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RE: neutrinos : one can see that at 30 degrees phase the electrical charge is +2/3, and at 60 degrees is +1/3. These resemble the bquarks... You also get the right number of quarks (considering the spin too).

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  • Daniel Lapadatu by way of cyrano@aqua.o
    ... Something like that indeed. The mass of the neutrinos is known just as a domain in which it can take values. There are several sources to evaluate the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 19, 2001
      Ross wrote:

      > The mass issue for neutrinos is calculated via the loss of
      > energy from beta
      > type reactions, not from any actual interaction with the
      > particle that
      > could really measure it's mass.

      Something like that indeed. The mass of the neutrinos is known just as a
      domain in which it can take values. There are several sources to evaluate
      the
      upper limits of the neutrino mass. For instance, from cosmological
      considerations
      neutrinos cannot have a mass higher than 65 eV. Note that mass here is not
      measured based on inertia or gravity, but rather from the energy
      conservation and momentum conservation laws and their relativistic
      relationship. Therefore, what actually is measured is the square of the
      mass. That means when people say that muon neutrino is heavier than the
      electronic neutrino, one should consider this with caution, because all mass
      differences are also squared and the relationship may be actually the other
      way round.

      > neutrinos with 90 / 270 phase angle charge, we cannot use 0

      Let's clarify this too: 270 phase neutrino is what is called antineutrino.
      Or not? Logically, if you take electron and positron as being 180 degrees
      apart, it follows that neutrino 90 and neutrino 270 are the particle and
      antiparticle.

      > 0 I assign to be positive, and 180 is negative, so 90 and 270
      > are both neutral phases).

      What you say is equivalent with: draw a circle of radius 1 in the xOy plane.
      Start counting the phase from the point (1,0) (located on axis Ox),
      anticlockwise.
      Then at point (1,0) is the electron, at point (0,1) is the neutrino, at
      point (-1,0) is the positron and at point (0,-1) is the antineutrino. The
      axis Ox defines the electrical charge, while the axis Oy defines the
      neutrino-charge (or whatever name). The neutrinos have both zero electrical
      charge and the electrons have both zero neutrino-charge. That's at least how
      I pictured this.

      Then you can start wondering: what's at 30 degrees phase? At 60 degrees? and
      so on.
      With the assumptions from above, one can see that at 30 degrees phase the
      electrical charge is +2/3, and at 60 degrees is +1/3. These reasamble the
      quarks... You also get the right number of quarks (considering the spin
      too).

      I went through this sort of deduction, but sincerely I am not quite
      satisfied. It does not give new answers and some other things are turning
      out wrongly. I don't exclude a mistake on my side either.

      > be the cause of nuclear beta decay. Further, it could
      > reasonably be that
      > we are bathed in a sea of neutrinos that really are just like
      > electrons and

      Yes. That's what I believe too, but from different reasons.

      > The neutrino issue is far more complicated than others know,
      > and far from solved.

      Quite true. And it is a pity that efforts are not focussed on neutrinos.
      Thousands of people study the heavy quarks, when these have little if no
      impact at all in the going of the Universe. While with the neutrinos is a
      totally different story: they play a major role in cosmology.

      Cheers,
      Daniel
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