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  • David Parke
    The please interjection is highly varied among the source languages: EN please NL alstublieft/alsjeblieft DE bitte DA/NO vær så god SV varsågod IL per
    Message 1 of 22 , Aug 21 7:02 PM
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      The "please" interjection is highly varied among the source languages:
      EN please
      NL alstublieft/alsjeblieft
      DE bitte
      DA/NO vær så god
      SV varsågod
      IL per favor

      What do you think the FS word should be for this? Is such a thing even
      necessary for FS? If we do without it, it will mean even polite
      requests will seem like orders or demands, but the converse of this,
      is that orders or demands will have the sting taken out of them, since
      they could also be considered polite.

      There is definitely enough agreement among the source languages for a
      "thanks" word. Something like "tanke" or "tank di" or "tank jiuw"

      If we do have a a "please" word, I think something based on the
      Scandinavian "varsågod" model would be my choice. So an FS equivalent,
      something like "wes so gôd (tô)". I'm in favour of this construction,
      if only because of the source language samples, it is the most
      self-explanatory.

      So for "Please give me wallet"

      "Wes so gôd tô geve mi jiur burs"

      For "Give me your wallet!"
      "Gev mi dîn burs!"

      How does everbody feel about that?
    • Hugo Cesar
      Let s analyse which is the literal meaning of each of these sentences/words, besides the please meaning ;-)! Please in English means you are being nice to
      Message 2 of 22 , Aug 21 7:52 PM
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        Let's analyse which is the literal meaning of each of these sentences/words, besides the "please" meaning ;-)!

        Please in English means you are being nice to someone: you're pleasing someone.
        In Dutch, alsjeblieft and alstublieft I found no meaning, but I think it should mean something like to be lovely (lief). But I also found in a English <-> Dutch online dictionary: "wees zo goed", which means "be so good".
        German bitte is from the verb bitten, which means to ask for something, to beg for something.
        in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish all of them mean "Be so good".

        So like the Scandy languages use "be so good" as their "please", so there is a Dutch "be so good" possibility: wees zo goed, and also the verb "to please" means to make someone happy, or even be nice to someone, so something like: "please me" could be translated as: "be so good to me" or "be so nice to me".
        So, in my opinion, "be so good" is the best option, or even changing the adjective could also be good, like: "be so nice" or any other option.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: David Parke
        To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, August 21, 2006 11:02 PM
        Subject: [folkspraak] Please


        The "please" interjection is highly varied among the source languages:
        EN please
        NL alstublieft/alsjeblieft
        DE bitte
        DA/NO vær så god
        SV varsågod
        IL per favor

        What do you think the FS word should be for this? Is such a thing even
        necessary for FS? If we do without it, it will mean even polite
        requests will seem like orders or demands, but the converse of this,
        is that orders or demands will have the sting taken out of them, since
        they could also be considered polite.

        There is definitely enough agreement among the source languages for a
        "thanks" word. Something like "tanke" or "tank di" or "tank jiuw"

        If we do have a a "please" word, I think something based on the
        Scandinavian "varsågod" model would be my choice. So an FS equivalent,
        something like "wes so gôd (tô)". I'm in favour of this construction,
        if only because of the source language samples, it is the most
        self-explanatory.

        So for "Please give me wallet"

        "Wes so gôd tô geve mi jiur burs"

        For "Give me your wallet!"
        "Gev mi dîn burs!"

        How does everbody feel about that?





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David Parke
        Yes on the Websters online dictionary, http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/, it gives wees zo goed as one possible translation of please , as well as
        Message 3 of 22 , Aug 21 8:53 PM
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          Yes on the Websters online dictionary,
          http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/, it gives "wees zo goed" as
          one possible translation of "please", as well as "alstublieft"
          The "u" and "je" in "alstublieft" and "alsjeblieft" are 2nd person
          pronouns in Dutch, the formal and the familiar.

          In English you can also say phrases such as "would you be so kind as
          to...", as a polite way of making a request.
          So you (Hugo) seem to be in agreement with me, "wes so gôd..." is
          about as good a phrase as we will find.





