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Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

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  • Anant Dave
    Dear Mani, A good information indeed. I just wanted to know further what is the criterion for selection of an emulsifier? or how do we know the efficiency of
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2010
      Dear Mani,
      A good information indeed.
      I just wanted to know further what is the criterion for selection of an emulsifier? or how do we know the efficiency of an emulsifier? or how can we compare two emulsifiers?
      Regards,
      Anant

      --- On Mon, 1/3/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...> wrote:

      From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...>
      Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
      To: foodees@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Monday, 1 March, 2010, 6:13 AM

       
      Go to this website & search...... ......... ...your things...... .

      Regards,
      C.Manimaran.

      From: Anant Dave <swaraj177@yahoo. com>
      To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
      Sent: Mon, 1 March, 2010 3:52:48 AM
      Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

       
      Dear Mani,
      How are the emulsifiers classified?
      how do we know what emulsifiers to be used for which food application,
      Regards,
      Anant


      --- On Sat, 27/2/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in> wrote:

      From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in>
      Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
      To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
      Received: Saturday, 27 February, 2010, 7:53 PM

       

      Emulsifiers

      Mayonnaise contains oil and water. The emulsifier keeps these mixed and without it the oil and water separate.

      Roll over the picture to see mayonnaise without emulsifier.

      Emulsions in food are mixtures of oil and water. These normally do not mix and will separate if left without an emulsifier. Roll over the photograph of the mayonnaise to see the effects when the emulsifier is not added.

      The oil and water separate in mayonnaise without emulsifier.

      What are emulsions?

      There are two types of emulsions. An oil-in-water emulsion contains small droplets of oil that are dispersed in water. Alternatively, a water-in-oil emulsion has small droplets of water that are dispersed in an oil. Usually the water and oil will not mix and the emulsifier, or emulsifying agent, keeps the mixture stable and prevents the oil and water from separating into two layers.

      Emulsifiers in food

      Emulsifiers are among the most frequently used types of food additives. They are used for many reasons.

      Emulsifiers can help to make a food appealing. The example of the mayonnaise without the emulsifier shows how unappealing it would be if the oil and water separated before it was used. Emulsifiers have a big effect on the structure and texture of many foods. They are used to aid in the processing of foods and also to help maintain quality and freshness. In low fat spreads, emulsifiers can help to prevent the growth of moulds which would happen if the oil and fat separated. The table shows foods in which emulsifiers are most commonly used.

      Foods that Commonly Contain Emulsifiers
      BiscuitsToffeesBread
      Extruded snacksChewing gumMargarine / low fat spreads
      Breakfast cerealsFrozen dessertsCoffee whiteners
      CakesIce-creamTopping powders
      Desserts / moussesDried potatoPeanut butter
      Soft drinksChocolate coatingsCaramels
      Regards,
      C.Manimaran.

      From: stephen Raj <rajstephen26@ yahoo.com>
      To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
      Sent: Sat, 27 February, 2010 6:56:04 PM
      Subject: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

       
      Dear scientists
       
      i request you to kindly drop in info on the NEED FOR USING A EMULSIFIERS in different foods?
       
      thank you


      The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.


      The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.

       


      The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.
       
    • Sakthi Vijayakumar
      I believe its based on how hydrophilic or lipophilic the food substance is i.e. whether it is an oil in water or water in oil emulsion... HLB
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2010
        I believe its based on how hydrophilic or lipophilic the food substance is i.e. whether it is an oil in water or water in oil emulsion... HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) values serve to help the selection of emulsifiers. An emulsifier with lower HLB value of 3-6 is for an W/O emulsion while ones with higher values of 8-18 are for O/W emulsions.. for example: mono and diglycerides used in margarine as emulsifiers have an HLB value of around 3.5; they prevent fat crystallization in margarines.. emulsifiers used in bread (HLB - around 15) help in dough strengthening through water binding. Hydrophilic ones will have more hydroxyl groups that enable more water solubility.. lipophilic ones have long chain fatty acids.

        I hope this helps..

