Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

subonne = ?

Expand Messages
  • hagenpam@hotmail.com
    I am translating a newspaper article and have come across a word that I believe could be a misprint. Could someone verify the meaning of the word in the
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      I am translating a newspaper article and have come across a word that
      I believe could be a misprint. Could someone verify the meaning of
      the word in the following sentence [which I have copied exactly as it
      appears, punctuation and all]?

      Sur le conseil du pilote, son subonne', Jean, accepte que leur petit
      avion aille se poser 'a Marseille.

      Also, would "quinze mois ferme" mean 15 months, no parole? I
      understand ferme= firm or no suspension. Would "without parole" be
      the equivalent in US terms?

      Thank you so much!
      Pam
    • Charlotte Denis
      My guess, Pam, is that you have a typo in your original document. subonne could in fact be subordonne ...meaning the co-pilot... As for quinze mois
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        My guess, Pam, is that you have a typo in your original document. "subonne'"
        could in fact be "subordonne'"...meaning the co-pilot...

        As for "quinze mois ferme", I'd agree with you; 15 months, without parole.


        Charlotte

        hagenpam@... wrote:

        > I am translating a newspaper article and have come across a word that
        > I believe could be a misprint. Could someone verify the meaning of
        > the word in the following sentence [which I have copied exactly as it
        > appears, punctuation and all]?
        >
        > Sur le conseil du pilote, son subonne', Jean, accepte que leur petit
        > avion aille se poser 'a Marseille.
        >
        > Also, would "quinze mois ferme" mean 15 months, no parole? I
        > understand ferme= firm or no suspension. Would "without parole" be
        > the equivalent in US terms?
        >
        > Thank you so much!
        > Pam
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Patrice Champarou
        Hello Pam ... Not exactly, because a parole means freeing someone who has been actually doing part of his time ( liberté conditionnelle ) French laws allow
        Message 3 of 3 , May 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello Pam

          On 01-May-01, you wrote:

          > Also, would "quinze mois ferme" mean 15 months, no parole?

          Not exactly, because a parole means freeing someone who has been
          actually doing part of his time ( liberté conditionnelle )

          French laws allow to pronounce a "suspended" sentence - the suspension (
          sursis ) means that even though a definite time is given ( one or several
          months ) it is not actually executed, unless the person gets a second
          sentence
          for the same kind of offense or crime.

          In other words, "quinze mois fermes" means "without any suspension" ( the
          adjective should clearly refer to the number of months, since it's also
          possible to get "fifteen months, including six, seven... with - or without
          - a suspension" )
          >
          > Sur le conseil du pilote, son subonne', Jean, accepte que leur petit
          > avion aille se poser 'a Marseille.

          The fisrt word one can think of is obvioulsy "subordonné", but according
          to the punctuation that would mean Jean was supposed to obey the pilot's
          orders, in which case it's hard to understand why he "accepted" them. See
          if it fits the context, maybe...

          And good luck with "typos" in French papers ;)))

          Patrice
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.