                                > class var Vanadium = new Element["V", "Vanadium", 23, 50.9415 u1]
                                > class var Chromium = new Element["Cr", "Chromium", 24, 51.9961 u6]
                                > class var Manganese = new Element["Mn", "Manganese", 25, 54.938045 u5]
                                > class var Iron = new Element["Fe", "Iron", 26, 55.845 u2]
                                > class var Cobalt = new Element["Co", "Cobalt", 27, 58.933195 u5]
                                > class var Nickel = new Element["Ni", "Nickel", 28, 58.6934 u2]
                                > class var Copper = new Element["Cu", "Copper", 29, 63.546 u3]
                                > class var Zinc = new Element["Zn", "Zinc", 30, 65.409 u4]
                                > class var Gallium = new Element["Ga", "Gallium", 31, 69.723 u1]
                                > class var Germanium = new Element["Ge","Germanium", 32, 72.64 u1]
                                > class var Arsenic = new Element["As", "Arsenic", 33, 74.92160 u2]
                                > class var Selenium = new Element["Se", "Selenium", 34, 78.96 u3]
                                > class var Bromine = new Element["Br", "Bromine", 35, 79.904 u1]
                                > class var Krypton = new Element["Kr", "Krypton", 36, 83.798 u2]
                                > class var Rubidium = new Element["Rb", "Rubidium", 37, 85.4678 u3]
                                > class var Strontium = new Element["Sr", "Strontium", 38, 87.62 u1]
                                > class var Yttrium = new Element["Y", "Yttrium", 39, 88.90585 u2]
                                > class var Zirconium = new Element["Zr", "Zirconium", 40, 91.224 u2]
                                > class var Niobium = new Element["Nb", "Niobium", 41, 92.90638 u2]
                                > class var Molybdenum = new Element["Mo", "Molybdenum", 42, 95.94 u2]
                                > class var Technetium = new Element["Tc", "Technetium", 43, 97.9072 h]
                                > class var Ruthenium = new Element["Ru", "Ruthenium", 44, 101.07 u2]
                                > class var Rhodium = new Element["Rh", "Rhodium", 45, 102.90550 u2]
                                > class var Palladium = new Element["Pd", "Palladium", 46, 106.42 u1]
                                > class var Silver = new Element["Ag", "Silver", 47, 107.8682 u2]
                                > class var Cadmium = new Element["Cd", "Cadmium", 48, 112.411 u8]
                                > class var Indium = new Element["In", "Indium", 49, 114.818 u3]
                                > class var Tin = new Element["Sn", "Tin", 50, 118.710 u7]
                                > class var Antimony = new Element["Sb", "Antimony", 51, 121.760 u1]
                                > class var Tellurium = new Element["Te", "Tellurium", 52, 127.60 u3]
                                > class var Iodine = new Element["I", "Iodine", 53, 126.90447 u3]
                                > class var Xenon = new Element["Xe", "Xenon", 54, 131.293 u6]
                                > class var Caesium = new Element["Cs", "Caesium", 55, 132.9054519 u2]
                                > class var Barium = new Element["Ba", "Barium", 56, 137.327 u7]
                                > class var Lanthanum = new Element["La", "Lanthanum", 57, 138.90547 u7]
                                > class var Cerium = new Element["Ce", "Cerium", 58, 140.116 u1]
                                > class var Praseodymium = new Element["Pr", "Praseodymium", 59,
                                > 140.90765 u2]
                                > class var Neodymium = new Element["Nd", "Neodymium", 60, 144.242 u3]
                                > class var Promethium = new Element["Pm", "Promethium", 61, 145 h]
                                > class var Samarium = new Element["Sm", "Samarium", 62, 150.36 u2]
                                > class var Europium = new Element["Eu", "Europium", 63, 151.964 u1]
                                > class var Gadolinium = new Element["Gd", "Gadolinium", 64, 157.25 u3]
                                > class var Terbium = new Element["Tb", "Terbium", 65, 158.92535 u2]
                                > class var Dysprosium = new Element["Dy", "Dysprosium", 66, 162.500 u1]
                                > class var Holmium = new Element["Ho", "Holmium", 67, 164.93032 u2]
                                > class var Erbium = new Element["Er", "Erbium", 68, 167.259 u3]
