Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Freshwater Aquariums] Help!!!

Expand Messages
  • Patrick A. Timlin
    ... Can you give us more information? How bit of a tank is it? How long has it been set up? How many and what kind of fish do you have? Have you done any water
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 18, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- finkle23_1976 <finkle23_1976@...> wrote:
      > Hi, I am new to the list/group and need some serious help. All of
      > a sudden my water is super cloudy and all of my fish seem to be
      > dying. I'm not sure what is wrong. Can anyone give me some hints
      > to help save the fish I have left?

      Can you give us more information? How bit of a tank is it? How long
      has it been set up? How many and what kind of fish do you have? Have
      you done any water chemistry tests on the water yet? What is your
      maintenance schedule? Do you change water? How much and how often?


      =====
      Patrick Timlin
      http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
    • finkle23_1976
      ... Have ... I have a 55 gallon tank that I have had set up for 3 weeks. I just emptied about half of the water out and refilled it. I have right now 1 Angel
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 19, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > Can you give us more information? How bit of a tank is it? How long
        > has it been set up? How many and what kind of fish do you have?
        Have
        > you done any water chemistry tests on the water yet? What is your
        > maintenance schedule? Do you change water? How much and how often?
        >
        >
        > =====
        > Patrick Timlin
        > http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/

        I have a 55 gallon tank that I have had set up for 3 weeks. I just
        emptied about half of the water out and refilled it. I have right
        now 1 Angel fish, 1 laid back Beta, 1 Bala Shark, 1 bubble eyed
        goldfish? 1 comet and about 6 platys. I test my water daily using
        alittle test strip that I bought at walmart. I feed the fish twice a
        day once in the morning and once in late afternoon/early evening.
        The water seems to be kinda greenish something. I also have some
        live plants in there and two large bubble sticks. I think they are
        10 inches long. They fish that I have left seem to be okay. Any
        idea on what the best chems are for keeping the water at what it
        needs to be? I'll be going to walmart today and if I can get them
        there I will. Anything to save my fish. I had over 150.00 in fish
        and now over half are dead :(
        TIA
        Deb
      • Nimish Mathur
        Deb, Are you aware about a nitrogen cycle? A 3 week tank is still in the process of stability and doing 50% water change could have disrupted it. Cloudy water
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 19, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Deb,



          Are you aware about a nitrogen cycle? A 3 week tank is still in the process
          of stability and doing 50% water change could have disrupted it. Cloudy
          water is due to bacterial bloom which is a very good sign so do not try to
          keep it down. It takes approximately 2 months for the entire setup to
          properly stabilize so "DO NOT PANIC".



          Your collection of fish is very odd and should not have been sold to you.
          Angels can get very aggressive and certainly are in no way to be kept with
          any Betta. Goldfish and comet are cold water fish and have a totally
          different temperature requirement then the others you have.



          What test strip do you have from Walmart? What are the results of the test
          kit? You ideally need a Ammonia and a Nitrite (Not Nitrate) test kit but a
          Nitrate test kit will also be handy at later stages. As for now, just
          monitor the ammonia and nitrite and keep us updated on the readings and
          don't do any water changes for the moment. Adding some salt to the water may
          help. 1tsp per 5 gallons.



          Nim





          _____

          From: finkle23_1976 [mailto:finkle23_1976@...]
          Sent: 19 February 2005 12:38
          To: freshwateraquariums@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Freshwater Aquariums] Help!!!




          > Can you give us more information? How bit of a tank is it? How long
          > has it been set up? How many and what kind of fish do you have?
          Have
          > you done any water chemistry tests on the water yet? What is your
          > maintenance schedule? Do you change water? How much and how often?
          >
          >
          > =====
          > Patrick Timlin
          > http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/

          I have a 55 gallon tank that I have had set up for 3 weeks. I just
          emptied about half of the water out and refilled it. I have right
          now 1 Angel fish, 1 laid back Beta, 1 Bala Shark, 1 bubble eyed
          goldfish? 1 comet and about 6 platys. I test my water daily using
          alittle test strip that I bought at walmart. I feed the fish twice a
          day once in the morning and once in late afternoon/early evening.
          The water seems to be kinda greenish something. I also have some
          live plants in there and two large bubble sticks. I think they are
          10 inches long. They fish that I have left seem to be okay. Any
          idea on what the best chems are for keeping the water at what it
          needs to be? I'll be going to walmart today and if I can get them
          there I will. Anything to save my fish. I had over 150.00 in fish
          and now over half are dead :(
          TIA
          Deb