          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Hugo Cesar" <hcesarcastro@...> wrote:
          >
          > Let's analyse which is the literal meaning of each of these
          sentences/words, besides the "please" meaning ;-)!
          >
          > Please in English means you are being nice to someone: you're
          pleasing someone.
          > In Dutch, alsjeblieft and alstublieft I found no meaning, but I
          think it should mean something like to be lovely (lief). But I also
          found in a English <-> Dutch online dictionary: "wees zo goed", which
          means "be so good".
          > German bitte is from the verb bitten, which means to ask for
          something, to beg for something.
          > in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish all of them mean "Be so good".
          >
          > So like the Scandy languages use "be so good" as their "please", so
          there is a Dutch "be so good" possibility: wees zo goed, and also the
          verb "to please" means to make someone happy, or even be nice to
          someone, so something like: "please me" could be translated as: "be so
          good to me" or "be so nice to me".
          > So, in my opinion, "be so good" is the best option, or even changing
          the adjective could also be good, like: "be so nice" or any other option.
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: David Parke
          > To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, August 21, 2006 11:02 PM
          > Subject: [folkspraak] Please
          >
          >
          > The "please" interjection is highly varied among the source languages:
          > EN please
          > NL alstublieft/alsjeblieft
          > DE bitte
          > DA/NO vær så god
          > SV varsågod
          > IL per favor
          >
          > What do you think the FS word should be for this? Is such a thing even
          > necessary for FS? If we do without it, it will mean even polite
          > requests will seem like orders or demands, but the converse of this,
          > is that orders or demands will have the sting taken out of them, since
          > they could also be considered polite.
          >
          > There is definitely enough agreement among the source languages for a
          > "thanks" word. Something like "tanke" or "tank di" or "tank jiuw"
          >
          > If we do have a a "please" word, I think something based on the
          > Scandinavian "varsågod" model would be my choice. So an FS equivalent,
          > something like "wes so gôd (tô)". I'm in favour of this construction,
          > if only because of the source language samples, it is the most
          > self-explanatory.
          >
          > So for "Please give me wallet"
          >
          > "Wes so gôd tô geve mi jiur burs"
          >
          > For "Give me your wallet!"
          > "Gev mi dîn burs!"
          >
          > How does everbody feel about that?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Hugo Cesar
          Now I understand the meaning of those words for please in dutch: Both mean: as you keep , als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of indicative present from
          Message 4 of 22 , Aug 22 2:38 AM
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            Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
            Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the same origin of the german verb bleiben).


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: David Parke
            To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, August 22, 2006 12:53 AM
            Subject: [folkspraak] Re: Please


            Yes on the Websters online dictionary,
            http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/, it gives "wees zo goed" as
            one possible translation of "please", as well as "alstublieft"
            The "u" and "je" in "alstublieft" and "alsjeblieft" are 2nd person
            pronouns in Dutch, the formal and the familiar.

            In English you can also say phrases such as "would you be so kind as
            to...", as a polite way of making a request.
            So you (Hugo) seem to be in agreement with me, "wes so gôd..." is
            about as good a phrase as we will find.

