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Problems with small white worms in tank set up

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  • boydthird
    I just broke down my 35 gallon hexagon tank and cleaned everything throughly. I had some plants leftover and put them back in the tank. I have let the water
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 22, 2005
      I just broke down my 35 gallon hexagon tank and cleaned everything
      throughly. I had some plants leftover and put them back in the tank. I
      have let the water filter for a couple of weeks and had hoped to put
      some new fish in it soon. Unfortunately I have noticed some small white
      wormy looking things floating throughout the tank. I have no idea what
      they are, or how they could have been introduced. Any idea what this
      could be? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks, Byron
    • Patrick A. Timlin
      Usually tiny white worms are planeria. Do a web search, plenty of info out there. For the most part, harmless and usually just a sign of less feeding to the
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 22, 2005
        Usually tiny white worms are planeria. Do a web search, plenty of
        info out there. For the most part, harmless and usually just a sign
        of less feeding to the tank and/or being a little better at cleaning
        the tank.

        Patrick

        --- boydthird <boydthird@...> wrote:

        > I just broke down my 35 gallon hexagon tank and cleaned everything
        > throughly. I had some plants leftover and put them back in the
        > tank. I
        > have let the water filter for a couple of weeks and had hoped to
        > put
        > some new fish in it soon. Unfortunately I have noticed some small
        > white
        > wormy looking things floating throughout the tank. I have no idea
        > what
        > they are, or how they could have been introduced. Any idea what
        > this
        > could be? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks, Byron
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Carla Romere
        I am giving my daughter a 1-gallon betta tank for Christmas. It came with an undergravel filter, which I ve never set up before. My 29-gallon has a bio-wheel
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 30, 2005
          I am giving my daughter a 1-gallon betta tank for Christmas. It came with an undergravel filter, which I've never set up before. My 29-gallon has a bio-wheel filter. I want to give it to her with a betta & maybe a couple other tiny little fish already in it. How much cycling does a one-gallon aquarium need before putting 2-3 fish in it? What small fish would do well with a betta in an unheated tank? Any other words of advice?

          Carla


          "We all get heavier as we get older because, there's a lot more information in our heads. So I'm not fat, I'm just really intelligent and my head couldn't hold any more so it started filling up the rest of me!"
          ~ Author Unknown







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Patrick A. Timlin
          ... Generally bettas do not like a lot of surface movement, so sometimes these small tanks with undergravel filters cause too much surface turbulence. What
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 30, 2005
            --- Carla Romere <hers2keep@...> wrote:
            > I am giving my daughter a 1-gallon betta tank for Christmas. It
            > came with an undergravel filter, which I've never set up before.

            Generally bettas do not like a lot of surface movement, so sometimes
            these small tanks with undergravel filters cause too much surface
            turbulence. What kind of tank is it? I have some small triangular
            one-gallon tanks I sometimes use with bettas. They too came with
            undergravel filters and I have run them both with and without the
            filter setup. But these particular tanks have a lip around part of
            the lid that creates an area where the bubbles come up, but isolates
            that movement from the rest of the surface. In other words, the
            bubbles do not disturb the entire surface so works well with a betta.

            Also keep in mind that airpumps are kind of noisy and if this tank is
            to be run in a bedroom, you might find the cheapo airpumps that often
            come with these setups to be a bit on the loud side (relatively
            speaking). You could upgrade to a better quality air pump, which
            would be quieter, or you might try muffling the pump (sit it on top
            of a soft surface, enclose it in a foam lines box with enough
            ventilation to allow air in, etc.). If you find the pump too loud,
            you can always set up the tank without the pump when keeping a betta.
            With frequent small partial water changes, you don't really need the
            filtering system. It is very easy to simply dip an 8-ounce cup into
            the tank removing 6.25% of the water. This water can be used to water
            house plants or poured into the sink, then replace the water in the
            tank. Because it is a single cup, you could do this easily anytime in
            about 30 seconds, so there is no reason why you couldn't do this
            twice a week. Or dip twice once a week for a 12+% water change. So a
            filterless system is easy on a tank this size since water changes are
            super easy.


            > My 29-gallon has a bio-wheel filter. I want to give it to her with
            a
            > betta & maybe a couple other tiny little fish already in it.