        Regards,

        On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 2:06 AM, Anant Dave <swaraj177@...> wrote:
         

        Dear Mani,
        A good information indeed.
        I just wanted to know further what is the criterion for selection of an emulsifier? or how do we know the efficiency of an emulsifier? or how can we compare two emulsifiers?
        Regards,
        Anant


        --- On Mon, 1/3/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...> wrote:

        From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...>
        Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
        To: foodees@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Monday, 1 March, 2010, 6:13 AM

         
        Go to this website & search...... ......... ...your things...... .

        Regards,
        C.Manimaran.

        From: Anant Dave <swaraj177@yahoo. com>
        To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
        Sent: Mon, 1 March, 2010 3:52:48 AM
        Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

         
        Dear Mani,
        How are the emulsifiers classified?
        how do we know what emulsifiers to be used for which food application,
        Regards,
        Anant


        --- On Sat, 27/2/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in> wrote:

        From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in>
        Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
        To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
        Received: Saturday, 27 February, 2010, 7:53 PM

         

        Emulsifiers

        Emulsions in food are mixtures of oil and water. These normally do not mix and will separate if left without an emulsifier. Roll over the photograph of the mayonnaise to see the effects when the emulsifier is not added.

        Mayonnaise contains oil and water. The emulsifier keeps these mixed and without it the oil and water separate.

        Roll over the picture to see mayonnaise without emulsifier.

        The oil and water separate in mayonnaise without emulsifier.

        What are emulsions?

        There are two types of emulsions. An oil-in-water emulsion contains small droplets of oil that are dispersed in water. Alternatively, a water-in-oil emulsion has small droplets of water that are dispersed in an oil. Usually the water and oil will not mix and the emulsifier, or emulsifying agent, keeps the mixture stable and prevents the oil and water from separating into two layers.

        Emulsifiers in food

        Emulsifiers are among the most frequently used types of food additives. They are used for many reasons.

        Emulsifiers can help to make a food appealing. The example of the mayonnaise without the emulsifier shows how unappealing it would be if the oil and water separated before it was used. Emulsifiers have a big effect on the structure and texture of many foods. They are used to aid in the processing of foods and also to help maintain quality and freshness. In low fat spreads, emulsifiers can help to prevent the growth of moulds which would happen if the oil and fat separated. The table shows foods in which emulsifiers are most commonly used.

        Foods that Commonly Contain Emulsifiers
        BiscuitsToffeesBread
        Extruded snacksChewing gumMargarine / low fat spreads
        Breakfast cerealsFrozen dessertsCoffee whiteners
        CakesIce-creamTopping powders
        Desserts / moussesDried potatoPeanut butter
        Soft drinksChocolate coatingsCaramels

        Regards,
        C.Manimaran.

        From: stephen Raj <rajstephen26@ yahoo.com>
        To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
        Sent: Sat, 27 February, 2010 6:56:04 PM
        Subject: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

         
        Dear scientists
         
        i request you to kindly drop in info on the NEED FOR USING A EMULSIFIERS in different foods?
         
        thank you


        The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.


        The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.

         


        The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.
         



        --
        Sakthi Vijayakumar | Graduate Research Assistant | Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition | Iowa State University | Ames, IA-50010 |
      • babu chinnasamy
        Hi , Just to add to Sakthi s message, Am emulsifier with *Low HLB* meaning more liphophilic ie, The emulsifier is more *stable in Oil*, hence it would be used
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2010
          Hi ,
          Just to add to Sakthi's message,

          Am emulsifier with Low HLB meaning more liphophilic ie, The emulsifier is more stable in Oil, hence it would be used to bind water in an oil emulsion!!

          High HLB value- means more hydrophilic (i.e) the emulsifier is more stable in Water, hence it can be used to bind oil in a water emulsion.

          Thanks,
          Babu Chinnasamy
          Graduate Student,
          Iowa State University, Ames.