          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor



          <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129f72skh/M=324658.6070095.7083352.3001176/D=gr
          oups/S=1705417564:HM/EXP=1108904599/A=2343726/R=0/SIG=12imh2erh/*http:/clk.a
          tdmt.com/VON/go/yhxxxvon01900091von/direct/01/&time=1108818199413307>
          <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129f72skh/M=324658.6070095.7083352.3001176/D=gr
          oups/S=1705417564:HM/EXP=1108904599/A=2343726/R=1/SIG=12imh2erh/*http:/clk.a
          tdmt.com/VON/go/yhxxxvon01900091von/direct/01/&time=1108818199413307>

          Get unlimited calls to
          <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129f72skh/M=324658.6070095.7083352.3001176/D=gr
          oups/S=1705417564:HM/EXP=1108904599/A=2343726/R=1/SIG=12imh2erh/*http:/clk.a
          tdmt.com/VON/go/yhxxxvon01900091von/direct/01/&time=1108818199413307>

          U.S./Canada
          <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129f72skh/M=324658.6070095.7083352.3001176/D=gr
          oups/S=1705417564:HM/EXP=1108904599/A=2343726/R=1/SIG=12imh2erh/*http:/clk.a
          tdmt.com/VON/go/yhxxxvon01900091von/direct/01/&time=1108818199413307>


          <http://view.atdmt.com/VON/view/yhxxxvon01900091von/direct/01/&time=11088181
          99413307>



          <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=324658.6070095.7083352.3001176/D=groups/S=
          :HM/A=2343726/rand=674709387>



          _____

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          * To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/freshwateraquariums/

          * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          freshwateraquariums-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:freshwateraquariums-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>


          * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • raindropup@aol.com
          Deb, Fish loss in a new tank is not uncommon - particularly if you add a lot of fish during the first month which it sounds like you did. What other fish did
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 19, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Deb,

            Fish loss in a new tank is not uncommon - particularly if you add a lot of
            fish during the first month which it sounds like you did. What other fish did
            you add with the ones you have now? What happens is when you first fill a
            fishtank with water and fresh gravel and decor and a new filter, it takes a long
            time (up to six weeks) for the tank and filter to "mature" and be able to
            handle and break down the fish waste that is produced from the fish. A bacteria
            colony has to establish in your filter, in the gravel bed and on other surfaces
            in the tank to be able to break waste down. Until then, you may get abrupt
            shifts in water quality. This four to six week period is often called "New Tank
            Syndrome." You said that you've been testing your water; what results have
            you gotten? Have you been testing it all along?

            >The water seems to be kinda greenish something.

            Green water is caused by algae suspended in the water, commonly caused by an
            excess of nutrients in the tank and/or an excess of light. You said you have
            live plants in your tank - how many do you have? Usually if you have live
            plants in your tank they can "outcompete" the algae for light and nutrients but
            if you've only got one or two, the algae may take over. In order to fight the
            algae, make sure you're not overfeeding your fish (twice a day is usually
            okay, just make sure you're only feeding a small amount at each feeding. I
            usually go for a "dime-sized" pinch per feeding), and make sure the tank isn't
            getting hit by any direct sunlight from a window or that you're not leaving the
            tank light on all of the time. You may want to consider adding more live plants,
            too, if you only have a couple in there. There are algaecides on the market,
            but most of the time they will harm your live plants and are ineffective if
            you don't go to the source of why algae is blooming in the first place.

            >Any idea on what the best chems are for keeping the water at what it needs
            to be?

            YMMV on this one from fishkeeper to fishkeeper, but I make it a practice to
            avoid chemicals like pH adjusters and ammonia removers unless it's absolutely
            necessary. Depending on what your water test results have been, I would stick
            to a basic dechlorinator like Aquarium Pharmaceuticals' Stress Coat or Tetra's
            AquaSafe and perhaps a little bit of aquarium salt, but even that probably
            isn't necessary.

            To save the fish you've got left you may just want to let the New Tank
            Syndrome I described above run its course rather than try to monkey around with
            water quality too much. Unless you're getting high levels of either ammonia or
            nitrite in your water testing, you're probably good to just leave the tank alone
            to finish its cycling process and do a 25% water change once a week. I
            wouldn't recommend adding any more fish to the tank at the moment, either. Other
            than that, it'd be more stressful on the fish to try anything beyond that.

