Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

CORRECTION/LETTER: Support Anti-Bowhunting Ordinance in Cromwell, CT

Expand Messages
  • Colleen Klaum
    I accidentally omitted a number in the zip code in the original message.-Bonnie LETTER: Support Anti-Bowhunting Ordinance in Cromwell, CT Alert by Bonnie West
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 26, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      I accidentally omitted a number in the zip code in the original message.-Bonnie LETTER: Support Anti-Bowhunting Ordinance in Cromwell, CT

      Alert by Bonnie West bbwest@... (snet.net)
      & Barbara Biel bibiel@... (yahoo.com)

      *** Please write even if you don't live in CT ***
      We need to generate as many letters as possible!

      LETTERS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JAN 8, 2003 PUBLIC HEARING

      ----------------------------------

      BACKGROUND:

      Source: US Sportsmen's Alliance
      Dec 12, 2002

      Connecticut Sportsmen: Beware of Anti-Bowhunting Local Ordinance

      An ordinance being considered by the Cromwell Board of Selectmen would ban the discharge of a bow within city limits without a permit. The ordinance places the control of discharging a bow and, potentially, all bowhunting, solely in the hands of the police chief.

      The Cromwell Board of Selectmen will meet to discuss the ordinance. It is vague and shortsighted. Perhaps the current chief of police supports hunting and archery and is willing to issue permits, but what happens if his replacement does not? The ordinance does not require the chief to issue a permit in a timely fashion, nor does it set parameters under which he must approve or reject a permit request.

      Such ordinances have been introduced in other states. They stem from unfounded safety fears and anti-hunting sentiment.

      A National Safety Council report says hunting is safer than swimming, bicycling, and playing baseball, golf, tennis and basketball. The International Hunter Education Association reports only four injuries and one fatality out of six million bowhunters in 1999.

      Information on this website can be reprinted with a citation to the US Sportsmen's Alliance and www.ussportsmen.org

      More info: http://www.ctsportsmen.com/issues/cromwell.htm

      ----------------------------------------------

      Model ordinance:
      http://www.ctsportsmen.com/issues/woodbridge_ordinance.htm



      CONTACT:

      Cromwell Township
      41 West Street
      Cromwell, CT 06416
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048
      Web: www.cromwellct.com
      Email form: http://www.cromwellct.com/contact.htm

      Office & Contact Information

      Selectman

      Stanley A. Terry
      First Selectman
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048


      Governing Body

      David R. Beauchemin
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048

      Ronald L. Eddy
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048

      Mary F. Konopka
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048

      Raymond E. Mildren
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048

      Richard R. Newton
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048

      Al Waters
      Deputy First Selectman
      Phone: (860) 632-3410
      Fax: (860) 632-7048


      SAMPLE LETTER
      Written by Barbara Biel bibiel@... (yahoo.com)
      & Bonnie West bbwest@... (snet.net)

      Email form: http://www.cromwellct.com/contact.htm

      *Mailed letters preferred
      --------------------------------------------------------------


      Please enact complete ban on the discharge of a bow within Cromwell city limits

      Ladies and Gentlemen:

      The following letter accurately expresses my opinion regarding this issue.

      I am writing regarding the ordinance being considered by the Cromwell Board of Selectmen that would ban the discharge of a bow within city limits without a permit. The ordinance would place the control of discharging a bow in the hands of the police chief. I urge you to instead impose a complete ban on the discharge of a bow in Cromwell, as the presence of shooters within city limits poses a significant safety threat to residents. I will site just a few recent accidents, and enclose copies of the full news articles for your review.

      According to news reports, on October 5, 2002, a 14-year-old boy from Lebanon, Ohio was killed when his father accidentally shot him in the chest with a crossbow while the two were deer hunting. Deputies said that the father mistook his son for a deer and fired his crossbow, striking his son. The boy was airlifted to a nearby hospital but later died from the
      injury.

      On September 25, an 11-month-old Indiana girl was hospitalized after she was struck in the head by an arrow from a hunting bow. The girl's father told police that the arrow accidentally discharged from a bow he was using. A police spokesman said that the baby was alert and screaming when paramedics arrived.