            Problem with a one gallon tank is they are tiny and will not hold
            many fish. Bettas are a bit large and one would do fine in this tank,
            but you probably don't want to add any additional fish, although
            snails might be an option. If you want multiple fish, then I suggest
            you skip the betta and instead go with a small species. White Cloud
            Mountain minnows are ideal for this sort of setup and you could put
            in a small trio of these charming little fish. Plus they do better
            than a betta in an unheated tank, especially if you keep the house
            cool.


            > How much cycling does a one-gallon aquarium
            > need before putting 2-3 fish in it?

            Since you already have a 29-gallon tank, you can probably seed the
            one gallon tank by using gravel and water from the 29-gal tank. Just
            be sure to get the fish in the next day or so, so the "seeded"
            bacteria do not die off from lack of a food source (fish produced
            ammonia).


            Patrick Timlin
            http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
          • Carla Romere
            Question/comments in red... Patrick A. Timlin wrote: --- Carla Romere wrote: We are giving my daughter a
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 30, 2005
              Question/comments in red...

              "Patrick A. Timlin" <ptimlin@...> wrote: --- Carla Romere <hers2keep@...> wrote:
              We are giving my daughter a 1-gallon betta tank for Christmas. It came with an undergravel filter, which I've never set up before.

              Generally bettas do not like a lot of surface movement, so sometimes these small tanks with undergravel filters cause too much surface turbulence. What kind of tank is it?

              It is one of the Jr. tanks available at Wal-Mart that come in the bright colors. It's sort of a mini-bow front I think.

              I have some small triangular one-gallon tanks I sometimes use with bettas. They too came with undergravel filters and I have run them both with and without the filter setup. But these particular tanks have a lip around part of the lid that creates an area where the bubbles come up, but isolates that movement from the rest of the surface. In other words, the
              bubbles do not disturb the entire surface so works well with a betta.
              So would you recommend setting it up without the underground filter then?

              Also keep in mind that airpumps are kind of noisy and if this tank is to be run in a bedroom, you might find the cheapo airpumps that often come with these setups to be a bit on the loud side (relatively speaking). You could upgrade to a better quality air pump, which would be quieter, or you might try muffling the pump (sit it on top of a soft surface, enclose it in a foam lines box with enough ventilation to allow air in, etc.). If you find the pump too loud, you can always set up the tank without the pump when keeping a betta. With frequent small partial water changes, you don't really need the filtering system. It is very easy to simply dip an 8-ounce cup into the tank removing 6.25% of the water. This water can be used to water house plants or poured into the sink, then replace the water in the
              tank. Because it is a single cup, you could do this easily anytime in about 30 seconds, so there is no reason why you couldn't do this twice a week. Or dip twice once a week for a 12+% water change. So a
              filterless system is easy on a tank this size since water changes are super easy.

              I haven't even unpacked it to look at the sort of air filter that came with it. So if the air pump is too loud, we can try some of your suggestions to quiet it down some.

              My 29-gallon has a bio-wheel filter. I want to give it to her with a betta & maybe a couple other tiny little fish already in it.

              Problem with a one gallon tank is they are tiny and will not hold many fish. Bettas are a bit large and one would do fine in this tank, but you probably don't want to add any additional fish, although snails might be an option. We have a snail population explosion going on in the 29-gallon right now. We've got 3 zebra loaches, but they just aren't keeping up! As prolific as they are in the 29-gallon, I'd hate to put some in the betta tank.

              If you want multiple fish, then I suggest you skip the betta and instead go with a small species. White Cloud Mountain minnows are ideal for this sort of setup and you could put in a small trio of these charming little fish. Plus they do better than a betta in an unheated tank, especially if you keep the house cool.

              We do keep the house about 70 degrees. She only actually asked for a betta, so maybe rather than get some other small fish also, I'll just look for a really pretty betta. Would it be a good idea to buy a small heater for this tank?

              How much cycling does a one-gallon aquarium need before putting 2-3 fish in it?

              Since you already have a 29-gallon tank, you can probably seed the one gallon tank by using gravel and water from the 29-gal tank. Just be sure to get the fish in the next day or so, so the "seeded" bacteria do not die off from lack of a food source (fish produced
              ammonia).

              Patrick Timlin
              http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/

              So, could we get the betta on Christmas Eve - acclimate him in the 29-gallon, then after my daughter goes to bed, move the betta with some gravel & a gallon of water from the 29-gallon, or does it need more prior set up than that?

