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[forensic-science] Re: question

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  • Carla Noziglia
    May be old hat, but DNA profiles of horses and dogs to prove their lineage. Carla Noziglia ... Dear gang; can you all offer suggestions on the latest, most
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 28, 2000
      May be old hat, but DNA profiles of horses and dogs to prove their lineage.

      Carla Noziglia

      >>> "Bieber, Frederick R.,Ph.D." <FRBIEBER@...> 02/28 4:41 PM >>>
      Dear gang; can you all offer suggestions on the latest, most interesting new
      developments in forensics,,,
      i've been asked to give a talk to the D.A.'s association... and am looking for
      new topics to excite them about...;.
      one idea i have is about diamond fingerprinting...
      any suggestions are welcome,
      many thank, fred bieber/aafs member
      ?


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    • jen
      Hi I hope this is ok to ask here I just had a quick question about organic chemistry and I figured many of you would likely be familiar with it. I was just
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 21, 2001
        Hi

        I hope this is ok to ask here I just had a quick question about
        organic chemistry and I figured many of you would likely be familiar
        with it. I was just wondering what the purpose of refluxing a
        solution before distillation is. Im trying to do my lab write up for
        my course and I am getting stumped on this point. Any help would be
        appreciated.
        Thanks
        Jen
      • Robert Parsons
        Many synthetic reactions require elevated temperatures to produce a good product yield in a reasonable time, typically done by having the reaction take place
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 21, 2001
          RE: [forensic-science] question

          Many synthetic reactions require elevated temperatures to produce a good product yield in a reasonable time, typically done by having the reaction take place in a boiling solvent.  Refluxing refers to using a condenser (a tube with a cooling water jacket) directly above the reaction vessel to condense the vapors produced by the boiling solvent and return them to the reaction mixture.  This prevents loss of vaporized solvent, reactants, and products, and allows the reaction to go to completion.  Distillation differs in that the condenser uses a side arm to divert the condensed vapors to a separate collection vessel, which allows the separation of compounds which boil at lower temperatures from those with higher boiling points.

          Here's a site that gives a quick overview of refluxing:
          http://www.kolias.com/science/refluxing.htm

          Bob Parsons, F-ABC
          Forensic Chemist
          Regional Crime Laboratory
          at Indian River Community College
          Ft. Pierce, FL


          -----Original Message-----
          From: jen [mailto:jen_eeyoretoo@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2001 09:47
          To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [forensic-science] question


          Hi

          I hope this is ok to ask here I just had a quick question about
          organic chemistry and I figured many of you would likely be familiar
          with it. I was just wondering what the purpose of refluxing a
          solution before distillation is. Im trying to do my lab write up for
          my course and I am getting stumped on this point. Any help would be
          appreciated.
          Thanks
          Jen


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        • jen
          Thank you ~jen ... good ... reaction ... condenser (a ... vessel to ... to the ... reactants, and ... Distillation differs ... vapors to a ... compounds which
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 21, 2001
            Thank you
            ~jen

            --- In forensic-science@y..., Robert Parsons <rparsons@i...> wrote:
            > Many synthetic reactions require elevated temperatures to produce a
            good
            > product yield in a reasonable time, typically done by having the
            reaction
            > take place in a boiling solvent. Refluxing refers to using a
            condenser (a
            > tube with a cooling water jacket) directly above the reaction
            vessel to
            > condense the vapors produced by the boiling solvent and return them
            to the
            > reaction mixture. This prevents loss of vaporized solvent,
            reactants, and
            > products, and allows the reaction to go to completion.
            Distillation differs
            > in that the condenser uses a side arm to divert the condensed
            vapors to a
            > separate collection vessel, which allows the separation of
            compounds which
            > boil at lower temperatures from those with higher boiling points.
            >
            > Here's a site that gives a quick overview of refluxing:
            > http://www.kolias.com/science/refluxing.htm
            >
            > Bob Parsons, F-ABC
            > Forensic Chemist
            > Regional Crime Laboratory
            > at Indian River Community College
            > Ft. Pierce, FL
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: jen [mailto:jen_eeyoretoo@y...]
            > Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2001 09:47
            > To: forensic-science@y...
            > Subject: [forensic-science] question
            >
            >
            > Hi
            >
            > I hope this is ok to ask here I just had a quick question about
            > organic chemistry and I figured many of you would likely be
            familiar
            > with it. I was just wondering what the purpose of refluxing a
            > solution before distillation is. Im trying to do my lab write up
            for
            > my course and I am getting stumped on this point. Any help would be
            > appreciated.
            > Thanks
            > Jen
            >
            >
            >
            > To subscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            > forensic-science-subscribe@y...
            > To unsubscribe send a blank e-mail to:
            > forensic-science-unsubscribe@y...
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            > Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
            > From the home page you can search the list archives. It also
            includes links
            > to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
            settings.
            >
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          • Lisa
            I am interested in this field as well as make-up for movies. Does anyone know where to find pictures of stab wounds and others to use for replication on a
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 5, 2003
              I am interested in this field as well as make-up for movies. Does
              anyone know where to find pictures of stab wounds and others to use
              for replication on a movie set?
              Lisa
            • rthonor2001
              I am just a lurker and had a question about decompositon of human bodies. In very hot weather (100 degrees), what is the probably distance that a person could
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 8 4:57 AM
                I am just a lurker and had a question about decompositon of human
                bodies. In very hot weather (100 degrees), what is the probably
                distance that a person could possible smell a human body that had
                been outside for 4 weeks? I was told that humans do not smell like
                other animals and that the smell may not be recognized as death.
                Thanks in advance.
              • skadess1
                does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?
                Message 7 of 15 , Oct 13, 2003
                  does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?
                • Daryl W. Clemens
                  ... Not very long. Something like 30 seconds or so. Regards, Daryl ... Daryl W. Clemens Editor, Crime and Clues http://www.crimeandclues.com Moderator,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Oct 14, 2003
                    > does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?

