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Re: [Freshwater Aquariums] Good Starter fish for tropical aquarium

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  • bodfrass
    ... months ... Hmmm I ve been lead to beleave that Neon Tetras are ideal for kicking of a new aquarium and give the filter something to fiter as they are hardy
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 4, 2006
      >
      > We've got a couple neon tetras, I heard that we should have waited 6
      months
      > before getting those.

      Hmmm I've been lead to beleave that Neon Tetras are ideal for
      kicking of a new aquarium and give the filter something to fiter as
      they are hardy enought to tolerat an unmature tank.
    • Patrick A. Timlin
      ... OK a few things. Most commonly sold fish, like tetras, barbs, etc. tend to be schooling fish and do best if kept in groups of their own species. This tends
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 4, 2006
        --- Scott Miller <scottm@...> wrote:
        > We've got a couple neon tetras, I heard that we should have waited
        > 6 months before getting those.we've got 1 "Mickey Mouse" Platy,
        > a red eyed tetra, and a painted Glass Tetra.

        OK a few things. Most commonly sold fish, like tetras, barbs, etc.
        tend to be schooling fish and do best if kept in groups of their own
        species. This tends to be hard for peeople starting out with small
        tanks because they want a lot of different fish and end up going with
        a Noah's ark setup, two of this, one of that, two more of this, etc.
        Unfortunately most of those fish do not do very well as singles or
        just pairs. Ideally you would want to add 4-6 of those species but
        with a ten gallon tank only able to support 8-12 fish (depending on
        who you ask that number can range from as few as 5 to as many as 20
        depending on opinion and species), you only have enough room for
        maybe one or two types of fish kept in schools. But many newbies see
        all the great fish and want a little of many.

        Just about all the fish you listed fall into the above catagory.
        So my opinions on what you have now...

        "Painted" fish are what they say, artifically dyed, injected or
        dipped fish to give them those unnatural colors. In many cases this
        weakens the fish and they may not live very long. If they do, the
        color will fade away over time. I personally do not recommend these
        fish at all. But again, if you want them, they should be in a group.
        Three would be an absolute bare minimum, 4 or 5, or more is better.

        Neons definately need more. With just two, they might get a bit nippy
        with other fish, so in addition to having more of their own kind
        around to make them feel secure and safe, it will also help keep them
        from picking on other fish. Neons really should be in no less than
        about 5 fish. 1000+ would be ideal of course! :)

        Red Eye tetras get a lot larger than the other tetras and need to
        school. If your pet store is willing to take fish back, this one
        might be a good candidate since it will tend to be bigger and in a
        school would use up most of your fish space. I have found these fish
        to be a bit overly shy so not nearly as fun as other fish. They do
        better if the tank is well planted, not too bright, and kept in large
        schools.

        Platys, in my opinion, are probably the best live bearers for new
        people and for smaller tanks. Great fish that I highly recommend.
        They tend to do better than tetras when kept by themselves but I
        would really consider a trio, one male and two females to make them
        happy. They probably will have babies, but if you let things alone,
        other fish will probably pick off a lot of them so your tank won't
        get over crowded.

        But the other important question is how long has this tank been set
        up? If it is a newer tank, say less than a month with fish in it, you
        do NOT want to add anything else until the tank cycles (ammonia and
        nitrite levels will spike then drop). Your local pet store will
        likely provide free water testing to see when your tank is back to
        safe levels again and you can add more fish.

        Patrick Timlin
        http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
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