Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [free_energy] sad but true ( LOL )

Expand Messages
  • Bob Dubner
    Paul -- I indeed did not catch the tube in your Illustration 1; compared to the boldness of the other drawing elements, I thought it was a dimensional marking
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2001
      Paul -- I indeed did not catch the tube in your Illustration 1; compared to
      the boldness of the other drawing elements, I thought it was a dimensional
      marking indicating the A-B height distance.

      I do not wish to prolong this unduly; I suspect that a lot of the people
      monitoring this list are finding this tiresome. Nonetheless, since I now
      have a better picture of what you are trying to do, I'll make one more
      comment and hope that it is the last one necessary.

      In http://www.wayxcable.com/~paul/17.jpg you show that there are always at
      least 9 water-filled cylinders on the left side. Each one has 2.04 pounds
      of water in them, and that therefore there is always 18.36 more pounds on
      the left side than the right. That difference can be as much as 10
      water-filled cylinders, so the excess weight on the left varies from 18.36
      to 20.40 pounds. On average, the downward force on the left side from that
      water will be about 19 pounds.

      But, as I mentioned in my shorter message, you are ignoring the effects of
      the asymmetric distribution of the weights in the pistons. In your
      Illustration 1, the net effect of those weights is zero, since they are
      distributed symmetrically, left and right. But rotate the belt
      counter-clockwise by one-half a piston, so that the bottommost and topmost
      pistons are lying horizontal, and we find 11 weights on the left, and 13
      weights on the right.

      According to your figures, those weights are each 67.88 pounds. Two of them
      together weigh 135.76 pounds. On average, as the belt moves, the downward
      force from those weights will be about 68 pounds.

      Now, I'll grant you that you have me at a disadvantage. After all, I am
      saddled with a degree in engineering, and all those engineering, physics,
      material science, and math courses may have damaged me. I am sure that the
      graduate courses I've taken, and all the machines that I have designed --
      and built, I might add -- over the twenty-five years that I have been a
      practicing electrical engineer may also prevent me from visualizing with the
      clarity that your evident rudeness, apparent lack of practical experience,
      and self-proclaimed ignorance grant to you. Perhaps my possibly
      shortsighted prejudice that doing physical calculations to 30-digit accuracy
      is a complete waste of time also prevents my developing a meaningingful
      insight into your grand design.

      But, I am always ready to learn. I breathlessly anticipate enlightenment.
      I eagerly await your explanation as to how 19 pounds of water on the left
      side can lift 68 pounds of metal weights on the right side.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.