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RedneckReview: parading testosterone, ND style

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  • Imp Ster
    Bill to cover deer carcasses dies By BLAKE NICHOLSON, Associated Press Writer BISMARCK, N.D. - Troubled by the sight of bloody deer carcasses hanging off cars
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 10, 2007
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      Bill to cover deer carcasses dies
      By BLAKE NICHOLSON, Associated Press Writer

      BISMARCK, N.D. - Troubled by the sight of bloody deer carcasses
      hanging off cars and pickup trucks on North Dakota's highways, state
      legislator Duane DeKrey proposed a law requiring hunters to throw a
      tarp over their kills. He might as well have painted a bull's-eye on
      his back.

      The bill caused such an uproar that he withdrew it on Monday, just
      days later.

      "Some of it was even a lot more vitriolic than I ever dreamed it
      would have been," said DeKrey, a Republican representative from a
      rural district in and around the town of Pettibone. "It was quite
      evident which way the bill was going."

      This is, after all, a state of avid hunters, a place where the right
      to hunt is enshrined in the constitution. ("Hunting, trapping and
      fishing, and the taking of game and fish, are a valued part of our
      heritage and will be forever preserved for the people.") It is also a
      place where hunters proudly display their deer tied down to the roofs
      of their vehicles or thrown into the back of open pickups.

      DeKrey, a hunter himself, is not squeamish about deer carcasses but
      said the sight makes hunters look bad and could hurt the sport.

      "It's about keeping the testosterone lower when you're going down the
      highway and showing off your big buck," he said. "Some of it is a
      little over the top."

      Some hunters agreed with him that it is poor manners to display dead
      animals while hauling them home. Mike Paulson, a hunter from a town
      called Hunter, said covering up "wouldn't hurt anything, and would
      probably keep some people happy."

      But DeKrey said others called him a kook and laughed at him. Many
      bitterly complained that the state has no business telling them to
      cover up the carcasses.

      Ralph Muecke, a hunter from Gladstone who stows his deer carcasses in
      the back of a pickup, pronounced the bill "the silliest piece of
      legislation I've seen yet."

      People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals found itself siding with
      the hardest of the hard-core hunters against DeKrey's bill.

      "We encourage people, if they're going to kill defenseless animals,
      to parade the animal's carcass all over town, since uncovered bloody
      carcasses are more likely to wake people up to the cruelties of
      hunting," spokesman Bruce Friedrich said. "Clearly, covering up
      cruelty doesn't help animals at all."

      In decades past, many states actually required hunters to leave their
      game exposed, as a way to fight poaching.

      Steve Williams, president of the Wildlife Management Institute and a
      former director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the
      nationwide trend in the past couple of decades has been to promote
      the covering of dead animals, and not just to avoid offending others.

      "It keeps it out of the weather, and you end up with better meat for
      the table," he said.

      Since 2000, more than 100,000 deer a year have been killed in North
      Dakota, population 640,000. The number of licenses issued to hunt
      deer with guns climbed an all-time high in 2004 of nearly 144,000.

      DeKrey said he has witnessed grisly highway scenes during deer
      season, including carcasses towed haphazardly in a trailer. "Two does
      were hanging over the top, and there was blood running down from both
      of them on the side of the trailer," he said. "I thought, 'What kind
      of image does that give us?'"

      DeKrey said e-mails he received were equally divided, pro and con,
      and included a message from "a lady in Minot who said she was tired
      of her children being traumatized by going down the highway and
      seeing deer in various states of death."


      http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070110/ap_on_re_us/covering_dead_deer

      ...
    • Pat Scala
      The one next door had a deer slit down the middle hanging from its neck from a branch in a tree in the front yard for at least 5 days. Since the weather
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 10, 2007
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        The one next door had a deer slit down the middle hanging from its neck from
        a branch in a tree in the front yard for at least 5 days. Since the weather
        wasn't that cool when it was hung I am sure that the carcass attracted flies
        and other hungry things in the area. The flies were out there at the time
        because we were dragging them in with our fire wood. Now in Jersey the
        local board of health would have been out over a deer carcass hanging in the
        front yard shortly after it was displayed.







        -----Original Message-----
        From: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com [mailto:friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Imp Ster
        Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 4:13 PM
        To: friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Friends of Deer] RedneckReview: parading testosterone, ND style



        Bill to cover deer carcasses dies
        By BLAKE NICHOLSON, Associated Press Writer

        BISMARCK, N.D. - Troubled by the sight of bloody deer carcasses
        hanging off cars and pickup trucks on North Dakota's highways, state
        legislator Duane DeKrey proposed a law requiring hunters to throw a
        tarp over their kills. He might as well have painted a bull's-eye on
        his back.

        The bill caused such an uproar that he withdrew it on Monday, just
        days later.

        "Some of it was even a lot more vitriolic than I ever dreamed it
        would have been," said DeKrey, a Republican representative from a
        rural district in and around the town of Pettibone. "It was quite
        evident which way the bill was going."

