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[Freshwater Aquariums] Re: Hello

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  • William
    The bamboo is not a true aquatic plant so I would find a true aqutic plant that will not die easily in your tank to act as a filter such as water sprite which
    Message 1 of 27 , Oct 30, 2008
      The bamboo is not a true aquatic plant so I would find a true aqutic
      plant that will not die easily in your tank to act as a filter such as
      water sprite which you can either let it float or plant it.


      --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Roberts" <woad@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I like the emperor filters. I have 2 400's on my 55 gallon and the
      tanks
      > stays nice and clean.I even put some pothos in the filter reservoir
      to make
      > them look nicer :-D Bamboo would look nice too. That also adds extra
      > filtration as the plants use the waste material in the water as
      fertilizer.
    • blue_lkb
      Hi Patrick, Finally got a little time to check out those sites you mentioned, to look for a better heater. Also found some other stuff I have to have
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 8, 2008
        Hi Patrick,

        Finally got a little time to check out those sites you mentioned, to
        look for a better heater. Also found some other stuff I "have" to
        have now...lol.

        The Jager line heaters I saw on That Fish Place looked like clip-ons.
        Below is a link to the pages listing heaters that Drs. Smith & Foster
        or That Fish Place have. Can you recommend a model on there? I don't
        want to buy a piece of junk that's going to fail again. Also, what do
        you think of the ones that you put under the substrate??

        http://www.thatpetplace.com/pet/cat/info/23891/category.web
        http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/pet_supplies.cfm?c=3578+3743
        >
        > As to filters, I wouldn't generalize and say all hang on the back
        filters are junk. For smaller tanks, my personal preference has been
        the AquaClear line for many years now.

        I tried to find the brand on my filter and couldn't. It came with my
        55 gallon tank, which I bought used, so I'm not sure which brand it
        is.

        Could this be why I'm having trouble keeping my nitrates low? I can
        occasionally get them around 10ppm, but not usually; usually they are
        at 20, sometimes 20-40. I've tried changing 20% of the water every 3
        days and haven't really had much luck. I thought I had read that it's
        best to keep nitrates below 10ppm - ? I vacuum the gravel when I
        clean it (since I've had the oto cats, etc., even though I only have
        2, they seem to keep the algae cleaned up really well so I don't have
        to deal with cleaning the sides of the tank) and change at least 20%
        of the water, sometimes a little more. My tanks aren't overstocked -
        55 gallon has around 8 zebra danios (I lost some since I originally
        put them in and they are zippy little guys, so I have a lot of
        trouble accurately counting them), give or take, 4 cory cats, 4 Kuhli
        loaches, 1 cherry barb and 2 oto cats. I also have plants, which I
        read help keep nitrates down but don't seem to be doing that. So
        perhaps I need another filter on my tanks?


        > also if you a model using thin cartridges.

        Yep, mine does.

        Thanks!

        Best regards,

        Laura
      • Patrick A. Timlin
        Ebo Jagers are fully submersible and are not clip ons. They do come with a pair of suction cups to attach it to the side of the aquarium (and like all suction
        Message 3 of 27 , Nov 9, 2008
          Ebo Jagers are fully submersible and are not clip ons. They do come with a pair of suction cups to attach it to the side of the aquarium (and like all suction cups in aquariums, will stop working in about 6 months).

          VisaTherms have a long popular track record and are a good brand to try.

          I don't have a lot of experience with many other brands since my Ebo Jagers tend to last forever and I rarely need to buy new heaters.

          Your Nitrate levels sound perfectly fine. Nitrates are pretty much always in the tank and it is only the people with super heavily planted tank that sometimes actually have to supplement nitrates for the plants. Shooting for under 10 ppm is not usually possible. Most tanks are around 10-20ppm AFTER a water change. Many common hardy fish can tolerate levels close to 100 although I wouldn't recommend that long term. But to see your nitrates go as high as, say, 50-60ppm before a water change would probably be typical. You can of course change more water or do it more often or both and shoot to never let the levels get above, say, 25-30ppm, but I don't think trying to keep it under 10ppm is realistic unless you have a lot of plants and/or stock very lightly. Your set up sounds fine.

          Patrick Timlin

          http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/

          --- On Sat, 11/8/08, blue_lkb <blue_lkb@...> wrote:
          From: blue_lkb <blue_lkb@...>
          Subject: [Freshwater Aquariums] Re: Hello
          To: freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, November 8, 2008, 1:06 PM











          Hi Patrick,



          Finally got a little time to check out those sites you mentioned, to

          look for a better heater. Also found some other stuff I "have" to

          have now...lol.



          The Jager line heaters I saw on That Fish Place looked like clip-ons.

          Below is a link to the pages listing heaters that Drs. Smith & Foster

          or That Fish Place have. Can you recommend a model on there? I don't

          want to buy a piece of junk that's going to fail again. Also, what do

          you think of the ones that you put under the substrate??



          http://www.thatpetp lace.com/ pet/cat/info/ 23891/category. web

          http://www.drsfoste rsmith.com/ product/pet_ supplies. cfm?c=3578+ 3743

          >

          > As to filters, I wouldn't generalize and say all hang on the back

          filters are junk. For smaller tanks, my personal preference has been

          the AquaClear line for many years now.



