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  • womanseekinggod
    Hello, my name is Onna and I just joined your group in hopes that some of my questions could be answered. We have a 30 gallon tank that used to have one huge
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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      Hello, my name is Onna and I just joined your group in hopes that some
      of my questions could be answered.

      We have a 30 gallon tank that used to have one huge feeder goldfish (8
      inches long), one butterfly koi (long story) and one pleco. Today we
      sent the goldfish and Koi to a big pond.

      What I am wanting to do is refill my tank, but this time not with
      goldfish, I found that I was changing my filter every week while I had
      goldfish. However, all my knowledge is limited to goldfish. I would
      like to put in some plants, but I'm not sure what kinds work well with
      plecos. Also, what other types of fish get along well with plecos? My
      eldest son really wants a puffer fish (I am assuming the one we saw in
      the store was a freshwater type).

      I'm also considering putting my pleco in a smaller tank temporarily
      and cleaning out the 30 gallon one totally and then starting
      completely from scratch again. However, I worry that by doing that it
      will disrupt his bacterial conditions and just cause more trouble than
      necessary.

      Please, does anyone have some advice for me?

      Thank you for your help!
      Onna
    • Patrick Timlin
      ... Excellent choice! They will be much better accomidated in a pond than in a tank. ... The problem with larger plecos is that they tend to uproot and knock
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 4, 2007
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        --- "womanseekinggod" <womanseekinggod@...> wrote:
        > We have a 30 gallon tank that used to have one huge feeder
        > goldfish (8 inches long), one butterfly koi (long story) and
        > one pleco. Today we sent the goldfish and Koi to a big pond.

        Excellent choice! They will be much better accomidated in a pond than
        in a tank.


        > What I am wanting to do is refill my tank, but this time not with
        > goldfish, I found that I was changing my filter every week while I
        > had goldfish. However, all my knowledge is limited to goldfish. I
        > would like to put in some plants, but I'm not sure what kinds work
        > well with plecos.

        The problem with larger plecos is that they tend to uproot and knock
        around plants since most common plecos are fairly big and armoured and
        can push their way around without their "skin" being hurt. So they do.

        Therefore plants to consider are floating plants, plants that do not
        need to be planted like Java Ferns, Anubius, etc. or if planted plants
        you might consider putting them in pots so the pleco can shove them
        around as much as it wishes.


        > Also, what other types of fish get along well with plecos?

        Generally Plecos ignore all other fish with the exception of many of
        the larger species being intolerant of other plecos. Likewise, most
        fish will tend to ignore plecos as well. Exceptions might be stuff
        like breeding cichlids.


        > My eldest son really wants a puffer fish (I am assuming the one
        > we saw in the store was a freshwater type).

        You assume that, but unfortunately it is often hard to determine if a
        particular puffer in a store is truly a freshwater species. Many are
        brackish. There are freshwater ones though.


        > I'm also considering putting my pleco in a smaller tank temporarily
        > and cleaning out the 30 gallon one totally and then starting
        > completely from scratch again. However, I worry that by doing that
        > it will disrupt his bacterial conditions and just cause more
        > trouble than necessary.

        If your past fish were all healthy and the tank is in good shape,
        there is not really a great reason to tear it down and start from scratch.

        Patrick
      • womanseekinggod
        Hello Patrick, Thank you for the advice! May I ask another of question(s) though? ... scratch. We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 9, 2007
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          Hello Patrick,

          Thank you for the advice! May I ask another of question(s) though?

          > If your past fish were all healthy and the tank is in good shape,
          > there is not really a great reason to tear it down and start from
          scratch.

          We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost lost
          all of my fish. Since then, though, I have had a terrible problem with
          algae. It is dark green and crusty-like. My pleco doesn't seem to be
          interested in eating it and I have trouble scrapping it off the sides
          of the tank with my little scrapper thingy. Would this suggest an
          unhealthy tank? What should I do to get rid of it?

          Thank you for putting up with such a novice! :-)

          Onna
        • Patrick Timlin
          ... Algae is not a sign of poor tank conditions. In fact every healthy tank has some level of algae. However tanks can be a bit unbalanced in certain things
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 9, 2007
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            --- "womanseekinggod" <womanseekinggod@...> wrote:
            > We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost lost
            > all of my fish. Since then, though, I have had a terrible problem with
            > algae. It is dark green and crusty-like. My pleco doesn't seem to be
            > interested in eating it and I have trouble scrapping it off the sides
            > of the tank with my little scrapper thingy. Would this suggest an
            > unhealthy tank? What should I do to get rid of it?

