Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

senior high school student who needs some help :)

Expand Messages
  • alex_s1813
    Hi everyone! I m new here and I hope finding this group is going to be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I m a grade 12 student. I m seriously
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 30, 2003
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
      be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
      student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
      need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
      am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
      ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
      etc. Maybe someone can help me?

      What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
      fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
      would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
      investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
      being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
      is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
      out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
      while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
      what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
      ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
      lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!

      Alex
    • dutraa
      It is possible that if you become a criminalist who performs DNA analysis in California you will sometimes go to crime scenes. Mostly for blood spatter
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2003
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        It is possible that if you become a criminalist who performs DNA
        analysis in California you will sometimes go to crime scenes. Mostly
        for blood spatter interpretation. I know of no crime scene personnel
        that sometimes do DNA analysis

        Adam Dutra
        San Diego Police Department

        --- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, "alex_s1813"
        <polak_princess@h...> wrote:
        > Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
        > be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
        > student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
        > need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
        > am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
        > ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
        > etc. Maybe someone can help me?
        >
        > What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
        > fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
        > would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
        > investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
        > being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
        > is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
        > out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
        > while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
        > what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
        > ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
        > lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!
        >
        > Alex
      • Layla Leal
        Hi Alex, I am currently a 2nd year graduate student at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth. I am getting my masters in
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 2, 2003
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Alex,
          I am currently a 2nd year graduate student at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth. I am getting my masters in Biomedical Sciences with a concentration in Forensic Genetics. I got my undergraduate degree in Biology. The program that I am currently in at UNTHSC-FW, specializes in training individuals to be DNA Analysts. It is the only program (that I know of) in the US that has this specific program. It is a 2 year program (after Undergraduate), and they are looking to start a PhD program as well. I know that you are barely a senior, so therefore, this currently is not an option for you. There are only 13 students in my class (that were accepted) and 10 for this upcoming year (therefore, you can tell that it is somewhat competitive). The students in my class have degrees ranging from genetics, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and microbiology, just to name a few. Basically, if you have an undergraduate degree in some sort of science, maintain a
          good GPA, and are able to do good on the GRE (Graduate Record Examination), then this may be what you are looking for. I hope this wasn't too confusing. If you have any questions feel free to email and ask.

          Thanks,
          Barbara

          alex_s1813 <polak_princess@...> wrote:
          Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
          be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
          student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
          need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
          am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
          ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
          etc. Maybe someone can help me?

          What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
          fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
          would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
          investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
          being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
          is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
          out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
          while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
          what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
          ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
          lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!

          Alex



          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          To subscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
          From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          SBC Yahoo! DSL - Now only $29.95 per month!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert Parsons
          Alex, Don t be confused by what you see on TV - real forensic science and CSI work is nothing like they show it on the CSI TV show. Here s the general gist
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 3, 2003
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Alex,

            Don't be confused by what you see on TV - real forensic science and CSI
            work is nothing like they show it on the "CSI" TV show. Here's the
            general gist of things - CSIs work in the field and forensic scientists
            work in the lab - two different jobs done by different people with
            different skills and educational backgrounds. Most CSIs aren't
            qualified to do DNA profiling or any other kind of laboratory testing.
            They aren't scientists and don't analyze evidence; they also aren't
            detectives and don't track down bad guys or make arrests - they are
            specially trained cops or civilian crime scene technicians whose only
            job is to locate, collect, and preserve evidence from the scene. Some
            may do some scene interpretation with things like blood spatter, but for
            the most part forensic analysis is not part of their job. They collect
            evidence, send it to the crime lab for analysis by real forensic
            scientists, go back to their office and write their report, then wait
            for another crime scene - that's all. Few have any scientific
            educational background, and many don't have a college degree of any kind
            (nor do they really need one to do what they do). However, they still
            have very important jobs and must be well trained and highly skilled to
            do the job properly.

            Conversely, most forensic scientists work almost exclusively in the lab
            and rarely if ever go to crime scenes (I've been doing this work for 22
            years and have never been to a crime scene). There are some forensic
            scientists who do occasionally (or more rarely, regularly) work crime
            scenes, but for the most part we stay in the lab and do our work there.


            There are over 400 forensic science/crime labs in the USA; most are
            publicly run, but some are private. In most labs, the jobs are highly
            specialized. For example, if you do DNA work, that is ALL you do - you
            don't analyze drugs or glass or fibers or anything else, just DNA.
            Those other types of analyses would be done by other people who
            specialize in them.

            For an overview of the forensic science profession and the specialties
            within it, check out the American Academy of Forensic Science's "So You
            Want to be a Forensic Scientist?" page here:
            http://www.aafs.org/?section_id=resources&page_id=choosing_a_career"

            Bob Parsons, F-ABC
            Forensic Chemist
            Indian River Crime Laboratory
            Ft. Pierce, FL

            -----Original Message-----
            From: alex_s1813 [mailto:polak_princess@...]
            Sent: Monday, June 30, 2003 10:29 PM
            To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [forensic-science] senior high school student who needs some
            help :)

            Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
            be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
            student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
            need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
            am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
            ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
            etc. Maybe someone can help me?

            What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
            fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
            would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
            investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
            being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
            is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
            out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
            while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
            what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
            ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
            lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!

            Alex




            To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
            From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
            links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
            settings.