      And on August 14, 2001, a veteran Big Island (Hawaii) bowman was killed by his son's arrow in a hunting accident. Thomas Depontes, 44, of Kailua-Kona, died after an arrow fired at a sheep by his eldest son apparently ricocheted off a rock and hit Depontes in the heart. Archers across the state were puzzled over how Depontes, a longtime hunter, could
      have been in a position to be hit by the arrow, and how a son he trained could have released it. The family reported that the arrow-head remained lodged in Depontes' heart even after he wrenched the shaft free, and that he died from loss of blood. Depontes was pronounced dead after arriving at North Hawai'i Community Hospital in Waimea.

      In addition, bowhunting is one of the cruelest forms of hunting because primitive archery equipment wounds more animals than it kills. Dozens of scientific studies indicate that bowhunting yields more than a 50 percent crippling rate. (Benke, Adrian. The Bowhunting Alternative. San Antonio: B. Todd Press, 1989.) For every animal dragged from the woods, at least one animal is left wounded to suffer -- either to bleed to death or to become infested with parasites and diseases. To bring home this point, on November 13, 2002, The Hartford Courant (CT), in an Associated Press article, reported that Lt. Richard Cochran of Greenwich was arrested the previous Sunday, a day on which Connecticut state law prohibits hunting. Cochran told the Greenwich Times that he was in the woods Sunday searching for a deer that he had wounded with an arrow on Saturday. He said the deer ran away after he wounded it, and he returned Sunday to try to find and kill the animal.

      As a member of the non-hunting majority, I urge the Cromwell town government to completely ban the discharge of a bow within city limits, and keep our towns and woodlands safe for us and the creatures who live there. There is absolutely no justification for exposing residents, their children, and pets, to the serious risks involved in using bows and arrows near private homes. Even one accident is one too many.

      Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to your decision.

      Sincerely,




      -----------------------

      ATTACHMENT:

      http://www.newsnet5.com/news/1705891/detail.html

      Boy Killed By Crossbow: Names Released
      14-Year-Old Boy Dies In Hunting Accident

      UPDATED: October 8, 2002

      ADAMSVILLE, Ohio -- Authorities on Monday identified a 14-year-old boy who was killed when his father accidentally shot him in the chest with a crossbow while the two were deer hunting.

      The Muskingum County sheriff's office said that Jason Foster of Lebanon, Ohio, and his father, Alan Foster, 39, of Middletown, Ohio, were hunting deer near Adamsville on Saturday.

      Authorities said that Alan Foster was in an open hay field when he apparently spotted movement in an adjacent corn field.

      Deputies said that Foster mistook his son for a deer and fired his crossbow, striking his son.

      Jason Foster was airlifted to a nearby hospital but later died from the injury.

      The pair came to Muskingum County for a father-son hunting trip, a Columbus television station reported.

      The accident was the first fatal bow-hunting accident in Muskingum County in nearly ten years.

      "Every hunter in Ohio is required to have a hunter's safety course that's offered locally in every city," Jim Marshall from the Ohio Division of Wildlife said. "The very first thing that is stressed throughout the course is identifying the target."

      Unlike gun-hunting season, bow-hunting season does not require hunters to wear bright orange clothing, Marshall said.

      --------------------------------------

      http://www.missouribowhunters.com/missouribowhunters/news/001.html

      Thursday, December 19, 2002

      Hunting Bow Accident Injures Indiana Infant
      Wed Sep 25, 4:55 PM ET

      An 11-month-old Indiana girl is in the hospital after she was struck in the head by an arrow from a hunting bow. Haley Johnson, of Muncie, is in serious, but stable, condition.

      The girl's father, 21-year-old Troy Johnson, told police that the arrow accidentally discharged from a bow he was using.

      A police spokesman said that the baby was alert and screaming when paramedics arrived.

      He added that police are investigating, but doesn't know if charges will be filed.