              Thanks,
              Carla



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Patrick A. Timlin
              ... Carla, posts from this group come to me as plain text. Others might have the same issue, so in the future it is best to use the old plain text method
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 1, 2005
                --- Carla Romere <hers2keep@...> wrote:
                > Question/comments in red...

                Carla, posts from this group come to me as plain text. Others might
                have the same issue, so in the future it is best to use the old ">"
                plain text method of quoting rather than a graphical method that not
                all mail programs, readers, email servers, etc. can support.


                PT>> What kind of tank is it?

                > It is one of the Jr. tanks available at Wal-Mart that come in the
                > bright colors. It's sort of a mini-bow front I think.

                OK so more side to side than tall I guess? Which is good. In other
                words, in the one gallon volume more or less a square or rectangle
                that is wider than tall, vs. skinny and tall like a glass of water.


                > So would you recommend setting it up without
                > the underground filter then?

                Well since you have decided to go with the betta only, you can go
                either way. The two main things to help you decide is how much water
                movement does it create and how loud is the pump. If the betta seems
                happy in their with the water movement and isn't being blown around
                (e.g. the little guy is easily able to sit in one spot without having
                to fight to stay still) then the filtering is fine. However, as I
                said, you might find the air pump to be annoying. For example on the
                one I have on a small one-gallon tank, I have it set up in the
                kitchen area where the extra noise is fine, but I would never place
                that same pump/tank in my bedroom.

                Keep the amount of gravel on the filter plate light and if you find
                the pump is too loud, you can always remove it and leave the tank
                unfiltered without having to remove the plate.


                > I haven't even unpacked it to look at the sort of air filter that
                > came with it. So if the air pump is too loud, we can try some of
                > your suggestions to quiet it down some.

                Ya the one in my kitchen I have the pump sitting on top of an old
                folded up washcloth so it doesn't vibrate on the hard counter top.
                Plus I have a decent quality pump, not the super loud cheap-o pump
                that originally came with the setup.


                > We do keep the house about 70 degrees. She only actually asked for
                > a betta, so maybe rather than get some other small fish also, I'll
                > just look for a really pretty betta. Would it be a good idea to buy
                > a small heater for this tank?

                At 70, you are probably fine. Bettas do like it warm, but will do ok
                at 70. You might want to skip the heater for now, especially if for a
                small child who might be mucking around in and around the tank.


                > So, could we get the betta on Christmas Eve - acclimate him in
                > the 29-gallon, then after my daughter goes to bed, move the betta
                > with some gravel & a gallon of water from the 29-gallon, or does it
                > need more prior set up than that?

                That should be fine. If you were using new water, the I would suggest
                the tank be setup 24 hours in advance to allow the water to adjust to
                the proper temperature and to allow dissolved gasses to come out of
                the water. Water out of the tap is delivered under pressure, so
                gasses get dissolved into the water. Once the water gets into a tank
                at atmospheric pressure, those gases come out of solution (hence the
                MANY tiny bubbles you see later all over the tank) which can also
                cause swings in pH (dissolved CO2 lowers the pH, then comes out
                causing pH to bounce back up). These things you don't want happening
                with the fish in the tank.

                But since you would be taking the water from the 29 gallon initially,
                as well as some gravel, you can just setup the tank, fill it, move
                the betta and you are done. Instant present!


                Patrick Timlin
                http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
              • Carla Romere
                Thanks, Patrick!!! Carla ... Carla, posts from this group come to me as plain text. Others might have the same issue, so in the future it is best to use the
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 1, 2005
                  Thanks, Patrick!!!

                  Carla

                  "Patrick A. Timlin" <ptimlin@...> wrote:
                  --- Carla Romere <hers2keep@...> wrote:
                  > Question/comments in red...

                  Carla, posts from this group come to me as plain text. Others might
                  have the same issue, so in the future it is best to use the old ">"
                  plain text method of quoting rather than a graphical method that not
                  all mail programs, readers, email servers, etc. can support.


                  PT>> What kind of tank is it?

                  > It is one of the Jr. tanks available at Wal-Mart that come in the
                  > bright colors. It's sort of a mini-bow front I think.