            Good luck!
            Lauren


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • raindropup
            Deb, Fish loss in a new tank is not uncommon - particularly if you add a lot of fish during the first month which it sounds like you did. What other fish did
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 19, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Deb,

              Fish loss in a new tank is not uncommon - particularly if you add a
              lot of fish during the first month which it sounds like you did.
              What other fish did you add with the ones you have now? What happens
              is when you first fill a fishtank with water and fresh gravel and
              decor and a new filter, it takes a long time (up to six weeks) for
              the tank and filter to "mature" and be able to handle and break down
              the fish waste that is produced from the fish. A bacteria colony has
              to establish in your filter, in the gravel bed and on other surfaces
              in the tank to be able to break waste down. Until then, you may get
              abrupt shifts in water quality. This four to six week period is
              often called "New Tank Syndrome." You said that you've been testing
              your water; what results have you gotten? Have you been testing it
              all along?

              >The water seems to be kinda greenish something.

              Green water is caused by algae suspended in the water, commonly
              caused by an excess of nutrients in the tank and/or an excess of
              light. You said you have live plants in your tank - how many do you
              have? Usually if you have live plants in your tank they
              can "outcompete" the algae for light and nutrients but if you've only
              got one or two, the algae may take over. In order to fight the
              algae, make sure you're not overfeeding your fish (twice a day is
              usually okay, just make sure you're only feeding a small amount at
              each feeding. I usually go for a "dime-sized" pinch per feeding),
              and make sure the tank isn't getting hit by any direct sunlight from
              a window or that you're not leaving the tank light on all of the
              time. You may want to consider adding more live plants, too, if you
              only have a couple in there. There are algaecides on the market, but
              most of the time they will harm your live plants and are ineffective
              if you don't go to the source of why algae is blooming in the first
              place.

              >Any idea on what the best chems are for keeping the water at what it
              needs to be?

              YMMV on this one from fishkeeper to fishkeeper, but I make it a
              practice to avoid chemicals like pH adjusters and ammonia removers
              unless it's absolutely necessary. Depending on what your water test
              results have been, I would stick to a basic dechlorinator like
              Aquarium Pharmaceuticals' Stress Coat or Tetra's AquaSafe and perhaps
              a little bit of aquarium salt, but even that probably isn't
              necessary.

              To save the fish you've got left you may just want to let the New
              Tank Syndrome I described above run its course rather than try to
              monkey around with water quality too much. Unless you're getting
              high levels of either ammonia or nitrite in your water testing,
              you're probably good to just leave the tank alone to finish its
              cycling process and do a 25% water change once a week. I wouldn't
              recommend adding any more fish to the tank at the moment, either.
              Other than that, it'd be more stressful on the fish to try anything
              beyond that.

              Good luck!
              Lauren
            • Patrick A. Timlin
              ... OK you have suffered from the classic mistake many new tank owners fall into, which is new tank syndrome or said another way, way too many fish in a new
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 19, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                --- finkle23_1976 <finkle23_1976@...> wrote:
                > I have a 55 gallon tank that I have had set up for 3 weeks.
                > Anything to save my fish. I had over 150.00 in fish
                > and now over half are dead :(

                OK you have suffered from the classic mistake many new tank owners
                fall into, which is new tank syndrome or said another way, way too
                many fish in a new tank without allowing the tank to cycle. Without
                going into the details (I will provide some links for you to read),
                what happened is too many fish produced too much ammonia which
                poisoned and killed the fish.

                For more details on the cycle, start reading here...
                http://faq.thekrib.com/
                paying close attention to the "Your First Aquarium" section.

                And also read Patrick's page specifically on the "cycle" found at...
                http://americanfishguy.tripod.com/nitrogencycle.html

                Actually I have never read his page, so after I finish this email, I
                will give it the old once over myself.

                [Hey Patrick! Took me a while to find the link. Why not throw it in
                the links section of this group's Yahoo home page, eh?]


                > I test my water daily using alittle test strip that I bought at
                walmart.

                Did your tests ever show an elevated level of ammonia? They should
                have. If not, then something might be up with those strips not
                working right.


                > I just emptied about half of the water out and refilled it.

                OK good start. You also now want to avoid adding any more fish to the
                tank until the nitrogen cycle is complete. If your strips are not
                showing levels of ammonia and nitrites, then you probably want to
                take a cup's worth of your tank water to your local pet store and get
                it tested. Everyone I have ever visited, including the large pet
                superstores, provide free water testing (although Walmart's pet
                department may be an exception to that). Then you can see if your
                test strips are showing the same parameters as the store's testing.