      -----------------------

      http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2001/Aug/14/ln/ln05a.html
      Posted on: Tuesday, August 14, 2001

      Family's tragedy stuns hunting community

      By Walter Wright
      Advertiser Staff Writer

      A bizarre hunting accident in which a veteran Big Island bowman was killed by his son's arrow Sunday has devastated that family and stunned Hawai'i's archery community.

      Thomas Depontes, 44, of Kailua-Kona, died after an arrow fired at a sheep by his eldest son apparently ricocheted off a rock and hit Depontes in the heart.

      The son, Thomas, 18, was "not doing too well," Jamie Depontes, a relative, said yesterday.

      Archers across the state were puzzled over how Depontes, a longtime hunter, could have been in a position to be hit by the arrow, and how a son he trained could have released it.

      The tragic news cast a pall over Depontes' 110 state co-workers at the Keahole Airport, where he was a laborer in the maintenance department.

      Co-workers have gathered around the Depontes family before, raising thousands of dollars when their daughter was stricken with leukemia, which is in remission.

      They undoubtedly will rally again; officials learned yesterday that Depontes' wife, Gina Marie, was recently laid off. But friends said their sadness could not compare with the agony of Depontes' son.

      "That has got to be devastating," airport operations manager George Ackerman said.

      Joe Maria, Depontes' supervisor at the airport, visited the family yesterday and said the son is racked with feelings of guilt even though, as Maria put it, "God only knows" why the arrow glanced off a rock on a deadly path.

      Police gave no details on the relative location of the two men when the injury occurred Sunday on Pu'uwa'awa'a Ranch, but said they have tentatively classified the death as an accident.

      His two sons, who had dragged their father to his truck after the accident, returned to the scene yesterday with police to reconstruct the events.

      Funeral arrangements have been delayed while police await the arrival of a pathologist from Maui tomorrow to conduct an autopsy.

      But Maria said family reported that the arrow-head remained lodged in Depontes' heart even after he wrenched the shaft free, and that he died from loss of blood. Depontes was pronounced dead after arriving at North Hawai'i Community Hospital in Waimea.

      Hawai'i's hunting community was waiting for details of the strange accident in hopes of preventing a recurrence.

      "My phone has been ringing off the hook with calls from my hunting safety instructors asking what happened and what we can do to avoid this in the future," said Wendell Kam of the Department of Land and Natural Resources.

      Kam, specialist in charge of conservation education, organizes the hunter-education courses required of the10,000 to 11,000 people who buy the state's all-purpose hunting license for firearms and bow and arrow. He was hunting in another part of the same ranch Sunday, and heard the news as he was returning to Honolulu.

      Kam said the only other archery fatality he knew of occurred when a Mainland hunter accidentally shot an arrow directly at another hunter he didn't see because he was camouflaged and in cover.

      The state's class tells hunters to know their "zones of fire" and to not shoot if anyone is near that zone, Kam said. "And we do impress on them the potential for ricochets," he said. "The basic rule is if something can happen, it will happen."

      "And if it cannot happen, it will happen anyway," added Al Marciel, proprietor of Jimmy's Archery in Hilo. Marciel knew Depontes as an "old-timer" in the hunting fraternity.

      "And we cannot imagine an old-time hunter being in a position where that might occur," Marciel said.

      Arrows can ricochet off something as flimsy as a twig, said Jay Chrisman of Honolulu, past president of the Aloha Archery Association.

      Chrisman, who has hunted with bow and arrow locally and around the world for 35 years, said "this is just one of those things that is a freak accident, and it will probably go another 30, 40 or 50 years before you hear of one like it again."

      He described hunting with bow and arrow as a connection with nature that people in Hawai'i have known for a long time.

      Depontes and his sons "were doing what they love. He was probably a very, very good father, who liked to be with his kids, doing something healthy and beautiful," Chrisman said.


      "Live in peace with the animals. Animals bring love to our hearts, and warmth to our souls."

      Colleen Klaum

      "He who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." Immanuel Kant

      Be the voice for the voiceless, join our group today:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CorrectTreatment/










      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.