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Deer feeders are growing in popularity among area officials

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  • Pat Scala
    Deer feeders are growing in popularity among area officials As the number of new homes in this area continue to rise, the clashes between where Chester County
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 22, 2004
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      Deer feeders are growing in popularity among area officials







      As the number of new homes in this area continue to rise, the clashes
      between where Chester County has been (lush woods and interesting
      wildlife) and where it is headed (a region of medium to high-end
      residential communities surrounded by light retail and well-manicured
      open space).



      A continuing issue for those who inhabit and build living communities
      within the open areas has been how to handle the deer population which
      can be at the same time the most harmless and potentially harmful
      species facing families.
      The deer has unfortunately found itself to be the victim of progress as
      its habitat has been radically altered to accommodate endless intrusions
      from road construction and residential sprawl.
      Many homeowners have ventured into their backyards to find the furry
      visitors snacking on shrubbery or finding goodies in the garden. Many
      have adjusted to meet the deer by either laying out food for it or by
      building fences to keep it out.
      The changing of the habitat has also brought new hazards to the human
      population as we now know that the deer is one of the biggest carriers
      of a particularly harmful parasite, the deer tick.
      We know that ticks can carry a host of severe illnesses including Lyme
      disease and Rocky Mountain Yellow Spotted Fever.
      Fear of such tick-borne illnesses has led public and private interests
      to put more emphasis on deer hunting season and some to go as far as
      hiring sportsmen groups to target venison in local residential
      communities.
      The Brandywine Conservancy has wisely latched on to the deerfeeder
      program and hopefully it will wisely govern the expansion of the
      initiative within the southern Chester County region.
      Right now, deer feeders look like the best option for controlling the
      tick population in the area while posting the least amount of potential
      damage to the deer.
      The pesticide that is rolled on the fur of the animal through the
      corn-feeding mechanism has been shown to be relatively harmless to deer
      at this point and the potential impact to other wildlife is also worthy
      of research.
      Townships looking to invest in deerfeeders should be commended and
      should hold workshops and question and answer sessions conducted between
      wildlife experts, governing officials and residents to see if the device
      is proper for their ecosystem.





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