                  OK so more side to side than tall I guess? Which is good. In other
                  words, in the one gallon volume more or less a square or rectangle
                  that is wider than tall, vs. skinny and tall like a glass of water.


                  > So would you recommend setting it up without
                  > the underground filter then?

                  Well since you have decided to go with the betta only, you can go
                  either way. The two main things to help you decide is how much water
                  movement does it create and how loud is the pump. If the betta seems
                  happy in their with the water movement and isn't being blown around
                  (e.g. the little guy is easily able to sit in one spot without having
                  to fight to stay still) then the filtering is fine. However, as I
                  said, you might find the air pump to be annoying. For example on the
                  one I have on a small one-gallon tank, I have it set up in the
                  kitchen area where the extra noise is fine, but I would never place
                  that same pump/tank in my bedroom.

                  Keep the amount of gravel on the filter plate light and if you find
                  the pump is too loud, you can always remove it and leave the tank
                  unfiltered without having to remove the plate.


                  > I haven't even unpacked it to look at the sort of air filter that
                  > came with it. So if the air pump is too loud, we can try some of
                  > your suggestions to quiet it down some.

                  Ya the one in my kitchen I have the pump sitting on top of an old
                  folded up washcloth so it doesn't vibrate on the hard counter top.
                  Plus I have a decent quality pump, not the super loud cheap-o pump
                  that originally came with the setup.


                  > We do keep the house about 70 degrees. She only actually asked for
                  > a betta, so maybe rather than get some other small fish also, I'll
                  > just look for a really pretty betta. Would it be a good idea to buy
                  > a small heater for this tank?

                  At 70, you are probably fine. Bettas do like it warm, but will do ok
                  at 70. You might want to skip the heater for now, especially if for a
                  small child who might be mucking around in and around the tank.


                  > So, could we get the betta on Christmas Eve - acclimate him in
                  > the 29-gallon, then after my daughter goes to bed, move the betta
                  > with some gravel & a gallon of water from the 29-gallon, or does it
                  > need more prior set up than that?

                  That should be fine. If you were using new water, the I would suggest
                  the tank be setup 24 hours in advance to allow the water to adjust to
                  the proper temperature and to allow dissolved gasses to come out of
                  the water. Water out of the tap is delivered under pressure, so
                  gasses get dissolved into the water. Once the water gets into a tank
                  at atmospheric pressure, those gases come out of solution (hence the
                  MANY tiny bubbles you see later all over the tank) which can also
                  cause swings in pH (dissolved CO2 lowers the pH, then comes out
                  causing pH to bounce back up). These things you don't want happening
                  with the fish in the tank.

                  But since you would be taking the water from the 29 gallon initially,
                  as well as some gravel, you can just setup the tank, fill it, move
                  the betta and you are done. Instant present!


                  Patrick Timlin
                  http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/


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                  ---------------------------------






                  "We all get heavier as we get older because, there's a lot more information in our heads. So I'm not fat, I'm just really intelligent and my head couldn't hold any more so it started filling up the rest of me!"
                  ~ Author Unknown







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Pinaki Bhattacharyya
                  ... came with an undergravel filter, which I ve never set up before. My 29-gallon has a bio-wheel filter. I want to give it to her with a betta & maybe a
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 2, 2005
                    --- In freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com, Carla Romere
                    <hers2keep@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am giving my daughter a 1-gallon betta tank for Christmas. It
                    came with an undergravel filter, which I've never set up before. My
                    29-gallon has a bio-wheel filter. I want to give it to her with a
                    betta & maybe a couple other tiny little fish already in it. How
                    much cycling does a one-gallon aquarium need before putting 2-3 fish
                    in it? What small fish would do well with a betta in an unheated
                    tank? Any other words of advice?
                    >
                    > Carla
                    >
                    >

                    Fitting a undergravel filter isnt very hard task. First u
                    have 2 buy a undergravel filter wich fits on your tanks ground
                    surface. then u have to fit all the parts as described on the
                    filters manual. then u have 2 put it on the ground on the aquarium.
                    and gentely fill the ground with stone. remember the candel portion
                    of the filter stans on the bacword side of the aquarioum. now fill
                    the aquarioum with water slowly. never try 2 fit the filter when the
                    tank is full or the fishes in the tank. it may harmful 4 ur fish(s).
                    Try it and if u face any prob just send a mail. Gud Luk
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