          I tried to find the brand on my filter and couldn't. It came with my

          55 gallon tank, which I bought used, so I'm not sure which brand it

          is.



          Could this be why I'm having trouble keeping my nitrates low? I can

          occasionally get them around 10ppm, but not usually; usually they are

          at 20, sometimes 20-40. I've tried changing 20% of the water every 3

          days and haven't really had much luck. I thought I had read that it's

          best to keep nitrates below 10ppm - ? I vacuum the gravel when I

          clean it (since I've had the oto cats, etc., even though I only have

          2, they seem to keep the algae cleaned up really well so I don't have

          to deal with cleaning the sides of the tank) and change at least 20%

          of the water, sometimes a little more. My tanks aren't overstocked -

          55 gallon has around 8 zebra danios (I lost some since I originally

          put them in and they are zippy little guys, so I have a lot of

          trouble accurately counting them), give or take, 4 cory cats, 4 Kuhli

          loaches, 1 cherry barb and 2 oto cats. I also have plants, which I

          read help keep nitrates down but don't seem to be doing that. So

          perhaps I need another filter on my tanks?



          > also if you a model using thin cartridges.



          Yep, mine does.



          Thanks!



          Best regards,



          Laura


























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • blue_lkb
          Hi Patrick, Thanks again, I will check into those heaters and probably buy a couple. ... Oh, awesome! I was kind of concerned about that, since the only
          Message 4 of 27 , Nov 9, 2008
            Hi Patrick,

            Thanks again, I will check into those heaters and probably buy a
            couple.

            > Your Nitrate levels sound perfectly fine.

            Oh, awesome! I was kind of concerned about that, since the only
            definitive info I'd read said something like under 10ppm and I just
            could not get it close to that. I guess I can stop worrying now.

            Best regards,

            Laura
          • Tom Reagin
            How high is too high for NitrAtes?  Realistically how low can they be controlled? Thomas G. Reagin, O.D. 104 Church Street Decatur, GA 30030 Voice
            Message 5 of 27 , Nov 10, 2008
              How high is too high for NitrAtes?  Realistically how low can they be controlled?

              Thomas G. Reagin, O.D.
              104 Church Street
              Decatur, GA 30030

              Voice (404)378-3694
              Fax (404)373-0741






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Patrick A. Timlin
              ... Unfortunately this isn t an easy question to answer because it depends on the species of fish you keep. For example, fish that come from slow moving bodies
              Message 6 of 27 , Nov 11, 2008
                --- On Mon, 11/10/08, Tom Reagin <tgreagin@...> wrote:
                > How high is too high for NitrAtes?

                Unfortunately this isn't an easy question to answer because it depends on the species of fish you keep. For example, fish that come from slow moving bodies of water (ponds, small lakes, etc.) or from small bodies of water (rice paddies, etc.) will have a much higher tolerance to nitrates than fish that come from fast moving cleaner bodies of water like streams (since the water is constantly turning over in a stream).

                So you will find, for example, a fish like Tiger Barbs or Bettas to not really care about nitrate levels if they don't get too extreme. While fish like Clown Loaches are not very tolerant of higher nitrates.

                In addition, fish fry are generally more effected by nitrates than older fish, so you want to keep tanks with growing fry low in nitrates with plenty of water changes.

                Depending on the fish species, the upper limit of nitrate could be anywhere from 40-60ppm to as high as well over 100 ppm of nitrates, although I wouldn't suggest you allow your tanks to get that high, just that if they did, your tank of Tiger Barbs (for example) would probably be fine, but your tank of Clown Loaches would be in trouble.


                > Realistically how low can they be controlled?

                Again that depends on how much water changing you do, if you keep a lot of live plants, and how good your water is to begin with. You could keep your nitrates at near zero if you did a combo of any of understocked the tank, fed lightly, kept live plants, and changed water frequently. My comment before about having a tank hovering in the 20-50ppm range normally was considering your standard home aquarium, stocked fully, water changes of only 10-20% on a weekly basis, well fed daily, and little to no live plants.

                And my comment about how good your water is to begin with means does your tap water have nitrates in it already. Here in the USA, most of our water supplies are low or ascent of nitrates and I think we have EPA mandated low limits allowed. On the other hand, in the UK for example, it wouldn't be uncommon to measure 10+ppm of nitrate right out of the tap. So in a case like that, without live plants to take up some of the nitrates, you couldn't get the tank below 10 with water changes alone, not matter how much you changed.

                Patrick Timlin
                http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
              • Tom Reagin
                Thanks, well thought out reply! Thomas G. Reagin, O.D. 104 Church Street Decatur, GA 30030 Voice (404)378-3694 Fax (404)373-0741 [Non-text portions of this
                Message 7 of 27 , Nov 12, 2008
                  Thanks, well thought out reply!

                  Thomas G. Reagin, O.D.
                  104 Church Street
                  Decatur, GA 30030

                  Voice (404)378-3694
                  Fax (404)373-0741






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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