                    Not very long. Something like 30 seconds or so.


                    Regards,

                    Daryl

                    -------------------------------------------------------------
                    Daryl W. Clemens

                    Editor, Crime and Clues
                    http://www.crimeandclues.com

                    Moderator, forensic-science mail list
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science/
                    -------------------------------------------------------------
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "skadess1" <skadess1@...>
                    To: <forensic-science@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, October 13, 2003 10:44 PM
                    Subject: [forensic-science] question


                    > does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • wallylind
                    Luminol continues to fluoresce brightly enough to photograph for a matter of minutes, ten or so. If you are going to photograph it, have your camera set up (on
                    Message 9 of 15 , Oct 14, 2003
                      Luminol continues to fluoresce brightly enough to photograph for a matter of minutes, ten or so. If you are going to photograph it, have your camera set up (on a tripod, with the camera on "bulb"setting) and focused before you darken the room. The procedure is best done at night, especially outdoors. Have a supply of luminol ready so you can respray the blood, after a few minutes. You want a 30-45 second exposure for a really nice photo. There is a product called "Hemaglow" (sp) that lasts a little longer and glows a little brighter. I think maybe ODV sells it, but I'm not sure. Some people also use Flouricine (sp) and like it better than luminol. I didn't see the improvement, myself.
                      Wally Lind
                      Senior Crime Scene Analyst
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: skadess1
                      To: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Monday, October 13, 2003 9:44 PM
                      Subject: [forensic-science] question


                      does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?



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                    • Steven Staggs
                      About 30 seconds each application (it is typically applied twice during photographic documentation).
                      Message 10 of 15 , Oct 14, 2003
                        About 30 seconds each application (it is typically applied twice during photographic documentation).

                        ---Steve

                        Skadess1 <skadess1@...> wrote :

                        > does anyone know how long luminol stays flourescent on a bllod stain?
                        >
                      • Mick (or Mike)
                        Steve Re exposure times. What ASA film do you use? I have used 400. Have you tried a more sensative film? I wonder what quality would result? Would more
                        Message 11 of 15 , Oct 15, 2003
                          Steve

                          Re exposure times. What ASA film do you use?
                          I have used 400.

                          Have you tried a more sensative film?
                          I wonder what quality would result?
                          Would more sensative emulsion mean you could
                          use less Luminol

                          Mick T.
                          Crime Scene/Fire Investigator.
                          Central UK,

                          WWW.FIRE-INVESTIGATION.ORG

                          --- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, Steven Staggs <staggs@p...>
                          wrote:
                          > About 30 seconds each application (it is typically applied twice
                          during photographic documentation).
                        • Steven Staggs
                          Mick--- I use 400 speed film. It works well and I have not felt a need to try anything else. I would expect that if you used 800 speed film you could get away
                          Message 12 of 15 , Oct 15, 2003
                            Mick---

                            I use 400 speed film. It works well and I have not felt a need to try
                            anything else. I would expect that if you used 800 speed film you could get
                            away with one application of Luminol.

                            ---Steve

                            At 11:16 PM 10/15/2003 +0000, you wrote:
                            >Steve
                            >
                            >Re exposure times. What ASA film do you use?
                            >I have used 400.
                            >
                            >Have you tried a more sensative film?
                            >I wonder what quality would result?
                            >Would more sensative emulsion mean you could
                            >use less Luminol
                            >
                            >Mick T.
                            >Crime Scene/Fire Investigator.
                            >Central UK,
                            >
                            > WWW.FIRE-INVESTIGATION.ORG
                            >
                            >--- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, Steven Staggs <staggs@p...>
                            >wrote:
                            > > About 30 seconds each application (it is typically applied twice
                            >during photographic documentation).
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
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                            >to: forensic-science-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                            >to: forensic-science-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                            >Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forensic-science
                            > >From the home page you can search the list archives. It also includes
                            > links to forensic science sites and allows you to modify your account
                            > settings.
                            >
                            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                          • Mick (or Mike)
                            Thanks Steve Maybe OK in the case of recording general blood distribution. But in the case of revealing fine detail and later DNA analysis. For example a case
                            Message 13 of 15 , Oct 17, 2003
                              Thanks Steve

                              Maybe OK in the case of recording general blood distribution.
                              But in the case of revealing fine detail and later DNA analysis.

                              For example a case where offender becomes injured during the act
                              of killing someone. To make things worse the murder occurred on a
                              RED carpet. Lots of blood around, particularly that of the deceased!

                              Nightmare Huh! >:-(

                              (Disclaimer: This is not an actual case, just an example)

                              Mick T.
                              Crime Scene/Fire Investigator.
                              Central UK,
                              WWW.FIRE-INVESTIGATION.ORG

                              ----- Original Message -----


                              --- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, Steven Staggs <staggs@p...>
                              wrote:
                              > I use 400 speed film. It works well and I have not felt a need to
                              >try anything else. I would expect that if you used 800 speed film
                              >you could get away with one application of Luminol.
                              > ---Steve
                            • Jurydoctor@aol.com
                              Does the fact that a person is a necrophiliac qualify them as a homicidal maniac? I tried looking it up on the Internet but couldn t find anything specific.
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 9 8:23 AM
                                Does the fact that a person is a necrophiliac qualify them as a homicidal
                                maniac? I tried looking it up on the Internet but couldn't find anything
                                specific. I even tried a medical dictionary. Do you know what the characteristics
                                of such a person might be? Not long ago I read an article on the subject but
                                can't remember where I saw it. Are there medical terms that describe a person
                                who may be a borderline homicidal maniac?


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