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relabeling of FPO licence

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  • tushar joshi
    Hi   If I am getting any fruit product manufactured by contract manufacturing - with declaration   Marketed by - My address Manufactured by - XYZ
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 1, 2010
      Hi
       
      If I am getting any fruit product manufactured by contract manufacturing - with declaration
       
      Marketed by - My address
      Manufactured by - XYZ organization (have FPO Licence)
       
      Does I need a relabeling licence from FPO - if XYZ in having single manufacturing location and it is the only contract manufacturing I am operating with ?

      Regards,
       
      Tushar Joshi
      +91 9930825187 (m)
       
      P   Please do not print this email unless it is absolutely necessary. Spread environmental awareness.


      --- On Mon, 1/2/10, ajay kumar <ajay_khort@...> wrote:

      From: ajay kumar <ajay_khort@...>
      Subject: [foodees] Indian food innovations
      To: foodees@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, 1 February, 2010, 10:14 AM

       
      Dear All

      Salute to Indian food innovations; read it;

      Kurkure, Pepsico’s Indian innovation in the salted snacks market, may go on its first overseas trip – soon. Encouraged by its blockbuster success in India, Pepsi is planning to give foreigners a taste of Kurkure, which has become a Rs 700 crore brand in its 10th year.
      The foods and beverage giant is in negotiations with Pepsico managements in other countries, especially those in West Asia, to introduce the product there. The vast expat community is the prime target since they have similar tastes. It’s not Kurkure alone, Pepsico is planning to do the same with Aliva, another snacks brand which has done exceedingly well in India.
      Vidur Vyas, executive vice president (marketing), Frito Lay India, wouldn’t comment on the overseas foray, but says Kurkure would look for a gradual progression as it has become one of India’s most loved snack food brands and created a new category of ‘tea time’ ‘snacks. ‘It’s become a lovable family brand, examining Indian traditions with a perspective that is new and different,” he says.
      Kurkure, according to Vyas, has been a brand of many firsts – from packaging to flavours keeping Indian tastes and preferences in mind. In 2009, for instance, Kurkure went regional with a vengeance with flavours like ‘Mumbai Chatpata’, ‘ Parar Tok Jhal’ and ‘South Special’, which are targeted at the western, eastern and southern parts of the country. On the anvil are Kurkure Funjabi, Kadai Masala, made with rajma (kidney bean) for the north Indian consumer.
      The positioning, analysts say, has been unique. For example, last month, Pepsico came out with a print campaign which told readers how Kurkure is made from what can be found in any Indian kitchen, underlining that the ingredients are as wholesome as what goes into home-made food. Kurkure now on will be less about flavours and more about ingredients.
      What it means in terms of branding is that Kurkure will have another differentiation from FritoLay's other brands (Lays, Aliva et al), apart from staving off competition from a growing tribe of roasted snacks, including Aliva, Parle Product's Monaco Smart Chips and Parle Agro's Hippo.
      Kurkure has also managed to snack its way even into the highly-lucrative festive season in India, with new tamper-proof packaging along with an online gifting option, where consumers can now send a gift pack of the product via the internet.
      Features such as these, say analysts, have helped the brand carve a special place for itself in the Indian snack food market, which would be hard to replicate not just by competitors but also by the company itself. “Kurkure is a classic example of exemplary product innovation and a good marketing strategy. The purely Indian outlook and taste has helped it make a mark on the minds of the consumer”, notes Purnendu Kumar, senior analyst. Technopak India.
      Pitching the product on the health platform has also helped Kurkure. While the claims are not direct, the company's statement that Kurkure has zero per cent trans fats and no cholesterol and that it's made from corn, rice and gram flour, have helped the product give consumers a ‘guilt free eating’ experience, according to analysts. Its Snack Smart initiative has cut out trans-fat from its products and changed the oil used for Kurkure to rice bran which cuts saturated fat by 40 per cent. An attempt to control portions consumed by users has seen it launch Rs-3 packs. This has pushed sales in the lower-tier towns.
      These and the first-mover advantage are reasons why Kurkure enjoys a virtual monopoly in its category. While ITC tried to compete with 'Tedhe Medhe', the impact has not been encouarging so far. While ITC did not respond to queries, Anand Ramanathan, sector analyst from KPMG, says “ITC has a great distribution network. But 'Tedhe Medhe’ is not doing well because ITC couldn't add anything different than what Frito-Lay's Kurkure alreday had.
      However, new products like Hippo and a few local brands are trying to gradually make their presence felt in the market and ramping up market share



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    • Keyur..
      Dear Jotu, I think you don t need relabelling licence. Its in case of MMPO that both manufacturer and packing company needs licences. Suggestions and
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2010
        Dear Jotu,

        I think you don't need relabelling licence. Its in case of MMPO that both manufacturer and packing company needs licences.

