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Sick Tank, Help?

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  • ahorseofcourse66
    I have a small 10 gallon in my bedroom. It has been set up for over a year. I change water about everyother week at least 10% and clean filter when needed.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 5, 2007
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      I have a small 10 gallon in my bedroom. It has been set up for over a
      year. I change water about everyother week at least 10% and clean
      filter when needed. For about the last 4 months I have had a problem
      with fish dieing off and on. I keep mostly mollies and guppies in
      this tank. They seem to act like they don't feel good for about a
      week and then die. They act like they have no energy and loss weight
      and seem to have a hard time breathing. I have a female mollie I
      raised and she looks like her tail just kinduf drops and she hasn't
      much energy when it coms to swimming. Most of the fish in the tank are
      home raised and the bought fish in the tank have been in it for
      several months. I have noticed no fungus and I have treated the tank
      more than once with Jungle parasite tablets. Also have tested water
      and everything checks out fine. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks Mick
    • charles fonaas
      ... over a ... problem ... weight ... are ... tank ... Do you have any salt in the water? Most livebearers, especially mollies, prefer a bit of salt in the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2007
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        --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "ahorseofcourse66"
        <ahorseofcourse66@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a small 10 gallon in my bedroom. It has been set up for
        over
        a
        > year. I change water about everyother week at least 10% and clean
        > filter when needed. For about the last 4 months I have had a
        problem
        > with fish dieing off and on. I keep mostly mollies and guppies in
        > this tank. They seem to act like they don't feel good for about a
        > week and then die. They act like they have no energy and loss
        weight
        > and seem to have a hard time breathing. I have a female mollie I
        > raised and she looks like her tail just kinduf drops and she hasn't
        > much energy when it coms to swimming. Most of the fish in the tank
        are
        > home raised and the bought fish in the tank have been in it for
        > several months. I have noticed no fungus and I have treated the
        tank
        > more than once with Jungle parasite tablets. Also have tested water
        > and everything checks out fine. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks Mick
        >
        Do you have any salt in the water? Most livebearers, especially
        mollies, prefer a bit of salt in the aquarium. In fact, most
        freshwater
        aquariums will benefit from some salt in the water. Make sure it is
        UNiodized. About a tablespoon to five gallons should do. Make sure
        you dissolve it in a small volume of water before you pour it in.
        Good luck.
        Chuck.
      • Patrick Timlin
        ... Chuck, If I could disagree with you a bit. It isn t so much that Mollies prefer salt, it is that they really do need harder water than most fish and salt
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 8, 2007
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          --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "charles fonaas" wrote:
          > Do you have any salt in the water? Most livebearers, especially
          > mollies, prefer a bit of salt in the aquarium. In fact, most
          > freshwater
          > aquariums will benefit from some salt in the water. Make sure it is
          > UNiodized. About a tablespoon to five gallons should do. Make sure
          > you dissolve it in a small volume of water before you pour it in.

          Chuck,

          If I could disagree with you a bit. It isn't so much that Mollies
          prefer salt, it is that they really do need harder water than most
          fish and salt is one way to artificially simulate hard water and can
          be used to prop up water that normally is too soft. I would also add
          that Mollies generally do not do well in cooler water and should be
          kept at a minimum of 78°F with something closer to 80°F being much
          better.

          There was a very good article on this in Freshwater & Marine
          Aquariums from 1991 in the Live-bearers column which I scanned &
          saved since this comes up so often. I have uploaded to our files
          section as a JPG. Check it out as it is a good read...

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/freshwateraquariums/files/

          I would also add that while salt can have some benefits, most
          freshwater tanks do perfectly fine without adding salt if conditions
          are right for the fish and the tank is well maintained, especially
          with partial water changes and keeping fish in water that is well
          suited for them (e.g. not keeping Mollies in soft water).

          And finally, un-iodized salt is usually not an issue since the amount
          of iodine in minimal and wouldn't be enough to effect anything.
          Considering that many Reef keepers with fish in their reef tanks DOSE
          their tanks with iodine for the inverts, the amount of iodine in some
          table salt is insignificant. Now you might argue the anti-clumping
          additives used in salt could be an issue, but I wouldn't worry about
          iodine.

          Patrick
        • charles fonaas
          ... is ... sure ... can ... add ... conditions ... amount ... DOSE ... some ... about ... Yeah. I really wasn t trying to debate the issue or start a debate. I
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 8, 2007
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            --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Timlin"
            <ptimlin@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, "charles fonaas" wrote:
            > > Do you have any salt in the water? Most livebearers, especially
            > > mollies, prefer a bit of salt in the aquarium. In fact, most
            > > freshwater
            > > aquariums will benefit from some salt in the water. Make sure it
            is
            > > UNiodized. About a tablespoon to five gallons should do. Make
            sure
            > > you dissolve it in a small volume of water before you pour it in.
            >
            > Chuck,
            >
            > If I could disagree with you a bit. It isn't so much that Mollies
            > prefer salt, it is that they really do need harder water than most
            > fish and salt is one way to artificially simulate hard water and
            can
            > be used to prop up water that normally is too soft. I would also
            add
            > that Mollies generally do not do well in cooler water and should be
            > kept at a minimum of 78°F with something closer to 80°F being much
            > better.
            >
            > There was a very good article on this in Freshwater & Marine
            > Aquariums from 1991 in the Live-bearers column which I scanned &
            > saved since this comes up so often. I have uploaded to our files
            > section as a JPG. Check it out as it is a good read...
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/freshwateraquariums/files/
            >
            > I would also add that while salt can have some benefits, most
            > freshwater tanks do perfectly fine without adding salt if
            conditions
            > are right for the fish and the tank is well maintained, especially
            > with partial water changes and keeping fish in water that is well
            > suited for them (e.g. not keeping Mollies in soft water).
            >
            > And finally, un-iodized salt is usually not an issue since the
            amount
            > of iodine in minimal and wouldn't be enough to effect anything.
            > Considering that many Reef keepers with fish in their reef tanks
            DOSE
            > their tanks with iodine for the inverts, the amount of iodine in
            some
            > table salt is insignificant. Now you might argue the anti-clumping
            > additives used in salt could be an issue, but I wouldn't worry
            about
            > iodine.
            >
            > Patrick
            >
            Yeah. I really wasn't trying to debate the issue or start a debate. I
            was merely pointing out a proven method for improving the health of
            livebearers. This person is trying to keep his fish from dying which
            was my only aim. I don't believe that there is an aquarium shop
            around that would disagree. Every one I've ever been in has always
            recommended it in any aquarium. The only negative I've ever heard is
            that cats generally don't like it and consequently the amount should
            be kept lower if cats are in the tank. In addition, I don't believe I
            have ever heard anyone recommend using iodized salt in a freshwater
            aquarium. Perhaps the amount is insignificant but I still wouldn't
            recommend it. Chuck
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