                                > class var Thulium = new Element["Tm", "Thulium", 69, 168.93421 u2]
                                > class var Ytterbium = new Element["Yb", "Ytterbium", 70, 173.04 u3]
                                > class var Lutetium = new Element["Lu", "Lutetium", 71, 174.967 u1]
                                > class var Hafnium = new Element["Hf", "Hafnium", 72, 178.49 u2]
                                > class var Tantalum = new Element["Ta", "Tantalum", 73, 180.94788 u2]
                                > class var Tungsten = new Element["W", "Tungsten", 74, 183.84 u1]
                                > class var Rhenium = new Element["Re", "Rhenium", 75, 186.207 u1]
                                > class var Osmium = new Element["Os", "Osmium", 76, 190.23 u3]
                                > class var Iridium = new Element["Ir", "Iridium", 77, 192.217 u3]
                                > class var Platinum = new Element["Pt", "Platinum", 78, 195.084 u9]
                                > class var Gold = new Element["Au", "Gold", 79, 196.966569 u4]
                                > class var Mercury = new Element["Hg", "Mercury", 80, 200.59 u2]
                                > class var Thallium = new Element["Tl", "Thallium", 81, 204.3833 u2]
                                > class var Lead = new Element["Pb", "Lead", 82, 207.2 u1]
                                > class var Bismuth = new Element["Bi", "Bismuth", 83, 208.98040 u1]
                                > class var Polonium = new Element["Po", "Polonium", 84, 208.9824 h]
                                > class var Astatine = new Element["At", "Astatine", 85, 209.9871 h]
                                > class var Radon = new Element["Rn", "Radon", 86, 222.0176 h]
                                > class var Francium = new Element["Fr", "Francium", 87, 223 h]
                                > class var Radium = new Element["Ra", "Radium", 88, 226 h]
                                > class var Actinium = new Element["Ac", "Actinium", 89, 227 h]
                                > class var Thorium = new Element["Th", "Thorium", 90, 232.03806 u2]
                                > class var Protactinium = new Element["Pa", "Protactinium", 91,
                                > 231.03588 u2]
                                > class var Uranium = new Element["U", "Uranium", 92, 238.02891 u3]
                                > class var Neptunium = new Element["Np", "Neptunium", 93, 237 h]
                                > class var Plutonium = new Element["Pu", "Plutonium", 94, 244 h]
                                > class var Americium = new Element["Am", "Americium", 95, 243 h]
                                > class var Curium = new Element["Cm", "Curium", 96, 247 h]
                                > class var Berkelium = new Element["Bk", "Berkelium", 97, 247 h]
                                > class var Californium = new Element["Cf", "Californium", 98, 251 h]
                                > class var Einsteinum = new Element["Es", "Einsteinum", 99, 252 h]
                                > class var Fermium = new Element["Fm", "Fermium", 100, 257 h]
                                > class var Mendelevium = new Element["Md", "Mendelevium", 101, 258 h]
                                > class var Nobelium = new Element["No", "Nobelium", 102, 259 h]
                                > class var Lawrencium = new Element["Lr", "Lawrencium", 103, 262 h]
                                > class var Rutherfordium = new Element["Rf", "Rutherfordium", 104, 261 h]
                                > class var Dubnium = new Element["Db", "Dubnium", 105, 262 h]
                                > class var Seaborgium = new Element["Sg", "Seaborgium", 106, 266 h]
                                > class var Bohrium = new Element["Bh", "Bohrium", 107, 264 h]
                                > class var Hassium = new Element["Hs", "Hassium", 108, 277 h]
                                > class var Meitnerium = new Element["Mt", "Meitnerium", 109, 268 h]
                                > class var Darmstadtium = new Element["Ds", "Darmstadtium", 110, 271 h]
                                > class var Roentgenium = new Element["Rg", "Roentgenium", 111, 272 h]
                                > }
                                >
                                >
                                > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                                >
                                > Regards,
                                >
                                > O.G.
                                >