            Algae is not a sign of poor tank conditions. In fact every healthy
            tank has some level of algae. However tanks can be a bit unbalanced in
            certain things (too much phosphates, too little light, too much light,
            etc.) where algae can take hold and grow to unsightly conditions.

            It is hard to say if you took down the tank, cleaned everything and
            then set it back up again, if it would happen again. It might.

            As too how to get rid of it, there are a number of things you could
            try. Many may not work, some might. More live plants to compete with
            the algae may work, especially fast growing ones like water sprite,
            duck weed, etc. Feed less. Change water more often. Charge the source
            of your water supply for the fish tank. Change your lighting (renew
            the lamps, increase or decrease the amount, etc.).

            What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on a day?

            Patrick
          • womanseekinggod
            Hello Patrick, ... a day? My hubby tells me that it is a full spectrum light. It s on about 12 – 16 hours a day. The kids turn it on sometime after breakfast
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 9, 2007
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              Hello Patrick,

              > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
              a day?

              My hubby tells me that it is a full spectrum light. It's on about 12 –
              16 hours a day. The kids turn it on sometime after breakfast and I
              turn it off when I go to bed. It only gets indirect afternoon
              sunlight, I had been told that it's not a good idea to have an
              aquarium next to a window that gets direct sunlight. Now that the two
              big fish are gone though, we haven't been turning on the light until
              later in the day. The tank is so empty with just my little pleco, I
              even think he might be lonely...

              Onna



              --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Timlin"
              <ptimlin@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- "womanseekinggod" <womanseekinggod@> wrote:
              > > We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost lost
              > > all of my fish. Since then, though, I have had a terrible problem with
              > > algae. It is dark green and crusty-like. My pleco doesn't seem to be
              > > interested in eating it and I have trouble scrapping it off the sides
              > > of the tank with my little scrapper thingy. Would this suggest an
              > > unhealthy tank? What should I do to get rid of it?
              >
              > Algae is not a sign of poor tank conditions. In fact every healthy
              > tank has some level of algae. However tanks can be a bit unbalanced in
              > certain things (too much phosphates, too little light, too much light,
              > etc.) where algae can take hold and grow to unsightly conditions.
              >
              > It is hard to say if you took down the tank, cleaned everything and
              > then set it back up again, if it would happen again. It might.
              >
              > As too how to get rid of it, there are a number of things you could
              > try. Many may not work, some might. More live plants to compete with
              > the algae may work, especially fast growing ones like water sprite,
              > duck weed, etc. Feed less. Change water more often. Charge the source
              > of your water supply for the fish tank. Change your lighting (renew
              > the lamps, increase or decrease the amount, etc.).
              >
              > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
              a day?
              >
              > Patrick
              >
            • Rich Hoskins
              I used to have a bit of a algae problem so I bought two algae eaters and they did the trick because pleco s aren t real big fans of algae as a source of diet
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 10, 2007
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                I used to have a bit of a algae problem so I bought two algae eaters and they did the trick because pleco's aren't real big fans of algae as a source of diet like algae eaters are

                womanseekinggod <womanseekinggod@...> wrote: Hello Patrick,

                > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
                a day?

                My hubby tells me that it is a full spectrum light. It's on about 12 –
                16 hours a day. The kids turn it on sometime after breakfast and I
                turn it off when I go to bed. It only gets indirect afternoon
                sunlight, I had been told that it's not a good idea to have an
                aquarium next to a window that gets direct sunlight. Now that the two
                big fish are gone though, we haven't been turning on the light until
                later in the day. The tank is so empty with just my little pleco, I
                even think he might be lonely...

                Onna

                --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Timlin"
                <ptimlin@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- "womanseekinggod" <womanseekinggod@> wrote:
                > > We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost lost
                > > all of my fish. Since then, though, I have had a terrible problem with
                > > algae. It is dark green and crusty-like. My pleco doesn't seem to be
                > > interested in eating it and I have trouble scrapping it off the sides
                > > of the tank with my little scrapper thingy. Would this suggest an
                > > unhealthy tank? What should I do to get rid of it?
                >
                > Algae is not a sign of poor tank conditions. In fact every healthy
                > tank has some level of algae. However tanks can be a bit unbalanced in
                > certain things (too much phosphates, too little light, too much light,
                > etc.) where algae can take hold and grow to unsightly conditions.
                >
                > It is hard to say if you took down the tank, cleaned everything and
                > then set it back up again, if it would happen again. It might.
                >
                > As too how to get rid of it, there are a number of things you could
                > try. Many may not work, some might. More live plants to compete with
                > the algae may work, especially fast growing ones like water sprite,
                > duck weed, etc. Feed less. Change water more often. Charge the source
                > of your water supply for the fish tank. Change your lighting (renew
                > the lamps, increase or decrease the amount, etc.).
                >
                > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
                a day?
                >
                > Patrick
                >






