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Re: New form of DC current?

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  • ranger116@webtv.net
    What is the use of the new DC ?
    Message 1 of 34 , Jul 1, 2006
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      What is the use of the new DC ?
    • Tom Schum
      When you apply a potential across pure water, doesn t it take a small amount of time for the water molecules to swivel into alignment with the electric field?
      Message 34 of 34 , Jul 6, 2006
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        When you apply a potential across pure water, doesn't it take a small
        amount of time for the water molecules to swivel into alignment with
        the electric field?

        --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, "Gary S." <garys_2k@...> wrote:
        >
        > People have fiddled with the waveform sent to an electrlyzer over
        and
        > over again, looking for "resonance" and other ideas to change the
        > conversion energy. All have failed. While I'm not saying EVERY
        > possible waveshape has been tried, over all the frequencies, even
        > quantum mechanics suggests that there's nothing to be gained by
        > imposing an AC signal onto the electrolyzer.
        >
        > OBTW, there is no need to reverse the current direction to have
        real,
        > honest to God AC applied to the current. Varying the voltage
        > periodically, even if it never reverses, means that AC is being
        > applied. Add up the vectors.
        >
        > The only thing that I think is new with this latest gadget is using
        > the reversing current to shake the wire electrodes, thereby shedding
        > the bubbles more quickly. This could improve the electrolyzer's gas
        > output at the expense of increasing its power input.
        >
        > --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Schum" <thomasjschum@>
        wrote:
        > >
        > > The AC I am talking about is superimposed on the DC bias of the
        > > electrolyzer and never reverse-biases the electrolyzer. This is
        more
        > > in keeping with the "Sully DC" concept. If the amplitude is too
        high,
        > > the electrolyzer will go into AC operation, which would be bad.
        > >
        > > The high frequencies I referred to in the link are only the tip
        of the
        > > iceberg, probably far from the best frequencies for any useful
        system,
        > > maybe even dangerous.
        > >
        > > The patent seems to cover the application of high frequencies to
        > > electrolysis generally.
        > >
        > > Tom Schum
        > >
        > > --- In free_energy@yahoogroups.com, "Gary S." <garys_2k@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > But applying AC for electrolysis is usually not good, due to
        impedance
        > > > matching issues. There's more good stuff on electrolysis here:
        > > > http://www.tinaja.com/glib/energfun.pdf
        > > >
        > >
        >
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