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Thoughts on better audience interaction

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  • Viksit Gaur
    Hullo, Just thinking about this on IRC - possible methods of getting the crowd to interact with each other and not just run away after attending a talk. In the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 28, 2005
      Hullo,

      Just thinking about this on IRC - possible methods of
      getting the
      crowd to interact with each other and not just run
      away after
      attending a talk.

      In the normal course of events, you'd have a talk, 10
      minute
      interaction with the speaker, a cup of tea outside(?!)
      and .. Next
      Talk, in Hall down the corridor. For an event like
      this which is
      community driven, I guess this isn't the best method
      to hold the
      participants in sway...

      Instead, divide each talk into certain groups or parts
      - these are
      logical assignments/divisions, and dont in any way
      affect the content
      of the talk. Each of these groups could have a
      temporary SIG attached
      to it, which could meet after the talk is over in an
      aclove or lawn
      someplace.

      How this would work could well be illustrated by a
      fictitious talk on
      Bluetooth. It could have a technical and a commercial
      SIG attached to
      it. (Depending on the profile of the intended
      audience, these
      classifications can be designed better). Thus, techies
      who want to
      hack on the latest version of BlueZ could go one way,
      and CTOs
      interested in adapting a particular trend in BT could
      go another.
      Again, the schedule would have to account for things
      like this - but
      as usual, I'm sure there are refinements to such a
      technique.

      What say BLUG? :)

      Cheers,
      Viksit

      --
      Viksit Gaur
      Deptt of CS&E, Yale University
      http://viksit.com



      ____________________________________________________
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    • Devdas Bhagat
      ... Actually, looking at the OLS schedule and Kalyan s suggestions, I would run a schedule like this: 1000 - 1100 talk 1100 - 1130 break 1130 - 1230 talk 1230
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 28, 2005
        On 28/07/05 12:20 -0700, Viksit Gaur wrote:
        > Hullo,
        >
        > Just thinking about this on IRC - possible methods of getting the
        > crowd to interact with each other and not just run away after
        > attending a talk.
        >
        > In the normal course of events, you'd have a talk, 10 minute
        > interaction with the speaker, a cup of tea outside(?!) and .. Next
        > Talk, in Hall down the corridor. For an event like this which is
        > community driven, I guess this isn't the best method to hold the
        > participants in sway...
        >
        Actually, looking at the OLS schedule and Kalyan's suggestions, I would
        run a schedule like this:
        1000 - 1100 talk
        1100 - 1130 break
        1130 - 1230 talk
        1230 - 1330 lunch
        1330 - 1430 talk
        1430 - 1500 break
        1530 - 1630 talk
        1630 - 1700 break
        1700 - 1800 BOF.

        > Instead, divide each talk into certain groups or parts - these are
        > logical assignments/divisions, and dont in any way affect the content
        > of the talk. Each of these groups could have a temporary SIG attached
        > to it, which could meet after the talk is over in an aclove or lawn
        > someplace.
        >
        > How this would work could well be illustrated by a fictitious talk on
        > Bluetooth. It could have a technical and a commercial SIG attached to
        > it. (Depending on the profile of the intended audience, these
        > classifications can be designed better). Thus, techies who want to
        > hack on the latest version of BlueZ could go one way, and CTOs
        > interested in adapting a particular trend in BT could go another.
        > Again, the schedule would have to account for things like this - but
        > as usual, I'm sure there are refinements to such a technique.
        >
        Ideally, we don't want a formal talk schedule. We want to be able to put
        a whiteboard there, have a bunch of clued people come in, schedule their
        talks and run the show.

        The problem is that we have too many people instead of a small, limited,
        focussed audience, so we can't do that.

        Devdas Bhagat
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