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French hopscotch???

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  • Chris Morgan
    A very warm welcome to anyone who remembers their childhood games, in either English or French. From a translation that touches on military period, I ve got a
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 7, 2002
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      A very warm welcome to anyone who remembers their childhood games, in either English or French.

      From a translation that touches on military period, I've got a satirical reference which relates war exercises to a game of hopscotch - la marelle. (They're marking out danger areas with chalk in their exercises.) But being English and male I never got to play much hopscotch. And it all seem like it's from a bygone era. I'm hoping someone, somewhere remembers the rules.

      Aux francophones, est-ce que la phrase ''Celui qui marche dedans a perdu'' appartient bien à la marelle ? Ou est-ce que ça vient d'ailleurs ?

      For the English speakers, I remember something about stepping on the cracks in the pavement, but what really is the penalty, colloquially speaking, for landing in the wrong place in hopscotch? Is there a stock phrase?

      Any help will be most bienvenue,

      Chris.
      London





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Alison Keroack
      Hello. I recall that each school had its own house rules as far as the penalty for stepping outside the squares. The version I used to play as a kid was just
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 8, 2002
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        Hello. I recall that each school had its own "house rules" as far as the
        penalty for stepping outside the squares. The version I used to play as a
        kid was just that you were "out" so you couldn't play anymore. The game
        continued until there was only one person left (or we got bored, whichever
        came first).

        Also, are you sure it's stepping on a crack? There was a separate
        superstition about "step on a crack, break your mother's back" but that
        didn't apply to hopscotch.

        Hope this helps.
        Alison K


        >From: "Chris Morgan" <christianmorgan@...>
        >Reply-To: french-translation@yahoogroups.com
        >To: <french-translation@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: [french-translation] French hopscotch???
        >Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2002 04:07:38 -0000
        >

        [snip]

        >For the English speakers, I remember something about stepping on the cracks
        >in the pavement, but what really is the penalty, colloquially speaking,
        >for landing in the wrong place in hopscotch? Is there a stock phrase?
        >
        >Any help will be most bienvenue,
        >
        >Chris.
        >London


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      • Chris Morgan
        Thanks for your help, Alison. You re right, of course, the stepping on a crack bit, doesn t belong to hopscotch: it was to do with paving stones, but it was
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 8, 2002
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          Thanks for your help, Alison.

          You're right, of course, the 'stepping on a crack' bit, doesn't belong to
          hopscotch: it was to do with paving stones, but it was the only thing I
          could remember!

          It was interesting that you said 'squares' without me prompting you. That's
          the only way I've ever seen it played whereas my source text uses circles.
          Perhaps there is another version played in France? There again, the author
          might be trying to get an endorsement on his artistic licence.

          But something like 'step inside and you're out' might just get me through.
          (Or any other, more playground-like suggestions...? Or indeed more warlike
          solutions, given that the idea is to link children's games with war games.)

          >(or we got bored, whichever
          > came first).

          Yep, I tried it once, thought it was easy, and in dismissing it like that, I
          completely missed the whole point of the exercise....


          With both feet firmly on the ground,
          thanks again,

          Chris
          London.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Alison Keroack" <akeroack@...>
          To: <french-translation@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, December 09, 2002 1:46 AM
          Subject: Re: [french-translation] French hopscotch???


          >
          > Hello. I recall that each school had its own "house rules" as far as the
          > penalty for stepping outside the squares. The version I used to play as a
          > kid was just that you were "out" so you couldn't play anymore. The game
          > continued until there was only one person left (or we got bored, whichever
          > came first).
          >
          > Also, are you sure it's stepping on a crack? There was a separate
          > superstition about "step on a crack, break your mother's back" but that
          > didn't apply to hopscotch.
          >
          > Hope this helps.
          > Alison K
        • Reid Translation
          Dear Chris, Please find attached two website that explain what the jeu de la marelle is. http://www.febe-febestral.be/jeu_de_marelle.htm
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 9, 2002
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            Dear Chris,

            Please find attached two website that explain what the jeu de la marelle is.

            http://www.febe-febestral.be/jeu_de_marelle.htm
            http://maf.mcq.org/jeux/jouets/vignettes/fr/jd_mcq_marelle_153.php



            The third website talks about another type of marelle which does have circles. Maybe that one is the one the author had in mind.



            http://www.recreomath.qc.ca/dict_simple_marelle.htm



            Have a wonderful day.

            Best regards,



            Aline


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lorraine Calzetta
            Merci pour l information. Il est tres interessant. Je suis Americaine mais ma mere a nee en France. Mon pere a ete un professeur du Mathematics.Peut etre,
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 9, 2002
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              Merci pour l'information. Il est tres interessant.

              Je suis Americaine mais ma mere a nee en France. Mon pere a ete un professeur
              du Mathematics.Peut etre, c'est la raison que le jeu de mareele a ete tres
              populaire dans ma famille. merci, encore!

              Lorraine-Cecile Benoit

              On Mon, 9 Dec 2002 07:28:05 -0800 (PST) Reid Translation
              <reidtranslation@...> wrote:

              > Dear Chris,
              >
              > Please find attached two website that explain
              > what the jeu de la marelle is.
              >
              > <a
              >
              href="http://www.febe-febestral.be/jeu_de_marelle.htm">http://www.febe-febestral.be/jeu_de_marelle.htm</a>
              > <a
              >
              href="http://maf.mcq.org/jeux/jouets/vignettes/fr/jd_mcq_marelle_153.php">http://maf.mcq.org/jeux/jouets/vignettes/fr/jd_mcq_marelle_153.php</a>
              >
              >
              >
              > The third website talks about another type of
              > marelle which does have circles.� Maybe
              > that one is the one the author had in mind.
              >
              >
              >
              > <a
              >
              href="http://www.recreomath.qc.ca/dict_simple_marelle.htm">http://www.recreomath.qc.ca/dict_simple_marelle.htm</a>
              >
              >
              >
              > Have a wonderful day.
              >
              > Best regards,
              >
              >
              >
              > Aline
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the <a
              > href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/">Yahoo!
              > Terms of Service</a>.



              Lorraine Calzetta

              .....Que Hiver, que demain.
            • Chris Morgan
              Dear Aline, Thanks for the very helpful links. Keep up the good work! Chris
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 9, 2002
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                Dear Aline,

                Thanks for the very helpful links.

                Keep up the good work!

                Chris
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