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Re: Gaelic, Scottish, Irish...

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  • markus@club-internet.fr
    Hi Tony, Celtic languages are divided into following groups : -- continental Celtic, which includes a few dead languages such as Gaulish and Celtiberian --
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 3, 2000
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      Hi Tony,
      Celtic languages are divided into following groups :
      -- continental Celtic, which includes a few dead languages such as
      Gaulish and Celtiberian
      -- insular Celtic, which in turn is divided into :
      - Brittonic : Welsh, Breton, Cornish (not Gaelic as Lauren says,and
      indeed more or less extinct, although some people try to revive
      it)
      - Gaelic or Goidelic : Irish, Scottish, Manx (from the Isle of Man,
      quite the same status as Cornish)
      The name "Scots" is quite confusing, for sometimes it applies to
      Scottish Gaelic, but in fact, strictly speaking, Scots is a Germanic
      language, derived from Old English and parallel to modern English
      (see message #426 for further details).
      Cheers.
      Marc


      --- In foreignlanguage@egroups.com, "qpwoeiru134679 ."
      <qpwoeiru134679@h...> wrote:
      >
      > thanks.
      >
      > how about "Scotch"? i found it in an atlas... under "germanic".
      >
      > what is Scotch?
      >
      > >From: LaurenM225@a...
      > >Reply-To: foreignlanguage@egroups.com
      > >To: foreignlanguage@egroups.com
      > >Subject: Re: [foreignlanguage] Gaelic, Scottish, Irish...
      > >Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 10:35:11 EST
      > >
      > >Gaelic is part of the Celtic language group which includes Irish
      Gaelic,
      > >Scots Gaelic, Manx, and Cornish (I believe it's extinct). There
      are many
      > >similarities as well as differences between Irish and Scots
      Gaelic.
      For
      > >example, to say "I am" in Irish, you say "Tá mé", and in
      Scots
      you'd say
      > >"Tha
      > >mi." But then when you say "I am not" in Irish, it's "Níl
      mé",
      while in
      > >Scots it's "Chan eil mi." Scots Gaelic does not have eclipsis,
      which is
      > >quite common in Irish. After prepositions and in other cases,
      sometimes an
      > >extra consonant is tacked onto the front of a word, creating weird
      clusters
      > >like "bP" and "gC".
      > >
      > >There are more differences, but that's just a few of them for you
      =)
      > >-Lauren-
      > >
      > >In a message dated 11/21/00 6:25:32 PM Central Standard Time,
      > >qpwoeiru134679@h... writes:
      > >
      > > > help!
      > > >
      > > > i'm confused...
      > > >
      > > > is gaelic also irish? what is scots? are they same/similar?
      > > >
      > > > can somewhat distinguish them apart more me?
      > > >
      > > > thanks!
      > > >
      > > > tony
      >
      >
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