                                Corrected mistakes with Iridium, Gold and Radon. Damn my eyes!
                              • Alan Eliasen
                                ... Outstanding work! I ll see what I can do to turn the numbers after the u and the half-life values into something that Frink will parse directly. (The u
                                Message 15 of 23 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                  overgauss wrote:
                                  >>Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                  >>any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                  >>uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                                  >>after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                  >>half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                  >>have the u replaced with an h for half life.

                                  Outstanding work! I'll see what I can do to turn the numbers after
                                  the u and the half-life values into something that Frink will parse
                                  directly. (The u represents the standardized atomic mass unit,
                                  1.66053886e-27 kg, and is parsed as such.) For the short term, I may
                                  just comment them out because Frink doesn't have the concept of an
                                  uncertainty represented by a standard deviation. It has the idea of a
                                  hard uncertainty that can be modeled by interval arithmetic, but that
                                  would give illusory results.

                                  Thanks for putting all of this in! I'll also add some methods to
                                  iterate through all the elements and look them up by name or symbol or
                                  atomic number.

                                  --
                                  Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                  eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                  http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                • overgauss
                                  ... Ahh. Understood. Please let me know what else I can do to assist! I was wondering how you d handle half life etc and figured that they d be deleted or
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                    --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > overgauss wrote:
                                    > >>Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                    > >>any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                    > >>uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                                    > >>after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                    > >>half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                    > >>have the u replaced with an h for half life.
                                    >
                                    > Outstanding work! I'll see what I can do to turn the numbers after
                                    > the u and the half-life values into something that Frink will parse
                                    > directly. (The u represents the standardized atomic mass unit,
                                    > 1.66053886e-27 kg, and is parsed as such.) For the short term, I may
                                    > just comment them out because Frink doesn't have the concept of an
                                    > uncertainty represented by a standard deviation. It has the idea of a
                                    > hard uncertainty that can be modeled by interval arithmetic, but that
                                    > would give illusory results.
                                    >
                                    > Thanks for putting all of this in! I'll also add some methods to
                                    > iterate through all the elements and look them up by name or symbol or
                                    > atomic number.
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                    > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                    > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                    >

                                    Ahh. Understood. Please let me know what else I can do to assist! I
                                    was wondering how you'd handle half life etc and figured that they'd
                                    be deleted or somesuch.

                                    Is there a way to use Frink with Spaced Repetition
                                    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graduated_intervals) to learn things
                                    like elements or anything else in its data file? Perhaps once I get
                                    more knowledgeable about programing I can use Frink as a learning tool
                                    as well. My ignorance on the subject has me inclined to believe that
                                    Frink is aptly suited for such things.

                                    In anycase, if anyone has use of my services, data entry or otherwise,
                                    please feel free to call on me. Anything I can do that will help me
                                    get more involved with Frink is fine by me.

                                    Regards,

                                    O.G.
                                  • overgauss
                                    ... Another quick question or muse rather. How useful would things like Mathmetical/Scientific formulas in Frink be? I know I will have to learn alot of
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                      --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > overgauss wrote:
                                      > >>Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                      > >>any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                      > >>uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                                      > >>after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                      > >>half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                      > >>have the u replaced with an h for half life.
                                      >
                                      > Outstanding work! I'll see what I can do to turn the numbers after
                                      > the u and the half-life values into something that Frink will parse
                                      > directly. (The u represents the standardized atomic mass unit,
                                      > 1.66053886e-27 kg, and is parsed as such.) For the short term, I may
                                      > just comment them out because Frink doesn't have the concept of an
                                      > uncertainty represented by a standard deviation. It has the idea of a
                                      > hard uncertainty that can be modeled by interval arithmetic, but that
                                      > would give illusory results.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks for putting all of this in! I'll also add some methods to
                                      > iterate through all the elements and look them up by name or symbol or
                                      > atomic number.
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                      > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                      > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                      >


                                      Another quick question or muse rather.

