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Re: [Friends of Deer] Outdoors: Some strange and wacky whitetail deer behavior

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  • Anna CARNER
    Pat, As you know, I ve raised and interacted with Blossom and Baby Boomer for 10 years. In all of that time -- with daily observation and hands-on
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 26, 2010
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      Pat,

      As you know, I've raised and interacted with Blossom and Baby Boomer for 10
      years. In all of that time -- with daily observation and hands-on
      interaction, I never, ever saw any of the aggressive bird or fish eating
      characteristics that this columnist writes about. He is simply not correct.

      We also had a parrot, cat, dog and several horses on the property -- and
      plenty of bird feeders for the wild birds. The deer observed them with
      interest -- but never bit, snapped or wanted to eat flesh of any sort.

      I have never witnessed (nor has our wildlife biologist friend) a male deer
      urinating in anything other than the squat position.

      What strange forest do you imagine this reporter visits?

      Anna
      YouTube: Pet Deer Blossom

      On Fri, Oct 22, 2010 at 2:18 PM, pat scala <patscala@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > I don't usually copy columns from the outdoor reporters that cater to the
      > hunters but this particular column has some interesting observations about
      > deer.
      >
      > By Len Lisenbee, outdoors columnist
      > Messenger Post
      > Posted Oct 21, 2010 @ 02:11 PM
      >
      > MPNnow.com �
      > Whitetail deer are one of the most widespread critters in North America.
      > According to once-reliable sources, they are surpassed only by the black
      > bear. I
      > say once reliable because, during the past week, I have learned a bunch of
      > new
      > and incredible information about this species.
      >
      > For instance, did you know that whitetails will eat birds? I didn't either
      > until
      > I received a video showing a doe chasing an injured songbird. I believe it
      > was
      > an eastern phoebe, but don't quote me on that one. Regardless, the deer
      > managed
      > to corner it, then grabbed it with its mouth, and proceeded to eat it, on
      > the
      > spot, feathers and all. Yuck!
      >
      > Of course I immediately suspected someone with too much time on their hands
      >
      > doing a little creative photo-shopping with that video. But no, it was a
      > real
      > incident, witnessed by at least three people.
      >
      > I have witnessed a lot of strange deer activity throughout my career. When
      > a
      > person is tucked into a nice ground-blind or handy tree in the pre-dawn or
      > dusk
      > hours waiting on scoundrels to show up and do their deeds, you get to
      > witness a
      > lot of wildlife activity, and some of it can only be described as strange.
      >
      > For example, did you know that whitetail bucks urinate two different ways?
      > Most
      > of the time they assume a "four-feet on the ground" position, not unlike a
      > male
      > horse, and just let it go. But I have also observed them lifting their hind
      > leg
      > and peeing like a dog. Since just about all of my deer urination
      > observations
      > took place in the fall months, I have to assume that the rut may have
      > influenced
      > the leg-lifting activity. But at the same time, I have to chalk it up to
      > strange
      > behavior.
      >
      > A lot of hunters have wondered how, when a deer has its head down and is
      > actually feeding, it can also spot the slightest movement of a person
      > trying to
      > get closer before taking a shot? The answer is that they have the ability
      > to
      > focus on both close-in and distant objects at the same time, including
      > everything in-between.
      >
      > This trait is possible because the deer's eyes are set high and wide on its
      >
      > head, giving it better than 300 degrees of vision. It comes in handy by
      > permitting the deer to graze while watching for the approach of any
      > predators,
      > including hunters, doing both at the same time.
      >
      > There is one more fact about deer, and this one will probably blow your
      > mind.
      > Deer will actually go fishing! They use their hooves to disable fish such
      > as
      > trout. Then they will grab the fish with their mouths, chew it up, and
      > swallow
      > it. And believe it or not, the researchers who observed this activity noted
      > that
      > whitetail deer commonly eat fish up to 14 inches long! Do those guys have
      > too
      > much free time on their hands, or what?
      >
      > Oh, and a few more tidbit about deer. They are ruminants with a
      > four-chamber
      > stomach, much like cattle. And their digestive tract is around 65 feet
      > long. It
      > normally takes around 36 hours for the grass, twigs, birds or fish they ate
      > to
      > once again appear, this time as those shiny black pellets that hunters are
      > so
      > familiar with.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pat scala
      Maybe we should ask what kind of cigarettes he smokes.  I agree with you Anna.  We used to feed the deer under the same tree that held a bird feeder or
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 27, 2010
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        Maybe we should ask what kind of cigarettes he smokes.  I agree with you Anna. 
        We used to feed the deer under the same tree that held a bird feeder or two. 
        I've observed very young deer follow birds on the ground out of curiosity but
        I've never seen them harm them.  We had a stream out back and I never observed
        the deer trying to catch fish.

        I did, however, observe the deer bullying my cat.

        It is that time of the year when the media will be complaining about deer-car
        collisions, deer ticks and general deer over population -- it is the start of
        the hunting season and the National Rifle Association has their anti-deer
        publicists hard at work.




