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CognitiveDissonance: NRA targeting women

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  • Imp Ster
    Reuters had this odd fluff piece in the post-Thanskgiving news digest. so many glaring contradictions, so little time to ridicule them all properly. they even
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 24, 2006
      Reuters had this odd fluff piece in the post-Thanskgiving news digest.
      so many glaring contradictions, so little time to ridicule them all
      properly.
      they even managed to find somebody by the name of "Fowler" to get a
      duck-hunting quote from... oh, riiight.

      - anyway, read on and laugh-weep as i did.

      ...

      In U.S., women go wild for hunting

      FREEPORT, Maine (Reuters) - It's deer season in Maine and although
      the hunting department of outdoor retail specialist L.L. Bean is
      packed, this is no old-boy's club.

      Among the aisles of aerosol deer urine and digital duck calls, there
      are racks of women's clothing in mossy-oak camouflage, as well as
      plenty of fluorescent hunter orange.

      Lined up behind the counter are dozens of guns, many available with
      a "short-stock" designed to fit more comfortably into women's shorter
      arms.

      That's because an increasing number of women are heading into the
      woods, becoming one of the most enthusiastic segments of the hunting
      world.

      Take Laura Beth Fowler, an 18-year-old from McKenzie, Tennessee, who
      took up shooting three years ago and is now a member of one of the
      few all-girl trap-shooting teams in the country.

      With her coach and girls from the team, Fowler loves heading into the
      wild to shoot birds -- right down to getting out of bed at 4 a.m. and
      huddling in chilly duck-blinds.

      "It's a bunch of fun. And it's just so beautiful, being in the
      woods," she said.

      Fowler is not alone. The number of women hunters in the United States
      is on the rise.

      "During the 1980s, we saw a pretty good increase in women hunting,
      which flattened out in the 1990s," said Mark Damian Duda, executive
      director of Responsive Management, a research firm specializing in
      outdoor recreation trends. "And now there seems to be an increase in
      the past three or four years."

      One recent study by the National Sporting Goods Association estimates
      more than 3 million women now hunt, accounting for about 16 percent
      of the nearly 21 million active hunters in the United States.

      That translates into big money. The National Shooting Sports
      Foundation estimates that Americans spend $2.1 billion on firearms
      and ammunition each year.

      The study, which covered 2001 to 2005, found that 2.4 million women
      hunted with firearms in 2005, up 72 percent from 2001. Fifty percent
      more are target shooting, while the number of women bow-hunters has
      grown 176 percent to 786,000.

      The fastest-growing age groups are women aged 18 to 24, followed by
      those aged 35 to 44.

      HUNTING TO RELAX

      For some, the appeal is strictly social since hunting offers a woman
      a way to spend time with a husband, boyfriend or brother who already
      hunts.

      For others, including Fowler, who doesn't come from a family of
      hunters and doesn't particularly like hunting with her boyfriend,
      it's a way to relax with friends, get closer to nature and develop a
      new skill.

      Driving the trend, Duda said, are programs like those organized by
      the National Rifle Association that make it easier for women to get
      involved. The NRA's Women on Target division offers such events as a
      $500 two-day deer hunt in Texas.

      The National Wild Turkey Federation, through its Women in the
      Outdoors group, organizes local one- and two-day hunting expeditions,
      and skeet shooting events geared just for women.

      Freeport, Maine-based L.L. Bean and Manchester, Vermont-based
      retailer Orvis also put on women-only introductory shooting programs,
      and both report fast-growing demand.

      Another factor is a rise in the number of women involved in all-
      outdoor recreation -- from camping to kayaking.

      But the trend surprises many, since women are more likely than men to
      find sport hunting cruel.

      "Women have long formed the backbone of the humane movement," said
      Wayne Pacelle, head of the Humane Society of the United States,
      adding that women account for 70 percent of his group's 10 million
      members.

      While the Humane Society does not campaign against all forms of
      hunting, it does focus on practices it considers particularly
      unethical, such as "canned hunting," where hunters pay to shoot
      animals that have been confined, bear-baiting or use of steel-jawed
      traps.

      Many women hunters seem as enamored with the scenery as they are with
      the hunt.

      "I just love anything that gives me the chance to be outdoors," said
      Stephanie Mallory, who works in marketing and public relations for
      several hunting manufacturers, and lives in Birmingham, Alabama.

      "This weekend, I was up in a deer stand and I got to watch three
      otter playing in a pond right next to me. I feel very lucky. Not many
      people get to experience wildlife so close."

      Helga Cotta, 57, from South China, Maine, said: "Hunting season is
      like my vacation. It's so solitary, you can leave all your problems
      at home and just go out and watch the woods come alive around you in
      the morning."

      While Cotta has been hunting for decades, she said it's a sport that
      guarantees constant new challenges.

      And of course, unlike other outdoor sports, hunting can resolve the
      occasional "what's-for-supper" dilemma.

      Said Peggy Long, a die-hard hunter and general manager of Orvis'
      Sandanona, New York, Wingshooting School: "It's just so rewarding to
      be able to go to your freezer and have stuff you shot on hand for
      dinner."

      http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061125/us_nm/life_usa_hunting_dc_2

      ...

      "bunch 'o fun... so beeyootiful!"

      curious, that Mallory construct can see "otters playing" and enjoy
      that, even as she lurks like a killer vulture hoping for deer.
      so much mental illness, so little Valium.

      ...
    • Pat Scala
      Up in these parts it is the boys that do the hunting. The local Wal-Mart and K-Mart stores do cater to the local goon hunters and are not featuring girl
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 25, 2006
        Up in these parts it is the "boys" that do the hunting. The local Wal-Mart
        and K-Mart stores do cater to the local goon hunters and are not featuring
        girl hunting things. It should be noted that Vice President Cheney enjoys
        killing things in the name of sport as does his tom-boy daughter, Mary.
        Mary Cheney who supports the killing in Iraq should join the army and go
        there. The army does have girl size killing uniforms.