        This is, after all, a state of avid hunters, a place where the right
        to hunt is enshrined in the constitution. ("Hunting, trapping and
        fishing, and the taking of game and fish, are a valued part of our
        heritage and will be forever preserved for the people.") It is also a
        place where hunters proudly display their deer tied down to the roofs
        of their vehicles or thrown into the back of open pickups.

        DeKrey, a hunter himself, is not squeamish about deer carcasses but
        said the sight makes hunters look bad and could hurt the sport.

        "It's about keeping the testosterone lower when you're going down the
        highway and showing off your big buck," he said. "Some of it is a
        little over the top."

        Some hunters agreed with him that it is poor manners to display dead
        animals while hauling them home. Mike Paulson, a hunter from a town
        called Hunter, said covering up "wouldn't hurt anything, and would
        probably keep some people happy."

        But DeKrey said others called him a kook and laughed at him. Many
        bitterly complained that the state has no business telling them to
        cover up the carcasses.

        Ralph Muecke, a hunter from Gladstone who stows his deer carcasses in
        the back of a pickup, pronounced the bill "the silliest piece of
        legislation I've seen yet."

        People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals found itself siding with
        the hardest of the hard-core hunters against DeKrey's bill.

        "We encourage people, if they're going to kill defenseless animals,
        to parade the animal's carcass all over town, since uncovered bloody
        carcasses are more likely to wake people up to the cruelties of
        hunting," spokesman Bruce Friedrich said. "Clearly, covering up
        cruelty doesn't help animals at all."

        In decades past, many states actually required hunters to leave their
        game exposed, as a way to fight poaching.

        Steve Williams, president of the Wildlife Management Institute and a
        former director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the
        nationwide trend in the past couple of decades has been to promote
        the covering of dead animals, and not just to avoid offending others.

        "It keeps it out of the weather, and you end up with better meat for
        the table," he said.

        Since 2000, more than 100,000 deer a year have been killed in North
        Dakota, population 640,000. The number of licenses issued to hunt
        deer with guns climbed an all-time high in 2004 of nearly 144,000.

        DeKrey said he has witnessed grisly highway scenes during deer
        season, including carcasses towed haphazardly in a trailer. "Two does
        were hanging over the top, and there was blood running down from both
        of them on the side of the trailer," he said. "I thought, 'What kind
        of image does that give us?'"

        DeKrey said e-mails he received were equally divided, pro and con,
        and included a message from "a lady in Minot who said she was tired
        of her children being traumatized by going down the highway and
        seeing deer in various states of death."

        http://news.
        <http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070110/ap_on_re_us/covering_dead_deer>
        yahoo.com/s/ap/20070110/ap_on_re_us/covering_dead_deer

        ...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Imp Ster
        hmm, i think that majik 5-day period is like the cooling off thingy. keep the bride hanging, let the nervous groom get over any cold feet ya know... last
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 10, 2007
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          hmm, i think that majik 5-day period is like the "cooling off" thingy.
          keep the bride hanging, let the nervous groom get over any "cold
          feet" ya know...

          last time i visited my dad's ranch in SD, the noble savage red-
          bellies hung 3 deer to "drain" off the porch of an upscale resort
          cabin adjacent to our place, inside which cabins were notices
          prohibiting storage or butchering of game on the premises.
          obviously the red-bellies wouldnt read, but thats no surprise.
          (they werent going hungry either from the looks of them hell-bellies.)
          anyway, after a few days, one of the deer fell off the hook and was
          left on the ground for another few days until the mighty hunting
          class acts left.
          resort owner has since clarified the rental contract.
          ( i think he made it in really big font and really short words too.)
          but in that killing season in the Black Hills, one almost gets used
          to loud-faced piss-drunken orangutango human swine in herds of SUVs
          pulling loaded dripping flatbeds.
          at the local gas pump, the blood pools in the gutter.
          brass balls, Amerikan style.

          but remember, "the deer hate us because we are free."
          oh wait, thats not it... gimme a second here...
          um... um...
          "we are doing it to keep the deer from starving..."
          um no wait, thats been proven as DNR redneck lies...
          oh wait , i know:
          "we gots ta kill them All Kaydee cuz... cuz... wull, just CUZ!"

          yeah, thats it.
          just CUZ.

          ...




          --- In friendsofdeer@yahoogroups.com, Pat Scala <patscala@...> wrote:
          >
          > The one next door had a deer slit down the middle hanging from its
          neck from
          > a branch in a tree in the front yard for at least 5 days. Since
          the weather
          > wasn't that cool when it was hung I am sure that the carcass
          attracted flies
          > and other hungry things in the area. The flies were out there at
          the time
          > because we were dragging them in with our fire wood. Now in Jersey
          the
          > local board of health would have been out over a deer carcass
          hanging in the
          > front yard shortly after it was displayed.
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