            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Hugo Cesar" <hcesarcastro@...> wrote:
            >
            > Let's analyse which is the literal meaning of each of these
            sentences/words, besides the "please" meaning ;-)!
            >
            > Please in English means you are being nice to someone: you're
            pleasing someone.
            > In Dutch, alsjeblieft and alstublieft I found no meaning, but I
            think it should mean something like to be lovely (lief). But I also
            found in a English <-> Dutch online dictionary: "wees zo goed", which
            means "be so good".
            > German bitte is from the verb bitten, which means to ask for
            something, to beg for something.
            > in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish all of them mean "Be so good".
            >
            > So like the Scandy languages use "be so good" as their "please", so
            there is a Dutch "be so good" possibility: wees zo goed, and also the
            verb "to please" means to make someone happy, or even be nice to
            someone, so something like: "please me" could be translated as: "be so
            good to me" or "be so nice to me".
            > So, in my opinion, "be so good" is the best option, or even changing
            the adjective could also be good, like: "be so nice" or any other option.
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: David Parke
            > To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, August 21, 2006 11:02 PM
            > Subject: [folkspraak] Please
            >
            >
            > The "please" interjection is highly varied among the source languages:
            > EN please
            > NL alstublieft/alsjeblieft
            > DE bitte
            > DA/NO vær så god
            > SV varsågod
            > IL per favor
            >
            > What do you think the FS word should be for this? Is such a thing even
            > necessary for FS? If we do without it, it will mean even polite
            > requests will seem like orders or demands, but the converse of this,
            > is that orders or demands will have the sting taken out of them, since
            > they could also be considered polite.
            >
            > There is definitely enough agreement among the source languages for a
            > "thanks" word. Something like "tanke" or "tank di" or "tank jiuw"
            >
            > If we do have a a "please" word, I think something based on the
            > Scandinavian "varsågod" model would be my choice. So an FS equivalent,
            > something like "wes so gôd (tô)". I'm in favour of this construction,
            > if only because of the source language samples, it is the most
            > self-explanatory.
            >
            > So for "Please give me wallet"
            >
            > "Wes so gôd tô geve mi jiur burs"
            >
            > For "Give me your wallet!"
            > "Gev mi dîn burs!"
            >
            > How does everbody feel about that?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jan-Willem Benjamins
            No, Alstublieft is a contraction of als het u belieft (if it pleases you) Jan-Willem ... ___________________________________________________________ Inbox
            Message 5 of 22 , Aug 22 3:12 AM
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              No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it pleases
              you)

              Jan-Willem

              --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@...> wrote:

              > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
              > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of
              > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the same
              > origin of the german verb bleiben).




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            • David Parke
              Hi JW, what does keil mean in Dutch? I am looking for a word for wedge and something related to NL keil, DE Keil, DA/NO kile, SV kil seems to be the best
              Message 6 of 22 , Aug 22 3:39 AM
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                Hi JW, what does "keil" mean in Dutch? I am looking for a word for
                "wedge" and something related to NL keil, DE Keil, DA/NO kile, SV kil
                seems to be the best choice. My dictionaries are a bit vague about
                whether this word can mean "wedge".

                Jan-Willem Benjamins wrote:

                > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it pleases
                > you)
                >
                > Jan-Willem
                >
                > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@...
                > <mailto:hcesarcastro%40gmail.com>> wrote:
                >
                > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
                > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of
                > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the same
                > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________________
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                >
                >
                >
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              • Jan-Willem Benjamins
                ... I checked two dictionaries, and none of them lists keil in this meaning. In fact, on its own the word means apparently (though I never encountered it in
                Message 7 of 22 , Aug 22 3:57 AM
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                  --- David Parke <parked@...> wrote:

                  > Hi JW, what does "keil" mean in Dutch? I am looking for a word for
                  > "wedge" and something related to NL keil, DE Keil, DA/NO kile, SV kil
                  >
                  > seems to be the best choice. My dictionaries are a bit vague about
                  > whether this word can mean "wedge".

                  I checked two dictionaries, and none of them lists "keil" in this
                  meaning. In fact, on its own the word means apparently (though I never
                  encountered it in real life) "a shot of genever"

                  I also saw a reference to "keilbout" which is apparently a kind of bolt
                  which is kept in place by a wedge. But that doesn't make a strong case
                  for there being a word "keil" meaning "wedge". "Wig" is the only word
                  that I know with this meaning. But maybe some dutch dialects use
                  "keil".

                  Jan-Willem




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                • David Parke
                  The only evidence that I could find was in my Interlingua-Nederlandese dictionary cuneo sub 1 wig, keg, keil, wigvormig stuk 2 muntstempel Also Interglot.com
                  Message 8 of 22 , Aug 22 4:06 AM
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                    The only evidence that I could find was in my Interlingua-Nederlandese
                    dictionary

                    cuneo

                    sub
                    1 wig, keg, keil, wigvormig stuk
                    2 muntstempel

                    Also Interglot.com translates NL keil as
                    wedge
                    key
                    clothes pin
                    quoin
                    peg
                    clothes-peg
                    cleat

                    Normally interglot.com is relatively accurate with regard to Dutch,
                    because it is a dutch creation.