                                      How useful would things like Mathmetical/Scientific formulas in
                                      Frink be? I know I will have to learn alot of formulas here shortly
                                      and was wondering if it would be possible to integrate them into
                                      Frink. I could then use Frink to learn the formulas and once learned
                                      go the 'cheating route' and just use Frink to cut to the chase to make
                                      my computations easier and faster.

                                      I'm sure I'm getting quite ahead of myself, yet I'm compelled to ask
                                      anyway. I have several more questions, but these seemed the most
                                      pressing (lol) atm.
                                    • Alan Eliasen
                                      ... I ve extended this file a bit to add accessor functions which allow you to look up elements by name, symbol, or atomic number, and the ability to iterate
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                        > overgauss wrote:
                                        >>>Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                        >>>any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                        >>>uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the website
                                        >>>after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                        >>>half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                        >>>have the u replaced with an h for half life.

                                        I've extended this file a bit to add accessor functions which allow
                                        you to look up elements by name, symbol, or atomic number, and the
                                        ability to iterate through all elements in a few different ways. The
                                        file is available here:

                                        http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink

                                        or, more directly, here:

                                        http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink

                                        Let me know what you think.

                                        --
                                        Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                        eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                        http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                      • Alan Eliasen
                                        ... It s been on my wish list to devise a way to have Frink suggest the equations as well as calculate with them. That would greatly improve its power. I
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                          overgauss wrote:
                                          > How useful would things like Mathmetical/Scientific formulas in
                                          > Frink be? I know I will have to learn alot of formulas here shortly
                                          > and was wondering if it would be possible to integrate them into
                                          > Frink. I could then use Frink to learn the formulas and once learned
                                          > go the 'cheating route' and just use Frink to cut to the chase to make
                                          > my computations easier and faster.

                                          It's been on my wish list to devise a way to have Frink suggest the
                                          equations as well as calculate with them. That would greatly improve
                                          its power. I think that this will require some sort of symbolic
                                          algebraic manipulation.

                                          Here's one way of how I've been imagining it. You might define a
                                          system of equations showing how properties of objects interrelate:

                                          system Sphere
                                          {
                                          radius is Length
                                          diameter === 2 radius
                                          circumference === 2 diameter
                                          volume === 4/3 pi radius^3
                                          }

                                          You could then specify one property of the sphere and the rest would
                                          get solved for. To avoid specifying the equations, and all the
                                          directions they could be solved, you'd want Frink to rearrange the
                                          equations as necessary. You don't want to have to write both

                                          diameter === 2 radius
                                          and
                                          radius === diameter/2

                                          Needless to say, writing a symbolic algebra package is not trivial.
                                          Does anyone have any expertise in this area? I've been working on some
                                          tree-rewriting rules, but haven't gotten too far.

                                          --
                                          Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                          eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                          http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                        • overgauss
                                          ... website ... Gosh I didn t mean to generate so much work for you! Thank you nonetheless. I ve tried it out a few times and I can t seem to be able to sort
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Sep 22, 2006
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                                            --- In frink@yahoogroups.com, Alan Eliasen <eliasen@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > > overgauss wrote:
                                            > >>>Here's a preliminary shot at it. Please let me know if anyone finds
                                            > >>>any errors. I used the IUPAC table 03 October version. Also for
                                            > >>>uncertainty levels I just put the number in parenthesis on the
                                            website
                                            > >>>after the u. I.E 207.2(1) for Lead is 207.2 u1. Longest confirmed
                                            > >>>half lifes for elements that have no stable or long lived nuclides
                                            > >>>have the u replaced with an h for half life.
                                            >
                                            > I've extended this file a bit to add accessor functions which allow
                                            > you to look up elements by name, symbol, or atomic number, and the
                                            > ability to iterate through all elements in a few different ways. The
                                            > file is available here:
                                            >
                                            > http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink
                                            >
                                            > or, more directly, here:
                                            >
                                            > http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink
                                            >
                                            > Let me know what you think.
                                            >
                                            > --
                                            > Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                            > eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                            > http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
                                            >