        ________________________________
        From: Anna CARNER <anna@...>
        To: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, October 26, 2010 6:53:51 PM
        Subject: Re: [Friends of Deer] Outdoors: Some strange and wacky whitetail deer
        behavior

        Pat,

        As you know, I've raised and interacted with Blossom and Baby Boomer for 10
        years.  In all of that time -- with daily observation and hands-on
        interaction, I never, ever saw any of the aggressive bird or fish eating
        characteristics that this columnist writes about.  He is simply not correct.

        We also had a parrot, cat, dog and several horses on the property -- and
        plenty of bird feeders for the wild birds. The deer observed them with
        interest -- but never bit, snapped or wanted to eat flesh of any sort.

        I have never witnessed (nor has our wildlife biologist friend) a male deer
        urinating in anything other than the squat position.

        What strange forest do you imagine this reporter visits?

        Anna
        YouTube:  Pet Deer Blossom

        On Fri, Oct 22, 2010 at 2:18 PM, pat scala <patscala@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > I don't usually copy columns from the outdoor reporters that cater to the
        > hunters but this particular column has some interesting observations about
        > deer.
        >
        > By Len Lisenbee, outdoors columnist
        > Messenger Post
        > Posted Oct 21, 2010 @ 02:11 PM
        >
        > MPNnow.com —
        > Whitetail deer are one of the most widespread critters in North America.
        > According to once-reliable sources, they are surpassed only by the black
        > bear. I
        > say once reliable because, during the past week, I have learned a bunch of
        > new
        > and incredible information about this species.
        >
        > For instance, did you know that whitetails will eat birds? I didn't either
        > until
        > I received a video showing a doe chasing an injured songbird. I believe it
        > was
        > an eastern phoebe, but don't quote me on that one. Regardless, the deer
        > managed
        > to corner it, then grabbed it with its mouth, and proceeded to eat it, on
        > the
        > spot, feathers and all. Yuck!
        >
        > Of course I immediately suspected someone with too much time on their hands
        >
        > doing a little creative photo-shopping with that video. But no, it was a
        > real
        > incident, witnessed by at least three people.
        >
        > I have witnessed a lot of strange deer activity throughout my career. When
        > a
        > person is tucked into a nice ground-blind or handy tree in the pre-dawn or
        > dusk
        > hours waiting on scoundrels to show up and do their deeds, you get to
        > witness a
        > lot of wildlife activity, and some of it can only be described as strange.
        >
        > For example, did you know that whitetail bucks urinate two different ways?
        > Most
        > of the time they assume a "four-feet on the ground" position, not unlike a
        > male
        > horse, and just let it go. But I have also observed them lifting their hind
        > leg
        > and peeing like a dog. Since just about all of my deer urination
        > observations
        > took place in the fall months, I have to assume that the rut may have
        > influenced
        > the leg-lifting activity. But at the same time, I have to chalk it up to
        > strange
        > behavior.
        >
        > A lot of hunters have wondered how, when a deer has its head down and is
        > actually feeding, it can also spot the slightest movement of a person
        > trying to
        > get closer before taking a shot? The answer is that they have the ability
        > to
        > focus on both close-in and distant objects at the same time, including
        > everything in-between.
        >
        > This trait is possible because the deer's eyes are set high and wide on its
        >
        > head, giving it better than 300 degrees of vision. It comes in handy by
        > permitting the deer to graze while watching for the approach of any
        > predators,
        > including hunters, doing both at the same time.
        >
        > There is one more fact about deer, and this one will probably blow your
        > mind.
        > Deer will actually go fishing! They use their hooves to disable fish such
        > as
        > trout. Then they will grab the fish with their mouths, chew it up, and
        > swallow
        > it. And believe it or not, the researchers who observed this activity noted
        > that
        > whitetail deer commonly eat fish up to 14 inches long! Do those guys have
        > too
        > much free time on their hands, or what?
        >
        > Oh, and a few more tidbit about deer. They are ruminants with a
        > four-chamber
        > stomach, much like cattle. And their digestive tract is around 65 feet
        > long. It
        > normally takes around 36 hours for the grass, twigs, birds or fish they ate
        > to
        > once again appear, this time as those shiny black pellets that hunters are
        > so
        > familiar with.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >

        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anna CARNER
        Me too, about the cat. Only when the cat wouldn t stay still for her daily grooming routine (where Blossom would clean her face, tail and body parts.:) Miss
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 27, 2010
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          Me too, about the cat. Only when the cat wouldn't stay still for her daily
          grooming routine (where Blossom would clean her face, tail and body parts.:)
          Miss her so much.