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • wallylind
            I would add that the vast majority of crime scene investgation is done by police patrol officers and investigators, some of whom have had specialized training
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 4, 2003
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              I would add that the vast majority of crime scene investgation is done by police patrol officers and investigators, some of whom have had specialized training in the necessary skills. I would also add that there are almost no departments left that don't require at least a two year college degree for entry level police officers. If your looking for promotion or any kind of specialized assignment, like career CSI work, a four year degree is smart. Even the civilian sector of criime scene work mainly requires some college and the well paid positions require degrees. .Also there is some forensic work done by crime scene investigators and some detectives, mainly in bloodsain pattern analysis, shooting reconstruction, and general crime scene reconstruction. Many department now do routine development and prepatory work before sending evidence to the lab (chemical and physical developement of print or location of semen stains, for example). Its always nice to have an educational background to point to when testifying in these areas. While in college, I also worked as a part-time technician in a viral genetics lab, which also added crediblity to my court testimeony. My point for Alex and others looking at a Crime Scene Investigation, as opposed to forensic science, career is that CSI is not a way of getting to do the sexy work you see on TV, without doing the work of getting a good college education.
              Wally Lind
              Senior Crime Scene Analyst

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Robert Parsons
              To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2003 6:29 PM
              Subject: RE: [forensic-science] senior high school student who needs some help :)


              Alex,

              Don't be confused by what you see on TV - real forensic science and CSI
              work is nothing like they show it on the "CSI" TV show. Here's the
              general gist of things - CSIs work in the field and forensic scientists
              work in the lab - two different jobs done by different people with
              different skills and educational backgrounds. Most CSIs aren't
              qualified to do DNA profiling or any other kind of laboratory testing.
              They aren't scientists and don't analyze evidence; they also aren't
              detectives and don't track down bad guys or make arrests - they are
              specially trained cops or civilian crime scene technicians whose only
              job is to locate, collect, and preserve evidence from the scene. Some
              may do some scene interpretation with things like blood spatter, but for
              the most part forensic analysis is not part of their job. They collect
              evidence, send it to the crime lab for analysis by real forensic
              scientists, go back to their office and write their report, then wait
              for another crime scene - that's all. Few have any scientific
              educational background, and many don't have a college degree of any kind
              (nor do they really need one to do what they do). However, they still
              have very important jobs and must be well trained and highly skilled to
              do the job properly.

              Conversely, most forensic scientists work almost exclusively in the lab
              and rarely if ever go to crime scenes (I've been doing this work for 22
              years and have never been to a crime scene). There are some forensic
              scientists who do occasionally (or more rarely, regularly) work crime
              scenes, but for the most part we stay in the lab and do our work there.


              There are over 400 forensic science/crime labs in the USA; most are
              publicly run, but some are private. In most labs, the jobs are highly
              specialized. For example, if you do DNA work, that is ALL you do - you
              don't analyze drugs or glass or fibers or anything else, just DNA.
              Those other types of analyses would be done by other people who
              specialize in them.

              For an overview of the forensic science profession and the specialties
              within it, check out the American Academy of Forensic Science's "So You
              Want to be a Forensic Scientist?" page here:
              http://www.aafs.org/?section_id=resources&page_id=choosing_a_career"

              Bob Parsons, F-ABC
              Forensic Chemist
              Indian River Crime Laboratory
              Ft. Pierce, FL

              -----Original Message-----
              From: alex_s1813 [mailto:polak_princess@...]
              Sent: Monday, June 30, 2003 10:29 PM
              To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [forensic-science] senior high school student who needs some
              help :)

              Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
              be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
              student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
              need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
              am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
              ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
              etc. Maybe someone can help me?

              What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
              fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
              would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
              investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
              being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
              is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
              out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
              while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
              what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
              ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
              lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!

              Alex




              To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
              forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
              forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
              From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
              links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
              settings.

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              ADVERTISEMENT




              To subscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
              From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kate Meakim
              Hi Alex Most forensic work is in the lab. So you are in luck! At least where I am from, the scientists never go to the crime scenes. They have crime scene
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 14, 2003
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Alex
                Most forensic work is in the lab. So you are in luck! At least where I am from, the scientists never go to the crime scenes. They have crime scene techs to handle this. The actual job title varies by lab. Some are called forensic scientists, lab techs, etc. If you get a job in a DNA lab, you will basically nothing but DNA analysis.

                A major in Biology or genetics would get you on the right track. Take courses such as molecular bio, stats, etc...required by most labs if you want to do DNA. Also try to get an internship in a crime lab as soon as possible. Volunteer if you have to...this field is incredibly hard to break into so experience is the key. The job can be very gratifying but except it to be a hard field to get into. Once you get your foot in the door, the opportunities are endless!

                alex_s1813 <polak_princess@...> wrote:
                Hi everyone! I'm new here and I hope finding this group is going to
                be very beneficial for me. My name is Alex, and I'm a grade 12
                student. I'm seriously thinking about what to do in my future and I
                need a little bit of help. Forensics has always fascinated me, but I
                am unfamiliar with it's many specialties. I have an image of my
                ideal career in my head, but I don't know what that career is called,
                etc. Maybe someone can help me?

                What I would LOVE to do is work in a lab. Genetics is what
                fascinates me most, and I'm considering majoring in genetics. I
                would like to be involved in analyzing DNA samples for crime scene
                investigation purposes. Therefore, I'm thinking about not actually
                being at the crime scene... kind of a behind the scenes career. But
                is this career simply a lab tech? Are there specific forensics labs
                out there, or would DNA profiling for CSI's simply be a once in a
                while task for me? I'm very confused... can anyone help me out with
                what career I'm thinking about? I'd also love to research genetics...
                ahh! What is this career? I want to be involved with forensics in a
                lab sort of way... any ideas? Thank you soooo much in advance!

                Alex



                Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                To subscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to: forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
                From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                ---------------------------------
                Do you Yahoo!?
                SBC Yahoo! DSL - Now only $29.95 per month!

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.