          On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 10:55 AM, Sakthi Vijayakumar <shakthi.uv@...> wrote:
           

          I believe its based on how hydrophilic or lipophilic the food substance is i.e. whether it is an oil in water or water in oil emulsion... HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) values serve to help the selection of emulsifiers. An emulsifier with lower HLB value of 3-6 is for an W/O emulsion while ones with higher values of 8-18 are for O/W emulsions.. for example: mono and diglycerides used in margarine as emulsifiers have an HLB value of around 3.5; they prevent fat crystallization in margarines.. emulsifiers used in bread (HLB - around 15) help in dough strengthening through water binding. Hydrophilic ones will have more hydroxyl groups that enable more water solubility.. lipophilic ones have long chain fatty acids.


          I hope this helps..

          Regards,

          On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 2:06 AM, Anant Dave <swaraj177@...> wrote:
           

          Dear Mani,
          A good information indeed.
          I just wanted to know further what is the criterion for selection of an emulsifier? or how do we know the efficiency of an emulsifier? or how can we compare two emulsifiers?
          Regards,
          Anant


          --- On Mon, 1/3/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...> wrote:

          From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@...>
          Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
          To: foodees@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Monday, 1 March, 2010, 6:13 AM

           
          Go to this website & search...... ......... ...your things...... .

          Regards,
          C.Manimaran.

          From: Anant Dave <swaraj177@yahoo. com>
          To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
          Sent: Mon, 1 March, 2010 3:52:48 AM
          Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

           
          Dear Mani,
          How are the emulsifiers classified?
          how do we know what emulsifiers to be used for which food application,
          Regards,
          Anant


          --- On Sat, 27/2/10, manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in> wrote:

          From: manimaran mani <confectionerymaran@ yahoo.co. in>
          Subject: Re: [foodees] emulsifier doubt
          To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
          Received: Saturday, 27 February, 2010, 7:53 PM

           

          Emulsifiers

          Emulsions in food are mixtures of oil and water. These normally do not mix and will separate if left without an emulsifier. Roll over the photograph of the mayonnaise to see the effects when the emulsifier is not added.

          Mayonnaise contains oil and water. The emulsifier keeps these mixed and without it the oil and water separate.

          Roll over the picture to see mayonnaise without emulsifier.

          The oil and water separate in mayonnaise without emulsifier.

          What are emulsions?

          There are two types of emulsions. An oil-in-water emulsion contains small droplets of oil that are dispersed in water. Alternatively, a water-in-oil emulsion has small droplets of water that are dispersed in an oil. Usually the water and oil will not mix and the emulsifier, or emulsifying agent, keeps the mixture stable and prevents the oil and water from separating into two layers.

          Emulsifiers in food

          Emulsifiers are among the most frequently used types of food additives. They are used for many reasons.

          Emulsifiers can help to make a food appealing. The example of the mayonnaise without the emulsifier shows how unappealing it would be if the oil and water separated before it was used. Emulsifiers have a big effect on the structure and texture of many foods. They are used to aid in the processing of foods and also to help maintain quality and freshness. In low fat spreads, emulsifiers can help to prevent the growth of moulds which would happen if the oil and fat separated. The table shows foods in which emulsifiers are most commonly used.

          Foods that Commonly Contain Emulsifiers
          BiscuitsToffeesBread
          Extruded snacksChewing gumMargarine / low fat spreads
          Breakfast cerealsFrozen dessertsCoffee whiteners
          CakesIce-creamTopping powders
          Desserts / moussesDried potatoPeanut butter
          Soft drinksChocolate coatingsCaramels

          Regards,
          C.Manimaran.

          From: stephen Raj <rajstephen26@ yahoo.com>
          To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
          Sent: Sat, 27 February, 2010 6:56:04 PM
          Subject: [foodees] emulsifier doubt

           
          Dear scientists
           
          i request you to kindly drop in info on the NEED FOR USING A EMULSIFIERS in different foods?
           
          thank you


          The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.


          The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.

           


          The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.
           



          --
          Sakthi Vijayakumar | Graduate Research Assistant | Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition | Iowa State University | Ames, IA-50010 |

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