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info on seminars/courses/internships

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  • starlight2775
    Hi. I m new to the board too. I m looking for any advice/info. on on- line degrees (good schools?), seminars in the pacific NW area, and internships (programs,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2002
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      Hi. I'm new to the board too. I'm looking for any advice/info. on on-
      line degrees (good schools?), seminars in the pacific NW area, and
      internships (programs, websites ??). Right now I'm trying to decide
      which specialty to go into (arson investigation, latent
      prints ...?). Thanks.
    • Robert Parsons
      If you re serious about a career in forensic science (not in crime investigation), forget on-line programs and short courses. They aren t enough. You need a
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 11, 2002
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        If you're serious about a career in forensic science (not in crime
        investigation), forget on-line programs and short courses. They aren't
        enough. You need a four-year science degree, preferably in chemistry,
        biology, or forensic science.

        Fire debris (arson) analysts are analytical chemists who identify the
        petroleum products and other flammable liquid residues that remain in the
        debris after an arson, so you need an analytical chemistry background to do
        that work. Fire scene investigators, however, are usually fire marshals or
        sometimes police officers/detectives who have special training in locating
        the point of origin of the fire - they then dig there and send the samples
        they collect to the chemist in the laboratory who does the analysis. Fire
        scene investigation training can't be done on-line either, you need hands-on
        training in a formal fire investigation program.

        Latent print examinations are mastered in an apprenticeship with an
        experienced latent print examiner, although there are introductory courses
        offered at police academies and in university criminal justice programs that
        will give you a start. Hands-on training is again needed, followed by an
        apprenticeship with an experienced fingerprint expert. On-line courses
        might give you an introduction, but you won't get far with them alone. If
        all you want to do is learn to lift latent prints and take rolled prints
        (like any good cop can do), then you can learn that at any local police
        academy, but if you want to learn to identify them you'll need formal
        training that can't be had on-line or through short courses alone. If you
        want to do fingerprint work in a forensic laboratory, you'll need to either
        have prior law enforcement experience doing that kind of work, or get a
        4-year degree, again preferably in science. College degrees are required
        (and science degrees preferred) by many labs today even for traditional
        "police-type" specialties like firearms examination and fingerprint
        examination, because of increasing certification and accreditation
        requirements.

        Forensics is a highly technical field requiring an in-depth formal
        education. There is no short cut or easy way to enter the field - it will
        take years of full-time (or a great many years of part-time) hard work as a
        student to become qualified. I recommend you plan on getting a four-year
        science degree. Before long, you'll need one to even be considered for any
        position in this field. It's already required for most positions. Good
        luck.

        Bob Parsons, F-ABC
        Forensic Chemist

        -----Original Message-----
        From: starlight2775 [mailto:starlight2775@...]
        Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 21:34
        To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [forensic-science] info on seminars/courses/internships


        Hi. I'm new to the board too. I'm looking for any advice/info. on on-
        line degrees (good schools?), seminars in the pacific NW area, and
        internships (programs, websites ??). Right now I'm trying to decide
        which specialty to go into (arson investigation, latent
        prints ...?). Thanks.




        To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
        forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
        forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
        From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes links
        to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • hobbit@oldowl.com
        way to go Bob ... From: Robert Parsons To: Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002 4:11 PM Subject: RE:
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 14, 2002
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          way to go Bob
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Robert Parsons" <rparsons@...>
          To: <forensic-science@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002 4:11 PM
          Subject: RE: [forensic-science] info on seminars/courses/internships