                    But my Dutch-English Babylon dictionary gives

                    n. nip, sip, dram, small amount of liquor


                    But it must be quite a rare word, if you have not encountered it before.

                    Jan-Willem Benjamins wrote:

                    >
                    > --- David Parke <parked@... <mailto:parked%40woosh.co.nz>> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Hi JW, what does "keil" mean in Dutch? I am looking for a word for
                    > > "wedge" and something related to NL keil, DE Keil, DA/NO kile, SV kil
                    > >
                    > > seems to be the best choice. My dictionaries are a bit vague about
                    > > whether this word can mean "wedge".
                    >
                    > I checked two dictionaries, and none of them lists "keil" in this
                    > meaning. In fact, on its own the word means apparently (though I never
                    > encountered it in real life) "a shot of genever"
                    >
                    > I also saw a reference to "keilbout" which is apparently a kind of bolt
                    > which is kept in place by a wedge. But that doesn't make a strong case
                    > for there being a word "keil" meaning "wedge". "Wig" is the only word
                    > that I know with this meaning. But maybe some dutch dialects use
                    > "keil".
                    >
                    > Jan-Willem
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________________
                    > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB storage with
                    > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                    > <http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html>
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    >
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                    >
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                  • stefichjo
                    Cf. German: Wenn es euch beliebt Cf. French: S il vous plait So, belieben and bleiben are obviously two different words. The former is related to EN
                    Message 9 of 22 , Aug 22 7:02 AM
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                      Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                      Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"

                      So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different words. The
                      former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related to EN
                      "leave", as far as I remember.

                      I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".

                      The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                      "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I

                      Bye,
                      Stephan

                      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                      <benjaminsjw@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it pleases
                      > you)
                      >
                      > Jan-Willem
                      >
                      > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
                      > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of
                      > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the same
                      > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ___________________________________________________________
                      > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB storage with
                      All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                      >
                    • David Parke
                      Behage would make a good verb for to please . cf NL behagen, DE behagen, SV behaga. I m not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is represented in
                      Message 10 of 22 , Aug 22 2:14 PM
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                        "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL behagen, DE
                        behagen, SV behaga.
                        I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is represented in
                        "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"

                        So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                        "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off the tongue,
                        don't you think?

                        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                        > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                        >
                        > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different words. The
                        > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related to EN
                        > "leave", as far as I remember.
                        >
                        > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                        >
                        > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                        > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                        >
                        > Bye,
                        > Stephan
                        >
                        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                        > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it pleases
                        > > you)
                        > >
                        > > Jan-Willem
                        > >
                        > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
                        > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of
                        > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the same
                        > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ___________________________________________________________
                        > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB storage with
                        > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                        > >
                        >
                      • stefichjo
                        behagen , yes, it s only used in old-sounding expressions (we love to use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely. But Lennon s idea was to use
                        Message 11 of 22 , Aug 22 11:40 PM
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                          "behagen", yes, it's only used in old-sounding expressions (we love to
                          use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely. But Lennon's
                          idea was to use "please" in its two meanings in one sentence. Keeping
                          that in mind, I said "wes so god at wese so god (to mi)". The Beatles
                          wouldn't have made a number one hit with that line, though, I guess.

                          Bye,
                          Stephan

                          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL behagen, DE
                          > behagen, SV behaga.
                          > I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is represented in
                          > "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"
                          >
                          > So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                          > "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off the tongue,
                          > don't you think?
                          >
                          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                          > > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                          > >
                          > > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different words. The
                          > > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related to EN
                          > > "leave", as far as I remember.
                          > >
                          > > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                          > >
                          > > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                          > > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                          > >
                          > > Bye,
                          > > Stephan
                          > >
                          > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                          > > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it
                          pleases
                          > > > you)
                          > > >
                          > > > Jan-Willem
                          > > >
                          > > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in dutch:
                          > > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person singular of
                          > > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the
                          same
                          > > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > ___________________________________________________________
                          > > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB storage with
                          > > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • David Parke
                          Ingmar Roerdinkholder, who was part of this group once (or twice) made ... Middelfolksprâk. ... Dutch gaarne (formal, normal = graag ) ... I think gerne
                          Message 12 of 22 , Aug 23 3:43 PM
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                            Ingmar Roerdinkholder, who was part of this group once (or twice) made
                            this suggestion:

