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Slowing down water flow

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  • renton_et
    Hello, I am new to the group, so please excuse me if this question has been asked before. I have a fairly tall approx 50 gal aquarium, and previously had a
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2009
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      Hello,

      I am new to the group, so please excuse me if this question has been asked before.

      I have a fairly tall approx 50 gal aquarium, and previously had a BioWheel filter. The BioWheel died, and was a hassle to prime, so I decided to get a Fluval 305. It does a fantastic job of keeping the water clean, but the problem is that is produces too much of a current in the water for my clams, shrimp and snails. So I'm trying to figure out a way to diffuse the current.

      I've thought about getting a clear plastic cylinder that matches the diameter of the output hose from the Fluval, and drilling holes in it so that the outflow is in a bunch of different directions. Would this work? Is there a better way to reduce the current generated by the filter?

      Thanks,
      Erick
    • Patrick A. Timlin
      ... Snails don t usually care, clam which are filter feeders probably like a good amount of current and the shrimp probably could make do. But, you will find
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2009
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        --- On Wed, 9/2/09, renton_et <erick.thompson@...> wrote:
        > I decided to get a Fluval 305.
        > but the problem is that is produces too much of a current
        > in the water for my clams, shrimp and snails. So I'm trying
        > to figure out a way to diffuse the current.

        Snails don't usually care, clam which are filter feeders probably like a good amount of current and the shrimp probably could make do. But, you will find that once the filter runs for a while the flow will slow down a fair amount as the hoses and such get dirty. New filters always seem so powerful.

        But to answer your question. A couple ways come to mind.

        One is some sort of valve on the OUTPUT of the filter. Key is you always throttle down the output of a canister, not the input.

        Two is to position the filter lower if you currently have it about level with the bottom of the tank. To moving a filter from behind the tank sitting on the same surface to down below the tank will decrease flow since the filter has to pump the water much higher.

        Three is add more tubing. Longer lengths of tubing increase the friction for flow so adding a lot of tubing (or more elbows and fittings) will cause flow losses.

        Four, split the output to two or more outputs so two outputs split the flow in half AND add a bit more friction in extra fittings and such.

        And of course your suggestion would probably work as well.

        What ever you pick, as I said, since the flow rate may drop after a few weeks, you might want to implement something that is easily reversible in case whatever you do causes the flow rate to drop too much.

        Best of luck,
        Patrick
      • pam andress
        Look at this. It may be just what you are looking for. http://www.theaquaticdepot.com/fluval-external-canister-filter-spray-bar-kit-a.html Pam To:
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 7, 2009
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          Look at this. It may be just what you are looking for.



          http://www.theaquaticdepot.com/fluval-external-canister-filter-spray-bar-kit-a.html



          Pam



          To: freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com
          From: erick.thompson@...
          Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2009 04:50:15 +0000
          Subject: [Freshwater Aquariums] Slowing down water flow





          Hello,

          I am new to the group, so please excuse me if this question has been asked before.

          I have a fairly tall approx 50 gal aquarium, and previously had a BioWheel filter. The BioWheel died, and was a hassle to prime, so I decided to get a Fluval 305. It does a fantastic job of keeping the water clean, but the problem is that is produces too much of a current in the water for my clams, shrimp and snails. So I'm trying to figure out a way to diffuse the current.

          I've thought about getting a clear plastic cylinder that matches the diameter of the output hose from the Fluval, and drilling holes in it so that the outflow is in a bunch of different directions. Would this work? Is there a better way to reduce the current generated by the filter?

          Thanks,
          Erick










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