        Suggestions and corrections are most welcome.

        Warm regards

        Keyur

        Sent from my BlackBerry® on Reliance Mobile, India's No. 1 Network. Go for it!


        From: tushar joshi <tushar41280@...>
        Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 14:08:15 +0530 (IST)
        To: <foodees@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [foodees] relabeling of FPO licence

         

        Hi
         
        If I am getting any fruit product manufactured by contract manufacturing - with declaration
         
        Marketed by - My address
        Manufactured by - XYZ organization (have FPO Licence)
         
        Does I need a relabeling licence from FPO - if XYZ in having single manufacturing location and it is the only contract manufacturing I am operating with ?

        Regards,
         
        Tushar Joshi
        +91 9930825187 (m)
         
        P   Please do not print this email unless it is absolutely necessary. Spread environmental awareness.


        --- On Mon, 1/2/10, ajay kumar <ajay_khort@yahoo. com> wrote:

        From: ajay kumar <ajay_khort@yahoo. com>
        Subject: [foodees] Indian food innovations
        To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
        Date: Monday, 1 February, 2010, 10:14 AM

         
        Dear All

        Salute to Indian food innovations; read it;

        Kurkure, Pepsico’s Indian innovation in the salted snacks market, may go on its first overseas trip – soon. Encouraged by its blockbuster success in India, Pepsi is planning to give foreigners a taste of Kurkure, which has become a Rs 700 crore brand in its 10th year.
        The foods and beverage giant is in negotiations with Pepsico managements in other countries, especially those in West Asia, to introduce the product there. The vast expat community is the prime target since they have similar tastes. It’s not Kurkure alone, Pepsico is planning to do the same with Aliva, another snacks brand which has done exceedingly well in India.
        Vidur Vyas, executive vice president (marketing), Frito Lay India, wouldn’t comment on the overseas foray, but says Kurkure would look for a gradual progression as it has become one of India’s most loved snack food brands and created a new category of ‘tea time’ ‘snacks. ‘It’s become a lovable family brand, examining Indian traditions with a perspective that is new and different,” he says.
        Kurkure, according to Vyas, has been a brand of many firsts – from packaging to flavours keeping Indian tastes and preferences in mind. In 2009, for instance, Kurkure went regional with a vengeance with flavours like ‘Mumbai Chatpata’, ‘ Parar Tok Jhal’ and ‘South Special’, which are targeted at the western, eastern and southern parts of the country. On the anvil are Kurkure Funjabi, Kadai Masala, made with rajma (kidney bean) for the north Indian consumer.
        The positioning, analysts say, has been unique. For example, last month, Pepsico came out with a print campaign which told readers how Kurkure is made from what can be found in any Indian kitchen, underlining that the ingredients are as wholesome as what goes into home-made food. Kurkure now on will be less about flavours and more about ingredients.
        What it means in terms of branding is that Kurkure will have another differentiation from FritoLay's other brands (Lays, Aliva et al), apart from staving off competition from a growing tribe of roasted snacks, including Aliva, Parle Product's Monaco Smart Chips and Parle Agro's Hippo.
        Kurkure has also managed to snack its way even into the highly-lucrative festive season in India, with new tamper-proof packaging along with an online gifting option, where consumers can now send a gift pack of the product via the internet.
        Features such as these, say analysts, have helped the brand carve a special place for itself in the Indian snack food market, which would be hard to replicate not just by competitors but also by the company itself. “Kurkure is a classic example of exemplary product innovation and a good marketing strategy. The purely Indian outlook and taste has helped it make a mark on the minds of the consumer”, notes Purnendu Kumar, senior analyst. Technopak India.
        Pitching the product on the health platform has also helped Kurkure. While the claims are not direct, the company's statement that Kurkure has zero per cent trans fats and no cholesterol and that it's made from corn, rice and gram flour, have helped the product give consumers a ‘guilt free eating’ experience, according to analysts. Its Snack Smart initiative has cut out trans-fat from its products and changed the oil used for Kurkure to rice bran which cuts saturated fat by 40 per cent. An attempt to control portions consumed by users has seen it launch Rs-3 packs. This has pushed sales in the lower-tier towns.
        These and the first-mover advantage are reasons why Kurkure enjoys a virtual monopoly in its category. While ITC tried to compete with 'Tedhe Medhe', the impact has not been encouarging so far. While ITC did not respond to queries, Anand Ramanathan, sector analyst from KPMG, says “ITC has a great distribution network. But 'Tedhe Medhe’ is not doing well because ITC couldn't add anything different than what Frito-Lay's Kurkure alreday had.
        However, new products like Hippo and a few local brands are trying to gradually make their presence felt in the market and ramping up market share



