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Re: Polygraph and Internship question

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  • Dan Morgan
    When I say, don t worry about it I mean, tell them the truth, that s all they are looking for. Smoking pot once, twice, three times isn t a big deal. More
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 1, 2007
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      When I say, "don't worry about it" I mean, tell them the truth,
      that's all they are looking for. Smoking pot once, twice, three
      times isn't a big deal. More than five might be questionable but as
      long as you haven't experimented with other drugs, most agencies do
      not worry about marijuana experimentation. Stay positive and be
      honest.

      Dan


      --- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Morgan"
      <morgan_danielj@...> wrote:
      >
      > Don't even worry about it Jenny
      >
      >
      > --- In forensic-science@yahoogroups.com, "Gerrit Volckeryck"
      > <gerrit.volckeryck@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Jenny,
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Did you inhale ?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Gerrit
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > _____
      > >
      > > Van: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
      > > [mailto:forensic-science@yahoogroups.com] Namens forensicgirl07
      > > Verzonden: maandag 19 februari 2007 18:43
      > > Aan: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
      > > Onderwerp: [forensic-science] Polygraph and Internship question
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi
      > >
      > > I have a question about applying to internships. I am a grad
      > student
      > > and must do an internship. I am filling out some forms currently
      > and
      > > in one section they ask if you have ever tried drugs in the last
      7
      > > years. I am not a drug user, but I did try it once...I am
      worried
      > that
      > > I will not get this internship now. Am I going to be banned from
      > every
      > > forensic job out there? I am really worried.
      > >
      > > I am actually the most straight laced person out there. Is that
      > one
      > > time going to prevent me from doing anything?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > Jenny
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
    • Gerrit Volckeryck
      The Belgian Federal Police is using the polygraph regularly. They have strict procedures : no one is obliged to take the test, no pregnant women, no people
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 1, 2007
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        The Belgian Federal Police is using the polygraph regularly.

        They have strict procedures : no one is obliged to take the test, no
        pregnant women, no people under influence of medicine, … Everything is
        videotaped, simple questions are being asked as reference, …

        The results : (no) lying reactions are only given when everything is
        pointing in the same direction, otherwise it’s an inconclusive test



        The polygraph is just another tool in the inquiry, giving information that
        would probably never surface otherwise.

        A lot of suspects ask themselves for a polygraph test, that is, if they know
        they’re innocent.

        Most of the test have a “no lying reactions” result and the “suspects” are
        immensely grateful.



        Some think they can beat the machine … which proves to be very hard.



        Errors are of course possible – and this possibility is always mentioned in
        the reports.

        But frankly : what is the alternative when there remain a lot of doubts,
        even after all the earlier questioning, forensic analysis, etc. ?



        Gerrit Volckeryck

        Federale Politie

        Directie Technische en Wetenschappelijke Politie

        Centrale Eenheid

        Notelaarstraat 211

        1000 Brussel

        België

        tel. 02/743.72.95

        fax. 02/743.72.98

        <mailto:gerrit.volckeryck.5696@...> gerrit.volckeryck.5696@...

        <mailto:gerrit.volckeryck@...> gerrit.volckeryck@...



        _____

        Van: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:forensic-science@yahoogroups.com] Namens ejpguerra
        Verzonden: woensdag 28 februari 2007 11:35
        Aan: forensic-science@yahoogroups.com
        Onderwerp: [forensic-science] Re: Polygraph and Internship question



        Hi Everyone,
        Speaking from a UK and European outlook I have to express surprise at
        the US belief in the Polygraph. Within the military community (which I
        have involvement) and the UK legal system the polygraph is seen at
        best as a health check and at worst a tool with which to
        intimidate/coerce a confession out of someone. The research done into
        the reliability of information gained via a polygraph has not been
        subject to randomised/double blind trials and in the main harks back
        to the Milgram experiments in conformity.
        Perhaps the subjective nature of polygraph testing should be openly
        and widely questioned?
        Yours,
        Edward Guerra
        FES
        DCMT





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • yoey6
        I find this topic interesting because we have discussed the idea of scientist vs. technician.....and I would argue that this is would be police science vs.
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 1, 2007
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          I find this topic interesting because we have discussed the idea of scientist vs.
          technician.....and I would argue that this is would be police science vs. hard science. I find it
          hard to believe that certain agencies (including some federal) use the excuse that the
          polygraph is a scientific method when interviewing scientists. The truth is that it is an
          interogation technique and should not be used to determine if a potential candidate is lying.
        • ejpguerra
          I have to agree (with Yoey6) and I m afraid to say but I do feel that Gerrit has failed to grasp that the use of a polygraph is done without comparison to any
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 1, 2007
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            I have to agree (with Yoey6) and I'm afraid to say but I do feel that
            Gerrit has failed to grasp that the use of a polygraph is done without
            comparison to any calibrated standard and almost totally dependant on
            the analysis/interpretation by a "skilled" individual (with the
            embodied inconsistencies). It cannot be described as scientific, the
            tool is not the problem.
            Are we to return to Combe (1853) and his classification of criminals
            by phrenology (by the way, his statistics weren't that bad, just
            really screwed morals).
            And dear jenny, just don't worry….

            Edward Guerra
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