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The Last Doe -

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  • Pat Scala
    While living in New Jersey, my yard became a stage for the trials and tribulations of the deer that found sanctuary and food. Anyone who becomes friendly with
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 4 6:16 PM
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      While living in New Jersey, my yard became a stage for the trials and
      tribulations of the deer that found sanctuary and food. Anyone who
      becomes friendly with deer knows that each animal has a distinctive look
      and personality. For purposes of identity, I used to give each
      distinctive animal a name.

      Sugar was born in the spring of 1992, a fawn of an old doe that I called
      Mad Cow. Sugar grew into a beautiful doe, tall and well proportioned.
      Sugar had a white patch above each hoof and was easy to identify among
      the deer that visited my feeder.

      Sugar seemed to lack the fear instinct that the rest of her herd
      exhibited. For the most part, other does were friendly but would bolt
      at a sudden movement or an expression on my face that made them uneasy.
      Sugar, on the other hand was never fearful, but she wasn't friendly
      either. Although larger than the other does, Sugar left doing battle
      for another day. She allowed smaller and younger deer to dominate the
      food area.

      We placed on our feeders high from the ground to discourage deer
      emptying them. But, Sugar would stand upright on her long back legs and
      make a pest out of herself in the bird feeders. At times such as this I
      would bolt from the house waiving a broom and sugar would move away
      keeping just enough distance between her and the broom.

      Even though corn for the deer was placed underneath the crab apple tree
      in the back, I would find Sugar standing outside the back door looking
      for her goodies - bananas and any sweet fruit. Sugar enjoyed stale
      cake, cookies and was crazy for peanuts.

      I classified Sugar among the major does - those deer that lived to
      maturity, gave birth to fawns and returned for corn year after year.
      Through the years the major doe population diminished; the friendly
      Bobber Girl; the timid White Ear-the sister and polar opposite of Sugar.
      There was the Snorter, Thumper, Boo-Boo, Ginger, Gimpy Girl and the
      BaBoo Cow all of whom would eventually fall victim to growing traffic,
      disease and the hunter's arrow.

      Before I left New Jersey the corn pile was now populated by young does
      without names and young bucks that would not live beyond next year's
      hunting season. But, at the back door stood Sugar waiting for her
      sweets-the last of the major does.

      The best of luck to you Sugar, and I hope the folks that now occupy the
      house of the door where you stand waiting for your goodies will not be
      unkind.





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