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      • bikram bhadauria
        JOB SEARCH RESULTS Create New Saved Search | Manage Saved Search Details My Saved Search: Food Technologist - Production(Daily Email) View All Matching Jobs
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2010
          JOB SEARCH RESULTS
          Create New Saved Search | Manage Saved Search Details
          My Saved Search:
          Food Technologist - Production
          (Daily Email)
          View All Matching Jobs
          Job TitleCompany/Location
          IS Machine Operators, Production, Maintenance, Quality Control - Glass ManufacturingLeone Industries Inc
          NJ-Bridgeton-08302
          Apply Now
          PURCH. MGR, ASST BUYER, REC/MATERIAL HANDLER, QUALITY CONTROL MGR, OPER. MGR, PRODUCTION LEADSPELICAN BAY LTD
          Dunedin-34698
          Apply Now
          Kitchen Production Supervisor, Cooks, Dietary aides and Unit ClerkCompany Confidential
          MN-ROBBINSDALE-55422
          Apply Now
          MRI Technologist & Radiologic TechnologistMedical University Of Sc
          Charleston-29425
          Apply Now
          PRODUCTION SUPERVISORCoty
          Keeseville-12944
          Apply Now
          Diagnostic Radiologic TechnologistCompany Confidential
          Laurel Park-26301
          Apply Now
          Assistant Food Service Director - Arlington, VAARAMARK SCM, Inc
          VA-Arlington-22201
          Apply Now
          Sr Engineer, High Speed Food PackagingLaguna Source
          IN-Indianapolis-46201
          Apply Now
          Java Developer/Production SupportTAC Worldwide Companies
          CA-San Francisco
          Apply Now
          Production Support - Info Sys EngineerCharles Schwab & Co.
          TX-Austin-78759
          Apply Now


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        • Renuka.P
          Dear Keyur,   No. Not only in case of MMPO, its also for FPO, the relabeller should posses relabeller license. I was working previously in a fruit processing
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 2, 2010
            Dear Keyur,
             
            No. Not only in case of MMPO, its also for FPO, the relabeller should posses relabeller license. I was working previously in a fruit processing unit, where they give contract manufacturing to one unit who are having FPO license for manufacturing & the packer is having relabeller license.

            --- On Mon, 2/1/10, Keyur.. <reachkeyur@...> wrote:

            From: Keyur.. <reachkeyur@...>
            Subject: Re: [foodees] relabeling of FPO licence
            To: foodees@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 1, 2010, 3:47 PM

             
            Dear Jotu,

            I think you don't need relabelling licence. Its in case of MMPO that both manufacturer and packing company needs licences.

            Suggestions and corrections are most welcome.

            Warm regards

            Keyur
            Sent from my BlackBerry® on Reliance Mobile, India's No. 1 Network. Go for it!

            From: tushar joshi <tushar41280@ yahoo.co. in>
            Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 14:08:15 +0530 (IST)
            To: <foodees@yahoogroups .com>
            Subject: [foodees] relabeling of FPO licence

             
            Hi
             
            If I am getting any fruit product manufactured by contract manufacturing - with declaration
             
            Marketed by - My address
            Manufactured by - XYZ organization (have FPO Licence)
             
            Does I need a relabeling licence from FPO - if XYZ in having single manufacturing location and it is the only contract manufacturing I am operating with ?

