Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The West, Isolation & Know Thyself!!!!!!!!!

Expand Messages
  • B Irvin
    ... I failed to mention that although my closest neighbor to the south lived in WY and 57 miles away, my closest neighbor to the north was only 1.5 miles. The
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Tim and friends observed:

      > > I understand that. Which makes your own water source even more
      > important. The point is, in Crow County, how deep must I drill a well?
      > Any idea of costs? I am being PERFECTLY serious here. several years ago i
      > checked on the cost to drill a well in Arizona and it was astronomical
      > (in the $10,000-20,000 plus range).
      >
      > > And you're correct. The huge distance between "settlements" is one thing
      > > that, to me, is spooky about the west. I'm not a city gal, I like my
      > > isolation...but to me that means neighbors within 5 miles. Debra Ricketts

      >Interesting. And viva la difference. I *don't* like isolation, and
      >can't figure out people who want to live out in the middle of nowhere with
      >the closest neighbor 50 miles away. No matter where the Free State sets up
      >shop, I intend to live in a town or city with plenty of friends and
      >neighbors around. Some people are gregarious. I'm one of 'em. That's where
      >cities come from. Still & all, whatever stirs your grits is okay with moi!


      I failed to mention that although my closest neighbor to the south lived
      in WY and 57 miles away, my closest neighbor to the north was only
      1.5 miles. The community of Pryor (pop. 300) was six miles and Billings
      (pop. 110,000) was 42 mikes. I am unable to continue an active
      communication (physical, e-mail, snail mail, or telephone) with over
      300 people a day; thus, I seldom needed to travel to Billings.

      One of the advantages of my isolation at that time was that over
      a two year period I shot one elk, two Mule deer, and fourteen
      Sage Grouse from my kitchen window. Within 40 feet of my
      back door I caught my weight in Cutthroat Trout just about every
      month. Try doing that in Newark!

      I wonder how many in our group have ever been in situation
      where you were over ten miles away from any human? I you
      have never been in total isolation, how, to paraphrase Socrates,
      do you know thyself? I raised all my children to know that by
      far the most dangerous creature in a Montana wilderness is
      not grizzlies, mountain lions, moose, or lynx; but, it is man.

      Ben













      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tim Condon
      ... I like small cities. Whenever you go to a movie or theatre production, you re communicating with people. Whenever you walk down a street and nod or say
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 2, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        At 05:18 PM 8/1/02 -0600, you wrote:
        >Tim and friends observed: And you're correct. The huge distance between
        >"settlements" is one thing that, to me, is spooky about the west. I'm not
        >a city gal, I like my isolation...but to me that means neighbors within 5
        >miles. Debra Ricketts
        >
        > >Interesting. And viva la difference. I *don't* like isolation, and
        > >can't figure out people who want to live out in the middle of nowhere with
        > >the closest neighbor 50 miles away. No matter where the Free State sets up
        > >shop, I intend to live in a town or city with plenty of friends and
        > >neighbors around. Some people are gregarious. I'm one of 'em. That's where
        > >cities come from. Still & all, whatever stirs your grits is okay with
        > moi! Tim Condon
        >
        >
        >I failed to mention that although my closest neighbor to the south lived
        >in WY and 57 miles away, my closest neighbor to the north was only
        >1.5 miles. The community of Pryor (pop. 300) was six miles and Billings
        >(pop. 110,000) was 42 mikes. I am unable to continue an active
        >communication (physical, e-mail, snail mail, or telephone) with over
        >300 people a day; thus, I seldom needed to travel to Billings.

        I like small cities. Whenever you go to a movie or theatre
        production, you're communicating with people. Whenever you walk down a
        street and nod or say hello to passers-by, you're communicating. Whenever
        you go to a rock concert with thousands of other people, you're
        communicating. When you go to a mall packed with holiday shoppers, you're
        communicating. When you join a club like Rotary or Kiwanis, or have a poker
        game, or an outdoor barbeque with your neighbors, or go shooting at the
        local range, or hit a bar and have a few drinks, or go to a dance...you're
        "communicating." Or maybe I should say "communing" with other human beings,
        most of whom have good hearts. I don't disturb those who want to live an
        isolated or hermit's life, but it's not for me, and I would guess it's not
        for most people, most of whom live in or adjacent to towns, cities, and
        suburbs.

        >I wonder how many in our group have ever been in situation where you were
        >over ten miles from another human.
        >Ben

        Probably only when I hitchhiked alone across northwest Africa,
        through Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. Possibly when I did the same thing
        across North America, particularly in the western plains and deserts. Tim Condon
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.