          Anna

          On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 9:12 AM, pat scala <patscala@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > Maybe we should ask what kind of cigarettes he smokes. I agree with you
          > Anna.
          > We used to feed the deer under the same tree that held a bird feeder or
          > two.
          > I've observed very young deer follow birds on the ground out of curiosity
          > but
          > I've never seen them harm them. We had a stream out back and I never
          > observed
          > the deer trying to catch fish.
          >
          > I did, however, observe the deer bullying my cat.
          >
          > It is that time of the year when the media will be complaining about
          > deer-car
          > collisions, deer ticks and general deer over population -- it is the start
          > of
          > the hunting season and the National Rifle Association has their anti-deer
          > publicists hard at work.
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Anna CARNER <anna@... <anna%40unicornfibre.com>>
          > To: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com <friendsofdeer%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Tue, October 26, 2010 6:53:51 PM
          > Subject: Re: [Friends of Deer] Outdoors: Some strange and wacky whitetail
          > deer
          > behavior
          >
          >
          > Pat,
          >
          > As you know, I've raised and interacted with Blossom and Baby Boomer for 10
          > years. In all of that time -- with daily observation and hands-on
          > interaction, I never, ever saw any of the aggressive bird or fish eating
          > characteristics that this columnist writes about. He is simply not
          > correct.
          >
          > We also had a parrot, cat, dog and several horses on the property -- and
          > plenty of bird feeders for the wild birds. The deer observed them with
          > interest -- but never bit, snapped or wanted to eat flesh of any sort.
          >
          > I have never witnessed (nor has our wildlife biologist friend) a male deer
          > urinating in anything other than the squat position.
          >
          > What strange forest do you imagine this reporter visits?
          >
          > Anna
          > YouTube: Pet Deer Blossom
          >
          > On Fri, Oct 22, 2010 at 2:18 PM, pat scala <patscala@...<patscala%40yahoo.com>>
          > wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > I don't usually copy columns from the outdoor reporters that cater to the
          > > hunters but this particular column has some interesting observations
          > about
          > > deer.
          > >
          > > By Len Lisenbee, outdoors columnist
          > > Messenger Post
          > > Posted Oct 21, 2010 @ 02:11 PM
          > >
          > > MPNnow.com �
          > > Whitetail deer are one of the most widespread critters in North America.
          > > According to once-reliable sources, they are surpassed only by the black
          > > bear. I
          > > say once reliable because, during the past week, I have learned a bunch
          > of
          > > new
          > > and incredible information about this species.
          > >
          > > For instance, did you know that whitetails will eat birds? I didn't
          > either
          > > until
          > > I received a video showing a doe chasing an injured songbird. I believe
          > it
          > > was
          > > an eastern phoebe, but don't quote me on that one. Regardless, the deer
          > > managed
          > > to corner it, then grabbed it with its mouth, and proceeded to eat it, on
          > > the
          > > spot, feathers and all. Yuck!
          > >
          > > Of course I immediately suspected someone with too much time on their
          > hands
          > >
          > > doing a little creative photo-shopping with that video. But no, it was a
          > > real
          > > incident, witnessed by at least three people.
          > >
          > > I have witnessed a lot of strange deer activity throughout my career.
          > When
          > > a
          > > person is tucked into a nice ground-blind or handy tree in the pre-dawn
          > or
          > > dusk
          > > hours waiting on scoundrels to show up and do their deeds, you get to
          > > witness a
          > > lot of wildlife activity, and some of it can only be described as
          > strange.
          > >
          > > For example, did you know that whitetail bucks urinate two different
          > ways?
          > > Most
          > > of the time they assume a "four-feet on the ground" position, not unlike
          > a
          > > male
          > > horse, and just let it go. But I have also observed them lifting their
          > hind
          > > leg
          > > and peeing like a dog. Since just about all of my deer urination
          > > observations
          > > took place in the fall months, I have to assume that the rut may have
          > > influenced
          > > the leg-lifting activity. But at the same time, I have to chalk it up to
          > > strange
          > > behavior.
          > >
          > > A lot of hunters have wondered how, when a deer has its head down and is
          > > actually feeding, it can also spot the slightest movement of a person
          > > trying to
          > > get closer before taking a shot? The answer is that they have the ability
          > > to
          > > focus on both close-in and distant objects at the same time, including
          > > everything in-between.
          > >
          > > This trait is possible because the deer's eyes are set high and wide on
          > its
          > >
          > > head, giving it better than 300 degrees of vision. It comes in handy by
          > > permitting the deer to graze while watching for the approach of any
          > > predators,
          > > including hunters, doing both at the same time.
          > >
          > > There is one more fact about deer, and this one will probably blow your
          > > mind.
          > > Deer will actually go fishing! They use their hooves to disable fish such
          > > as
          > > trout. Then they will grab the fish with their mouths, chew it up, and
          > > swallow
          > > it. And believe it or not, the researchers who observed this activity
          > noted
          > > that
          > > whitetail deer commonly eat fish up to 14 inches long! Do those guys have
          > > too
          > > much free time on their hands, or what?
          > >
          > > Oh, and a few more tidbit about deer. They are ruminants with a
          > > four-chamber
          > > stomach, much like cattle. And their digestive tract is around 65 feet
          > > long. It
          > > normally takes around 36 hours for the grass, twigs, birds or fish they
          > ate
          > > to
          > > once again appear, this time as those shiny black pellets that hunters
          > are
          > > so
          > > familiar with.
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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