          > If you're serious about a career in forensic science (not in crime
          > investigation), forget on-line programs and short courses. They aren't
          > enough. You need a four-year science degree, preferably in chemistry,
          > biology, or forensic science.
          >
          > Fire debris (arson) analysts are analytical chemists who identify the
          > petroleum products and other flammable liquid residues that remain in the
          > debris after an arson, so you need an analytical chemistry background to
          do
          > that work. Fire scene investigators, however, are usually fire marshals
          or
          > sometimes police officers/detectives who have special training in locating
          > the point of origin of the fire - they then dig there and send the samples
          > they collect to the chemist in the laboratory who does the analysis. Fire
          > scene investigation training can't be done on-line either, you need
          hands-on
          > training in a formal fire investigation program.
          >
          > Latent print examinations are mastered in an apprenticeship with an
          > experienced latent print examiner, although there are introductory courses
          > offered at police academies and in university criminal justice programs
          that
          > will give you a start. Hands-on training is again needed, followed by an
          > apprenticeship with an experienced fingerprint expert. On-line courses
          > might give you an introduction, but you won't get far with them alone. If
          > all you want to do is learn to lift latent prints and take rolled prints
          > (like any good cop can do), then you can learn that at any local police
          > academy, but if you want to learn to identify them you'll need formal
          > training that can't be had on-line or through short courses alone. If you
          > want to do fingerprint work in a forensic laboratory, you'll need to
          either
          > have prior law enforcement experience doing that kind of work, or get a
          > 4-year degree, again preferably in science. College degrees are required
          > (and science degrees preferred) by many labs today even for traditional
          > "police-type" specialties like firearms examination and fingerprint
          > examination, because of increasing certification and accreditation
          > requirements.
          >
          > Forensics is a highly technical field requiring an in-depth formal
          > education. There is no short cut or easy way to enter the field - it will
          > take years of full-time (or a great many years of part-time) hard work as
          a
          > student to become qualified. I recommend you plan on getting a four-year
          > science degree. Before long, you'll need one to even be considered for
          any
          > position in this field. It's already required for most positions. Good
          > luck.
          >
          > Bob Parsons, F-ABC
          > Forensic Chemist
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: starlight2775 [mailto:starlight2775@...]
          > Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 21:34
          > To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [forensic-science] info on seminars/courses/internships
          >
          >
          > Hi. I'm new to the board too. I'm looking for any advice/info. on on-
          > line degrees (good schools?), seminars in the pacific NW area, and
          > internships (programs, websites ??). Right now I'm trying to decide
          > which specialty to go into (arson investigation, latent
          > prints ...?). Thanks.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
          > forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
          > forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
          > >From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
          links
          > to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
          forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
          forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
          > >From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
          links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
          settings.
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • hobbit@oldowl.com
          sounds very interesting Bob..all of it ... From: Robert Parsons To: Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 16, 2002
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            sounds very interesting Bob..all of it


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Robert Parsons" <rparsons@...>
            To: <forensic-science@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002 4:11 PM
            Subject: RE: [forensic-science] info on seminars/courses/internships


            > If you're serious about a career in forensic science (not in crime
            > investigation), forget on-line programs and short courses. They aren't
            > enough. You need a four-year science degree, preferably in chemistry,
            > biology, or forensic science.
            >
            > Fire debris (arson) analysts are analytical chemists who identify the
            > petroleum products and other flammable liquid residues that remain in the
            > debris after an arson, so you need an analytical chemistry background to
            do
            > that work. Fire scene investigators, however, are usually fire marshals
            or
            > sometimes police officers/detectives who have special training in locating
            > the point of origin of the fire - they then dig there and send the samples
            > they collect to the chemist in the laboratory who does the analysis. Fire
            > scene investigation training can't be done on-line either, you need
            hands-on
            > training in a formal fire investigation program.
            >
            > Latent print examinations are mastered in an apprenticeship with an
            > experienced latent print examiner, although there are introductory courses
            > offered at police academies and in university criminal justice programs
            that
            > will give you a start. Hands-on training is again needed, followed by an
            > apprenticeship with an experienced fingerprint expert. On-line courses
            > might give you an introduction, but you won't get far with them alone. If
            > all you want to do is learn to lift latent prints and take rolled prints
            > (like any good cop can do), then you can learn that at any local police
            > academy, but if you want to learn to identify them you'll need formal
            > training that can't be had on-line or through short courses alone. If you
            > want to do fingerprint work in a forensic laboratory, you'll need to
            either
            > have prior law enforcement experience doing that kind of work, or get a
            > 4-year degree, again preferably in science. College degrees are required
            > (and science degrees preferred) by many labs today even for traditional
            > "police-type" specialties like firearms examination and fingerprint
            > examination, because of increasing certification and accreditation
            > requirements.
            >
            > Forensics is a highly technical field requiring an in-depth formal
            > education. There is no short cut or easy way to enter the field - it will
            > take years of full-time (or a great many years of part-time) hard work as
            a
            > student to become qualified. I recommend you plan on getting a four-year
            > science degree. Before long, you'll need one to even be considered for
            any
            > position in this field. It's already required for most positions. Good
            > luck.
            >
            > Bob Parsons, F-ABC
            > Forensic Chemist
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: starlight2775 [mailto:starlight2775@...]
            > Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 21:34
            > To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [forensic-science] info on seminars/courses/internships
            >
            >
            > Hi. I'm new to the board too. I'm looking for any advice/info. on on-
            > line degrees (good schools?), seminars in the pacific NW area, and
            > internships (programs, websites ??). Right now I'm trying to decide
            > which specialty to go into (arson investigation, latent
            > prints ...?). Thanks.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            > forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            > forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
            > >From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
            links
            > to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account settings.
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
            > >From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
            links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
            settings.
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
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