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Re: [Freshwater Aquariums] Snails

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  • Patrick A. Timlin
    ... Hi Andy, It isn t likely they are the same snails. Usually the large Apple or Mystery snails you see sold in pet stores are not native to the USA and
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 31, 2004
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      --- moe <mo2702@...> wrote:
      > I have a question. Are the snail in the Mississippi River. The
      > same snails,you buy in a store. Well I have any problems. If i
      > put them in my tank.

      Hi Andy,

      It isn't likely they are the same snails. Usually the large "Apple"
      or "Mystery" snails you see sold in pet stores are not native to the
      USA and are farm raised in Florida or possibly the far east.

      However there are some large snails native to the US that do look a
      lot like Apple/Mystery snails and I have seen some for sale in local
      shops before. There are a species of large ones in a river near my
      house (Massachusetts) that I tend to collect from time to time and
      keep in my tanks. They are a bit drab in color, being just brown, but
      they do have rather nice gold specs on their bodies (the soft part)
      if you take the time to look. They are also live bearing snails. I
      have not had any problem keeping them in my tanks with tropical fish
      although I suspect they may not live as long due to the warmer
      temperature of my tanks vs. the river they come out of. I also use
      them in a outdoor half whiskey barrel type tub I keep on my back
      porch during the warmer months and grow a little water garden out
      there. I usually throw a half dozen or so in there at the beginning
      of the season along with a small handful of white cloud mountain
      minnows. But the fall when it is time to take it down and bring all
      the fish and snails inside, I tend to have several dozen fish (from
      the initial 3-6 I started with) and usually the original snails plus
      a dozen or more smaller new ones.

      One word of warning. If you do add local snails, plants, fish, etc.
      to your home tanks, NEVER release any of them back into the wild.
      Once you mix these with tropicals or other foreign and exotic
      animals, if you try to put the snails back in the wild, you might be
      introducing foreign disease, fungus, parasites, or other problems
      into the wild picked up from your tropical plants and animals. As
      fish keepers, we have to be responsible!


      =====
      Patrick Timlin
      http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/
    • Paula Brown
      Freshwater AquariumsAll of my tanks are heavily planted so I always have a problem with snails (even though I soak and soak new plants before bringing them
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 27, 2008
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        Freshwater AquariumsAll of my tanks are heavily planted so I always have a problem with snails (even though I soak and soak new plants before bringing them in). The normal loaches that love to eat snails should be kept in schools and I just don't have the room considering how big they get. I am not a big fan of botia's.

        What I do is get some zucchini, cut it into strips, and pop it in the freezer. About once or twice a week, I put a strip or two into the tanks at night. Some of the fish will eat it (especially my pleco) but what is left will be covered with snails in the morning. I then scoop it out with a pair of tongs in the morning and dispose of it along with all the snails. That normally helps keep down the population.

        Normally if snails are thriving in a tank, your water is dirty (normally you are overfeeding).

        Paula in Monroe, Michigan


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      • Patrick A. Timlin
        To nit pick your statement, the over feeding part is correct but having snails thriving in your tank is not an indication of dirty water. You can have
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 29, 2008
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          To nit pick your statement, the over feeding part is correct but having snails thriving in your tank is not an indication of dirty water. You can have outstanding water conditions and a thriving snail population.

          Patrick Timlin
          http://www.geocities.com/ptimlin/

          --- On Fri, 6/27/08, Paula Brown <paulabrown4480@...> wrote:
          > Normally if snails are thriving in a tank, your water is dirty
          > (normally you are overfeeding) .
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