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Re: german naming policy

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  • Constance
    ... Why would you want to do that? I guess it is possible, even though takes quite some effort and I think also a little (not a lot) of money for all the fees.
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 1, 2003
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      > Can you CHANGE your name when you're an adult
      > to whatever you like in
      > Germany? If so, that seems fair.

      Why would you want to do that? I guess it is possible, even though
      takes quite some effort and I think also a little (not a lot) of
      money for all the fees. But the only group of people that I can think
      of now who change their first name is people who change their gender
      (Transsexuals). I understand the reason why they want to change their
      name, for example from Michael to Silvia ...
      But otherwise usually nobody changes their name - I also don't see a
      reason why you would do that. Besides I think it would create a lot
      of chaos for the administration if everybody changed their name once
      in a while.
      Of course, there is such a thing as "Künstlername", like artist name.
      Which means that often famous people take up a different name
      (additionally), like the name they are famous for. But their "real"
      name still remains what it was when they were born. So in their tax
      declaration, they would still use their original name because that is
      the one they are registered under.
      Why do you think, it would only be fair, if Germans could change
      their name? What is wrong with keeping the name that was given to you?
      Isn't that exactly why we have this law about the name giving, to
      avoid that someones gets a silly or stupid name that he later would
      want to change?

      constance
    • Alwyn
      ... Hehehe, you mean *our* Silvia was once called Michael? :-) I believe you can change your name here by so-called deed poll, but you will have to pay, and
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 1, 2003
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        On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 03:20 pm, Constance wrote:

        > > Can you CHANGE your name when you're an adult
        > > to whatever you like in
        > > Germany? If so, that seems fair.
        >
        > Why would you want to do that? I guess it is possible, even though
        > takes quite some effort and I think also a little (not a lot) of
        > money for all the fees. But the only group of people that I can think
        > of now who change their first name is people who change their gender
        > (Transsexuals). I understand the reason why they want to change their
        > name, for example from Michael to Silvia ...

        Hehehe, you mean *our* Silvia was once called Michael? :-)

        I believe you can change your name here by so-called deed poll, but you
        will have to pay, and presumably it takes some time.

        As I understand it, you can always change your family name in the UK
        without legal intervention, since that is not given on your birth
        certificate, which only gives your forenames and the names of your
        parents.

        > But otherwise usually nobody changes their name - I also don't see a
        > reason why you would do that. Besides I think it would create a lot
        > of chaos for the administration if everybody changed their name once
        > in a while.

        Have you studied Kant? :-)

        > Of course, there is such a thing as "Künstlername", like artist name.
        > Which means that often famous people take up a different name
        > (additionally), like the name they are famous for. But their "real"
        > name still remains what it was when they were born. So in their tax
        > declaration, they would still use their original name because that is
        > the one they are registered under.

        Yes.

        > Why do you think, it would only be fair, if Germans could change
        > their name? What is wrong with keeping the name that was given to you?
        > Isn't that exactly why we have this law about the name giving, to
        > avoid that someones gets a silly or stupid name that he later would
        > want to change?

        Well, if you don't like the name your parents gave you, you should be
        free to change it. I have no doubt that that is possible in Germany,
        the same as here, for a price.

        The strangest case I came across was of a Dutchman, who his parents
        wanted called 'Jan-Willem'. They were told that no hyphens were allowed
        under Dutch law, so they had to be content with 'Jan Willem'.
        (Janwillem would have been OK, as in Janwillem van de Wetering, the
        crime novelist.) But I believe that Dutch law allows for hyphens these
        days.


        Alwyn
      • youll have to ask me that
        when my younger sister was born in Germany, we wanted to name her Robyn, but we had terrible trouble convincing the powers that be that Robyn is a girl s name
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 1, 2003
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          when my younger sister was born in Germany, we wanted to name her
          Robyn, but we had terrible trouble convincing the powers that be that
          Robyn is a girl's name in UK. they do make allowances for foreign
          names but they were adamant that naming a girl Robyn would be
          detrimental, psychologically. spelled differently but pronounced the
          same STILL amounted to a wrong-gendered name, as far as they were
          concerned.

          so finally, we argued that Robyn's father is called Leslie, which
          could just as easily be Lesley (a female name) in English, and HE
          turned out a perfectly well adapted adult...

          they allowed it, eventually.


          Heather
          *cursed with a name unpronouncable in most countries she has lived in*
        • Alwyn
          On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 04:40 pm, youll have to ask me that ... What is it about the y that makes a name feminine, that s what I d like to know.
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 1, 2003
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            On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 04:40 pm, youll have to ask me that
            wrote:

            > so finally, we argued that Robyn's father is called Leslie, which
            > could just as easily be Lesley (a female name) in English, and HE
            > turned out a perfectly well adapted adult...
            >
            > they allowed it, eventually.

            What is it about the 'y' that makes a name feminine, that's what I'd
            like to know.

            > Heather  
            > *cursed with a name unpronouncable in most countries she has lived in*

            But I'm sure Icelanders can pronounce it perfectly. Spaniards and Danes
            as well, probably, after they've been taught the sounds of the letter
            combinations.


            Alwyn
          • Jeffery
            ... It doesn t, my name is Jeffery and I don t know any girls named that.
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 1, 2003
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              > What is it about the 'y' that makes a name feminine, that's what I'd
              > like to know.
              > Alwyn

              It doesn't, my name is Jeffery and I don't know any girls named that.
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