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Re: Electron drift effect in DC electromagnets?

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  • Tom
    Looks like a good start. Thanks for mentioning the term bucking coil since the exact words move far better through the search tools. Such a coil can be made
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 21 2:26 PM
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      Looks like a good start. Thanks for mentioning the term "bucking coil" since the exact words move far better through the search tools.

      Such a coil can be made two ways:
      1. Fields cancel and so does electron drift.
      2. Fields cancel but electron drift adds.



      --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, Warren Stutt <wstutt@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Tom,
      >
      > It sounds to me like you a describing a "bucking coil". Try a search on
      > that phrase.
      >
      > Warren.
      >
      > On 1/04/2013 9:38 AM, Tom wrote:
      > >
      > > I would like to know if anyone has done experiments with solenoids
      > > such as this:
      > > A single layer of wire is wound clockwise around a plastic form,
      > > starting at the bottom and winding turn after turn until the top of
      > > the plastic form is reached. "Clockwise" is viewed as you would see it
      > > when looking at the top of the plastic form. Let's say we can get 500
      > > turns on this layer.
      > >
      > > A second layer is then wound counterclockwise from the bottom, and
      > > winding turn after turn until the top of the plastic form is reached,
      > > exactly the same number of turns (500) as the first winding.
      > >
      > > Then the top wire of the first layer is connected to the bottom wire
      > > of the second layer, and DC current is made to flow in the coil,
      > > negative electric pole connected to the bottom wire of the first
      > > winding and the positive pole connected to the top wire of the second
      > > winding.
      > >
      > > Theoretically, the resultant magnetic field would self-cancel.
      > > However, in both cases electron motion in the windings is in the same
      > > direction, from the bottom of the plastic coil form to the top of the
      > > form. Even though a small wire carries lots of electrons from the top
      > > of the first winding to the bottom of the second winding, the vast
      > > bulk of electrons in motion in this coil are moving slowly from bottom
      > > to top.
      > >
      > > DC electromagnetic field theory seems not to care about this motion,
      > > if I am not mistaken. Is this correct?
      > >
      > > If DC electromagnetic field theory does not care about this motion,
      > > and it truly does not have any effect on the magnetic field, has
      > > anyone looked for any other effect of this motion?
      > >
      > > Thanks for your information and opinions.
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Tom
      George replied with this link: http://electropub.wordpress.com/2010/06/13/unique-coil-to-extract-energy-non-reciprocally/ This is an interesting piece,
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 24 3:56 PM
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        George replied with this link:
        http://electropub.wordpress.com/2010/06/13/unique-coil-to-extract-energy-non-reciprocally/

        This is an interesting piece, pointing out that the different diameter of coils will produce a differential inductance even though the number of turns on both coils is equal.

        Yet it is possible to completely cancel the inductance with a dual winding on a single layer, and I think there are other ways to do it as well. For example one could wind 4 layers such that the center of the windings is a point midway between the second and third layer, and the winding symmetry would be designed around this center such that the inductance cancels.

        This would leave the electron drift as a variable feature of the design, so that we would still be able to wind two versions of this coil.

        Coil 1: Inductance cancels but electron drift does not.
        Coil 2: Inductance cancels and electron drift cancels.

        It might be possible to wind the coil in sections so that a single device could be set up to have no electron drift, or to have electron drift (always with inductance cancelling). This might be accomplished by switching the way several layers are interconnected. Such a device would allow extremely precise measurements to be made because there would be no issues with device-to-device variation.

        So I still wonder if anyone has investigated this electron drift idea. Apparently no one has.

        --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <thomasjschum@...> wrote:
        >
        > Looks like a good start. Thanks for mentioning the term "bucking coil" since the exact words move far better through the search tools.
        >
        > Such a coil can be made two ways:
        > 1. Fields cancel and so does electron drift.
        > 2. Fields cancel but electron drift adds.
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, Warren Stutt <wstutt@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Tom,
        > >
        > > It sounds to me like you a describing a "bucking coil". Try a search on
        > > that phrase.
        > >
        > > Warren.
        > >
        > > On 1/04/2013 9:38 AM, Tom wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I would like to know if anyone has done experiments with solenoids
        > > > such as this:
        > > > A single layer of wire is wound clockwise around a plastic form,
        > > > starting at the bottom and winding turn after turn until the top of
        > > > the plastic form is reached. "Clockwise" is viewed as you would see it
        > > > when looking at the top of the plastic form. Let's say we can get 500
        > > > turns on this layer.
        > > >
        > > > A second layer is then wound counterclockwise from the bottom, and
        > > > winding turn after turn until the top of the plastic form is reached,
        > > > exactly the same number of turns (500) as the first winding.
        > > >
        > > > Then the top wire of the first layer is connected to the bottom wire
        > > > of the second layer, and DC current is made to flow in the coil,
        > > > negative electric pole connected to the bottom wire of the first
        > > > winding and the positive pole connected to the top wire of the second
        > > > winding.
        > > >
        > > > Theoretically, the resultant magnetic field would self-cancel.
        > > > However, in both cases electron motion in the windings is in the same
        > > > direction, from the bottom of the plastic coil form to the top of the
        > > > form. Even though a small wire carries lots of electrons from the top
        > > > of the first winding to the bottom of the second winding, the vast
        > > > bulk of electrons in motion in this coil are moving slowly from bottom
        > > > to top.
        > > >
        > > > DC electromagnetic field theory seems not to care about this motion,
        > > > if I am not mistaken. Is this correct?
        > > >
        > > > If DC electromagnetic field theory does not care about this motion,
        > > > and it truly does not have any effect on the magnetic field, has
        > > > anyone looked for any other effect of this motion?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks for your information and opinions.
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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