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              • Rich Hoskins
                I have a regular light that came with the tank hood but to be honest I only turn on the light when I am observe the fish but usually I can see them without it
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 11, 2007
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                  I have a regular light that came with the tank hood but to be honest I only turn on the light when I am observe the fish but usually I can see them without it on. I do turn it on more regular in the winter months but for now it stays off the majority of the time but any sunlight or even reflection can ignite some algae if your not careful

                  Rich Hoskins <dmxdragon2@...> wrote: I used to have a bit of a algae problem so I bought two algae eaters and they did the trick because pleco's aren't real big fans of algae as a source of diet like algae eaters are

                  womanseekinggod <womanseekinggod@...> wrote: Hello Patrick,

                  > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
                  a day?

                  My hubby tells me that it is a full spectrum light. It's on about 12 –
                  16 hours a day. The kids turn it on sometime after breakfast and I
                  turn it off when I go to bed. It only gets indirect afternoon
                  sunlight, I had been told that it's not a good idea to have an
                  aquarium next to a window that gets direct sunlight. Now that the two
                  big fish are gone though, we haven't been turning on the light until
                  later in the day. The tank is so empty with just my little pleco, I
                  even think he might be lonely...

                  Onna

                  --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Timlin"
                  <ptimlin@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- "womanseekinggod" <womanseekinggod@> wrote:
                  > > We did battle ick for a little while about a year ago. I almost lost
                  > > all of my fish. Since then, though, I have had a terrible problem with
                  > > algae. It is dark green and crusty-like. My pleco doesn't seem to be
                  > > interested in eating it and I have trouble scrapping it off the sides
                  > > of the tank with my little scrapper thingy. Would this suggest an
                  > > unhealthy tank? What should I do to get rid of it?
                  >
                  > Algae is not a sign of poor tank conditions. In fact every healthy
                  > tank has some level of algae. However tanks can be a bit unbalanced in
                  > certain things (too much phosphates, too little light, too much light,
                  > etc.) where algae can take hold and grow to unsightly conditions.
                  >
                  > It is hard to say if you took down the tank, cleaned everything and
                  > then set it back up again, if it would happen again. It might.
                  >
                  > As too how to get rid of it, there are a number of things you could
                  > try. Many may not work, some might. More live plants to compete with
                  > the algae may work, especially fast growing ones like water sprite,
                  > duck weed, etc. Feed less. Change water more often. Charge the source
                  > of your water supply for the fish tank. Change your lighting (renew
                  > the lamps, increase or decrease the amount, etc.).
                  >
                  > What sort of lighting do you have on the tank and how long is it on
                  a day?
                  >
                  > Patrick
                  >

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                • Patrick Timlin
                  ... Since the light is off a lot more than it uses to be, let s see if you see the amount of algae decrease. Normally with live plants in a tank you want maybe
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 11, 2007
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                    --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "womanseekinggod" wrote:
                    > My hubby tells me that it is a full spectrum light. It's on about
                    > 12 – 16 hours a day. The kids turn it on sometime after breakfast
                    > and I turn it off when I go to bed. It only gets indirect afternoon
                    > sunlight, I had been told that it's not a good idea to have an
                    > aquarium next to a window that gets direct sunlight. Now that the two
                    > big fish are gone though, we haven't been turning on the light until
                    > later in the day. The tank is so empty with just my little pleco, I
                    > even think he might be lonely...

                    Since the light is off a lot more than it uses to be, let's see if you
                    see the amount of algae decrease. Normally with live plants in a tank
                    you want maybe about 12 hours of light. Anything more and you are just
                    feeding the algae, especially if you don't have plants in there. With
                    a plant-less tank I would aim for something closer to 10 hours (or
                    less if you like).

                    This is the perfect application of a light/appliance timer which you
                    can usually get at Home Depot, etc. for about $5. You know those ones
                    with the big dial on them and you move the little red and black tabs
                    to set ON/OFF times? Put one of those on the tank lights, set up your
                    light period and then forget about having to turn on/off the lights.
                    If you like the lights on later in the evening, then pick something
                    like 11am to 11pm, which is about what I have most of my tanks set
                    for. This gives the fish all morning to wake up with the natural
                    brightening of the room before the lights switch on.

                    Natural daylight is not necessarily bad unless it causes problems like
                    excess algae that you don't like, but this can be controlled with
                    blinds or window tint type film on the back of the tank (facing the
                    window, etc. If you had live plants, natural light might be a big help
                    to them.

                    Patrick
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