                As long as you/the store measure any level of ammonia and/or
                nitrites, you do not want to add new fish. You want to wait until
                those levels go to zero. And even then, when adding new fish, you can
                to do it gradually. Add a small school or a couple individuals, then
                wait for the tank to readjust (give it at least a week). Then add
                more if you want. But do not go and buy a full tank's worth of fish
                in one shot or you risk running into the same problems again.

                By the way, did you buy the tank and fish all at the same time? If
                so, what store was it that sold you a brand new tank and $150 worth
                of fish without so much as a warning that you would likely lose most
                of your fish in the first few weeks?


                > I have right now 1 Angel fish, 1 laid back Beta, 1 Bala Shark, 1
                bubble eyed
                > goldfish? 1 comet and about 6 platys.

                OK still a lot of fish for a new tank, but if you watch your
                ammonia/nitrite levels and do partial water changes as needed to keep
                the levels at non-lethal readings, you should be ok.

                Oh, that reminds me. Are you treating the water for chlorine or
                chloramines? If you are on a private well, this won't apply, but if
                you are on public water, you may have chlorine or chloramine in the
                water which needs to be neutralized before adding it to the tank.

                Bala sharks have two related problems. The first is the get very big
                and often outgrow most tanks. Even your 55g will eventually be too
                small for it. Second, they are schooling fish and do best in groups,
                which makes the too big for most tanks even worse. So you might
                consider trying to return it to the fish store if you don't want to
                deal with that issue down the road. Most, when kept as single
                individuals, tend to be very shy and skitterish, so expect it to hide
                much of the time and spook easily slamming itself into the tank walls
                as it gets larger.

                Also there is some debate about keeping goldfish/comets with
                tropicals. I won't go into that, but you may find people suggesting
                that this is not a great combination for various reasons (some valid,
                some not so valid).


                > I feed the fish twice a day once in the morning and once in late
                > afternoon/early evening.
                > The water seems to be kinda greenish something.

                Green water is not very uncommon on recently set up tanks, as is the
                greyish cloudy water. And by recently I mean anything in the last 4-6
                months. I have seen many tanks, even after running fine for three
                months or more suddenly go grey cloudy or green pea soup. But it
                typically clears up on its own after a bit and often trying to "fix"
                it doesn't work. Patience is the key for that.

                Anyway, back to your main problem, to recap, test the water, do water
                changes as needed to keep levels in check, do not add any more fish
                until the nitrogen cycle is complete, then when you add new fish, do
                it slowly over a couple months.

                =====
                Patrick Timlin
                http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
              • finkle23_1976
                Hey, I don t know what happened or what I did, but my water is crystal clear again. I think it was some of my plants that were dying and they are gone now.
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 24, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hey, I don't know what happened or what I did, but my water is
                  crystal clear again. I think it was some of my plants that were
                  dying and they are gone now. But the fish seem to be fine and happy
                  as all get out. Thanks for all the help. Hmmmm I wonder if one of
                  ya waved a magic water clearing wand to help me out :) I also found
                  a few snails in the tank, don't know how they got there, but they
                  are. They will help keep the tank clean too right? I have a few
                  broad leafed plants in the tank and one of them has started to
                  shred? I'm not sure what caused this although I have been told that
                  the fish will eat them if they are hungry. Also can anyone tell me
                  how long before algae will start to grow? I am wanting to add a
                  sucker fish (can't spell the tech. name for them) my little boy
                  loves them, but right now there doesn't seem to be anything for
                  him/her to eat.
                  TIA
                  Deb in Mississippi
                • Deenerz@aol.com
                  Also can anyone tell me how long before algae will start to grow? I am wanting to add a sucker fish (can t spell the tech. name for them) my little boy
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 24, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    "" Also can anyone tell me
                    how long before algae will start to grow? I am wanting to add a
                    sucker fish (can't spell the tech. name for them) my little boy
                    loves them, but right now there doesn't seem to be anything for
                    him/her to eat.
                    TIA
                    Deb in Mississippi""

                    Hi Deb,
                    You probably mean a plecostomus, although I may be wrong, there are other fish that "suck" and eat algae.
                    As far as feeding them algae that is not nearly enough to feed them. You need to feed them some veggies or algae wafers. I give them real vegetables as they are cheaper than the dried wafers. Depending on their size they can devour a zuchini. If it is a baby plecostomus get one of the smaller zuchini's or cut one up ad keep the rest in the fridge. Also wash the veggies off first. You don't want any pesticides to get in with the fish.

                    Mike
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.