            Regards,
             
            Tushar Joshi
            +91 9930825187 (m)
             
            P   Please do not print this email unless it is absolutely necessary. Spread environmental awareness.


            --- On Mon, 1/2/10, ajay kumar <ajay_khort@yahoo. com> wrote:

            From: ajay kumar <ajay_khort@yahoo. com>
            Subject: [foodees] Indian food innovations
            To: foodees@yahoogroups .com
            Date: Monday, 1 February, 2010, 10:14 AM

             
            Dear All

            Salute to Indian food innovations; read it;

            Kurkure, Pepsico’s Indian innovation in the salted snacks market, may go on its first overseas trip – soon. Encouraged by its blockbuster success in India, Pepsi is planning to give foreigners a taste of Kurkure, which has become a Rs 700 crore brand in its 10th year.
            The foods and beverage giant is in negotiations with Pepsico managements in other countries, especially those in West Asia, to introduce the product there. The vast expat community is the prime target since they have similar tastes. It’s not Kurkure alone, Pepsico is planning to do the same with Aliva, another snacks brand which has done exceedingly well in India.
            Vidur Vyas, executive vice president (marketing), Frito Lay India, wouldn’t comment on the overseas foray, but says Kurkure would look for a gradual progression as it has become one of India’s most loved snack food brands and created a new category of ‘tea time’ ‘snacks. ‘It’s become a lovable family brand, examining Indian traditions with a perspective that is new and different,” he says.
            Kurkure, according to Vyas, has been a brand of many firsts – from packaging to flavours keeping Indian tastes and preferences in mind. In 2009, for instance, Kurkure went regional with a vengeance with flavours like ‘Mumbai Chatpata’, ‘ Parar Tok Jhal’ and ‘South Special’, which are targeted at the western, eastern and southern parts of the country. On the anvil are Kurkure Funjabi, Kadai Masala, made with rajma (kidney bean) for the north Indian consumer.
            The positioning, analysts say, has been unique. For example, last month, Pepsico came out with a print campaign which told readers how Kurkure is made from what can be found in any Indian kitchen, underlining that the ingredients are as wholesome as what goes into home-made food. Kurkure now on will be less about flavours and more about ingredients.
            What it means in terms of branding is that Kurkure will have another differentiation from FritoLay's other brands (Lays, Aliva et al), apart from staving off competition from a growing tribe of roasted snacks, including Aliva, Parle Product's Monaco Smart Chips and Parle Agro's Hippo.
            Kurkure has also managed to snack its way even into the highly-lucrative festive season in India, with new tamper-proof packaging along with an online gifting option, where consumers can now send a gift pack of the product via the internet.
            Features such as these, say analysts, have helped the brand carve a special place for itself in the Indian snack food market, which would be hard to replicate not just by competitors but also by the company itself. “Kurkure is a classic example of exemplary product innovation and a good marketing strategy. The purely Indian outlook and taste has helped it make a mark on the minds of the consumer”, notes Purnendu Kumar, senior analyst. Technopak India.
            Pitching the product on the health platform has also helped Kurkure. While the claims are not direct, the company's statement that Kurkure has zero per cent trans fats and no cholesterol and that it's made from corn, rice and gram flour, have helped the product give consumers a ‘guilt free eating’ experience, according to analysts. Its Snack Smart initiative has cut out trans-fat from its products and changed the oil used for Kurkure to rice bran which cuts saturated fat by 40 per cent. An attempt to control portions consumed by users has seen it launch Rs-3 packs. This has pushed sales in the lower-tier towns.
            These and the first-mover advantage are reasons why Kurkure enjoys a virtual monopoly in its category. While ITC tried to compete with 'Tedhe Medhe', the impact has not been encouarging so far. While ITC did not respond to queries, Anand Ramanathan, sector analyst from KPMG, says “ITC has a great distribution network. But 'Tedhe Medhe’ is not doing well because ITC couldn't add anything different than what Frito-Lay's Kurkure alreday had.
            However, new products like Hippo and a few local brands are trying to gradually make their presence felt in the market and ramping up market share



            Your Mail works best with the New Yahoo Optimized IE8. Get it NOW!.

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