Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Arabic and Persian

Expand Messages
  • frank_verhoft
    Hi Piotr, Nauder, all First of all, thanks for all the explanations!!! I keep on wondering about the usage of the long forms (such as motashaker hastam) and
    Message 1 of 32 , Apr 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Piotr, Nauder, all

      First of all, thanks for all the explanations!!!

      I keep on wondering about the usage of the "long" forms (such as
      motashaker hastam) and the "short" forms motashakeram.
      Is there any difference in register (formal vs informal)?

      Furthermore, is there a tendency to use more agglutinating forms like
      azizami (or is this example completely wrong?)

      Thanks again and best regards,

      Frank
    • Piotr Kozlowski
      Vince, all ... The problem with -i is that it s neither definite nor indefinite article, or rather that sometimes it can be used the-wise and sometimes
      Message 32 of 32 , Apr 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Vince, all

        > I'm used to articles, so those shouldn't be too bad.
        > Unless the placement of them seem totally odd or
        > inconsistent or something.

        The problem with "-i" is that it's neither definite nor indefinite
        article, or rather that sometimes it can be used "the-wise" and
        sometimes "a-wise" (please don't forget that, since the concept is
        alien to me, I might be totally wrong about how do the articles
        function)

        More clearly to the point.

        The main uses of the "-i" are two.

        1. "a, some" - "naan" means "bread" "naani" - "some bread or a
        particular loaf of bread".

        Another example:

        Ketaab mikhaanam - (book I-read) - I read books (general statement)

        Ketaabi mikhaanam - (book-art. I-read) - I read a book (right now)

        2. "the... which/who"

        "Ketaabi ke khaandam kheyli jaaleb-o delchasp bud"
        (book-art. that I read(past tense) very interesting and interesting
        was)
        meaning:

        The book which I read (have read)was very interesting.

        Both "jaaleb" and "delchasp" mean roughly the same thing. It's usual
        habit to put together two (or more) words of the same meaning.

        > And why didn't you like "The Punishing Pole"? I
        > thought it was quite catchy, myself. I meant no
        > offense by it. You could use it if you ever decided to
        > become a professional wrestler.

        No offense was taken. It's just it sounded like... a professional
        wrestler's name :)

        Plus, living in Polish-speaking environment and not willing to trade
        it for foreign gold and glory, as I am, I see no need in nicknaming
        myself "<something> Pole", because for me being a Pole is a default,
        so to speak. Of course your perspective is different.

        Now the question/ request:

        My e-mail address, kutya harap, is a Hungarian expression (one of the
        first Hungarian words I've learnt) meaning literally "dog bites" and
        functionally "beware of the dog". This is what Hungarians write on
        the gates of their houses if they want to warn the possible intruders.

        I was wondering if you could perhaps provide similar expressions (ie.
        dog-warnings) from your languages, with a literal translation if
        possible.

        In Polish we write:
        First Uwaga ! (lit. attention, but used in signs in the manner
        of "beware" "watch out") and then "zl/y* pies" (lit. bad dog)

        I will be grateful for any contributions.

        Take care

        Piotr

        pS. *As we have only one word for both "bad" and "evil" I was tempted
        to give the "evil dog" translation...
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.