                                            Gosh I didn't mean to generate so much work for you! Thank you
                                            nonetheless. I've tried it out a few times and I can't seem to be
                                            able to sort via the below commands...
                                            // This class also has methods to enumerate through all elements (e.g.
                                            // Element.listByName[], Element.listBySymbol[],
                                            Element.listByNumber[])
                                            //
                                            // The methods Element.getByName[str] and Element.getByNumber[num] allow
                                            // you to look up elements by name, symbol, or atomic number

                                            Each time I try it I get the same list in the same order. What am I
                                            doing wrong?

                                            Thanks,

                                            O.G.

                                            PS. has that instructor gotten back to you in regards to a tutorial or
                                            some set of programmed instructions? I've printed out the text of
                                            Frink.docs but It's quite an unwieldy tome as I didn't have access to
                                            a duplex printer and therefore couldn't print on both sides of the paper.
                                          • Alan Eliasen
                                            ... It was necessary work! It always helps me to improve Frink by using it to tackle real-world problems. And it pointed me to another problem, ... You
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Sep 25, 2006
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                                              overgauss wrote:
                                              > Gosh I didn't mean to generate so much work for you!

                                              It was necessary work! It always helps me to improve Frink by using
                                              it to tackle real-world problems. And it pointed me to another problem,
                                              discussed below:

                                              > I've tried it out a few times and I can't seem to be
                                              > able to sort via the below commands...
                                              > // This class also has methods to enumerate through all elements (e.g.
                                              > // Element.listByName[], Element.listBySymbol[],
                                              > Element.listByNumber[])
                                              >
                                              > Each time I try it I get the same list in the same order. What am I
                                              > doing wrong?

                                              You weren't doing anything wrong. I was being a bit lazy and stupid
                                              about the sorting. The problem was that the sort[] function sorts a
                                              list in-place. The previous code would just sort the elements and
                                              return them. If you, say, assigned the sorted-by-name list to a
                                              variable, and then, say, sorted by atomic number, it would alter the
                                              sorted-by-name list stored in the other variable too!

                                              I've fixed that situation by adding a method .shallowCopy[] to
                                              arrays, allowing you to copy them before you sort them! This was needed
                                              for a long time, so I'm glad that you gave me the incentive to rectify
                                              the situation.

                                              The elements file has been fixed to copy the arrays before sorting,
                                              and sort only once, so it's more efficient and less confusing, but it
                                              requires today's release of Frink or later to work! (2006-09-25). The
                                              altered file is available here:

                                              http://futureboy.us/fsp/colorize.fsp?fileName=elements.frink

                                              or, more directly, here:

                                              http://futureboy.us/frinksamp/elements.frink

                                              > PS. has that instructor gotten back to you in regards to a tutorial or
                                              > some set of programmed instructions? I've printed out the text of
                                              > Frink.docs but It's quite an unwieldy tome as I didn't have access to
                                              > a duplex printer and therefore couldn't print on both sides of the paper.

                                              I haven't been able to find the tutorials that he produced. I might
                                              suggest that when printing that you use a browser like Firefox or
                                              Mozilla. From the menu, choose "View | Use Style | Compact" to select a
                                              compact stylesheet suitable for printing. This will save lots of paper!

                                              I'll see what I can do to develop a shorter tutorial. Thanks again
                                              very much for the testing and the suggestions!

                                              --
                                              Alan Eliasen | "When trouble is solved before it
                                              eliasen@... | forms, who calls that clever?"
                                              http://futureboy.us/ | --Sun Tzu
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