        -----Original Message-----
        From: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com [mailto:friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Imp Ster
        Sent: Saturday, November 25, 2006 12:06 AM
        To: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Friends of Deer] CognitiveDissonance: NRA targeting women



        Reuters had this odd fluff piece in the post-Thanskgiving news digest.
        so many glaring contradictions, so little time to ridicule them all
        properly.
        they even managed to find somebody by the name of "Fowler" to get a
        duck-hunting quote from... oh, riiight.

        - anyway, read on and laugh-weep as i did.

        ...

        In U.S., women go wild for hunting

        FREEPORT, Maine (Reuters) - It's deer season in Maine and although
        the hunting department of outdoor retail specialist L.L. Bean is
        packed, this is no old-boy's club.

        Among the aisles of aerosol deer urine and digital duck calls, there
        are racks of women's clothing in mossy-oak camouflage, as well as
        plenty of fluorescent hunter orange.

        Lined up behind the counter are dozens of guns, many available with
        a "short-stock" designed to fit more comfortably into women's shorter
        arms.

        That's because an increasing number of women are heading into the
        woods, becoming one of the most enthusiastic segments of the hunting
        world.

        Take Laura Beth Fowler, an 18-year-old from McKenzie, Tennessee, who
        took up shooting three years ago and is now a member of one of the
        few all-girl trap-shooting teams in the country.

        With her coach and girls from the team, Fowler loves heading into the
        wild to shoot birds -- right down to getting out of bed at 4 a.m. and
        huddling in chilly duck-blinds.

        "It's a bunch of fun. And it's just so beautiful, being in the
        woods," she said.

        Fowler is not alone. The number of women hunters in the United States
        is on the rise.

        "During the 1980s, we saw a pretty good increase in women hunting,
        which flattened out in the 1990s," said Mark Damian Duda, executive
        director of Responsive Management, a research firm specializing in
        outdoor recreation trends. "And now there seems to be an increase in
        the past three or four years."

        One recent study by the National Sporting Goods Association estimates
        more than 3 million women now hunt, accounting for about 16 percent
        of the nearly 21 million active hunters in the United States.

        That translates into big money. The National Shooting Sports
        Foundation estimates that Americans spend $2.1 billion on firearms
        and ammunition each year.

        The study, which covered 2001 to 2005, found that 2.4 million women
        hunted with firearms in 2005, up 72 percent from 2001. Fifty percent
        more are target shooting, while the number of women bow-hunters has
        grown 176 percent to 786,000.

        The fastest-growing age groups are women aged 18 to 24, followed by
        those aged 35 to 44.

        HUNTING TO RELAX

        For some, the appeal is strictly social since hunting offers a woman
        a way to spend time with a husband, boyfriend or brother who already
        hunts.

        For others, including Fowler, who doesn't come from a family of
        hunters and doesn't particularly like hunting with her boyfriend,
        it's a way to relax with friends, get closer to nature and develop a
        new skill.

        Driving the trend, Duda said, are programs like those organized by
        the National Rifle Association that make it easier for women to get
        involved. The NRA's Women on Target division offers such events as a
        $500 two-day deer hunt in Texas.

        The National Wild Turkey Federation, through its Women in the
        Outdoors group, organizes local one- and two-day hunting expeditions,
        and skeet shooting events geared just for women.

        Freeport, Maine-based L.L. Bean and Manchester, Vermont-based
        retailer Orvis also put on women-only introductory shooting programs,
        and both report fast-growing demand.

        Another factor is a rise in the number of women involved in all-
        outdoor recreation -- from camping to kayaking.

        But the trend surprises many, since women are more likely than men to
        find sport hunting cruel.

        "Women have long formed the backbone of the humane movement," said
        Wayne Pacelle, head of the Humane Society of the United States,
        adding that women account for 70 percent of his group's 10 million
        members.

        While the Humane Society does not campaign against all forms of
        hunting, it does focus on practices it considers particularly
        unethical, such as "canned hunting," where hunters pay to shoot
        animals that have been confined, bear-baiting or use of steel-jawed
        traps.

        Many women hunters seem as enamored with the scenery as they are with
        the hunt.

        "I just love anything that gives me the chance to be outdoors," said
        Stephanie Mallory, who works in marketing and public relations for
        several hunting manufacturers, and lives in Birmingham, Alabama.

        "This weekend, I was up in a deer stand and I got to watch three
        otter playing in a pond right next to me. I feel very lucky. Not many
        people get to experience wildlife so close."

        Helga Cotta, 57, from South China, Maine, said: "Hunting season is
        like my vacation. It's so solitary, you can leave all your problems
        at home and just go out and watch the woods come alive around you in
        the morning."

        While Cotta has been hunting for decades, she said it's a sport that
        guarantees constant new challenges.

        And of course, unlike other outdoor sports, hunting can resolve the
        occasional "what's-for-supper" dilemma.

        Said Peggy Long, a die-hard hunter and general manager of Orvis'
        Sandanona, New York, Wingshooting School: "It's just so rewarding to
        be able to go to your freezer and have stuff you shot on hand for
        dinner."

        http://news.
        <http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061125/us_nm/life_usa_hunting_dc_2>
        yahoo.com/s/nm/20061125/us_nm/life_usa_hunting_dc_2

        ...

        "bunch 'o fun... so beeyootiful!"

        curious, that Mallory construct can see "otters playing" and enjoy
        that, even as she lurks like a killer vulture hoping for deer.
        so much mental illness, so little Valium.

        ...





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