                            >"Gerne" is the word I used tot translate "please" in Middelsprake cq
                            Middelfolksprâk.
                            >
                            >Mag ig have de salt, gerne? can I have the salt, please?
                            >Kan du sege mi wat is dat, gerne? could you tell me what this is, please?
                            >
                            >Equivalents of "gerne" are German, Scandinavian and Low Saxon gerne and
                            Dutch gaarne (formal, normal = "graag")
                            >
                            >
                            >Groeten
                            >Ingmar

                            I think "gerne" would be good to mean "like to..." like it does in
                            german.

                            DE "Ich lese gern Bücher" = I like to read books/I like reading books

                            I myself am not so sure about using it as a word for "please"

                            "Gerne" might make a good word for "you're welcome" or "my pleasure"
                            or "no problem".

                            "Kann du wes-so-gôd sege mi wat is dis?" (Can you please tell me what
                            this is?)
                            "Dat is en appeltorte" (That is an apple pie)
                            "Tank di" (Thanks)
                            "Gerne" (You're welcome)





                            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > "behagen", yes, it's only used in old-sounding expressions (we love to
                            > use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely. But Lennon's
                            > idea was to use "please" in its two meanings in one sentence. Keeping
                            > that in mind, I said "wes so god at wese so god (to mi)". The Beatles
                            > wouldn't have made a number one hit with that line, though, I guess.
                            >
                            > Bye,
                            > Stephan
                            >
                            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL behagen, DE
                            > > behagen, SV behaga.
                            > > I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is represented in
                            > > "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"
                            > >
                            > > So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                            > > "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off the tongue,
                            > > don't you think?
                            > >
                            > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                            > > > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                            > > >
                            > > > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different words. The
                            > > > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related to EN
                            > > > "leave", as far as I remember.
                            > > >
                            > > > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                            > > >
                            > > > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                            > > > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                            > > >
                            > > > Bye,
                            > > > Stephan
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                            > > > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft" (if it
                            > pleases
                            > > > > you)
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Jan-Willem
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please" in
                            dutch:
                            > > > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person
                            singular of
                            > > > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think has the
                            > same
                            > > > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > ___________________________________________________________
                            > > > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB
                            storage with
                            > > > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • stefichjo
                            Cf. EN yearn . gern: you re welcome, with pleasure tank di: thank you wes-so-god / wes so god at: please In German there are both gern and gerne . I prefer
                            Message 13 of 22 , Aug 24 2:28 AM
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                              Cf. EN "yearn".

                              gern: you're welcome, with pleasure
                              tank di: thank you
                              wes-so-god / wes so god at: please

                              In German there are both "gern" and "gerne". I prefer FS words
                              without arbitrary endings, that's why I'd chose "gern".

                              Bye,
                              Stephan

                              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Ingmar Roerdinkholder, who was part of this group once (or twice)
                              made
                              > this suggestion:
                              >
                              > >"Gerne" is the word I used tot translate "please" in Middelsprake
                              cq
                              > Middelfolksprâk.
                              > >
                              > >Mag ig have de salt, gerne? can I have the salt, please?
                              > >Kan du sege mi wat is dat, gerne? could you tell me what this is,
                              please?
                              > >
                              > >Equivalents of "gerne" are German, Scandinavian and Low Saxon
                              gerne and
                              > Dutch gaarne (formal, normal = "graag")
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >Groeten
                              > >Ingmar
                              >
                              > I think "gerne" would be good to mean "like to..." like it does in
                              > german.
                              >
                              > DE "Ich lese gern Bücher" = I like to read books/I like reading
                              books
                              >
                              > I myself am not so sure about using it as a word for "please"
                              >
                              > "Gerne" might make a good word for "you're welcome" or "my
                              pleasure"
                              > or "no problem".
                              >
                              > "Kann du wes-so-gôd sege mi wat is dis?" (Can you please tell me
                              what
                              > this is?)
                              > "Dat is en appeltorte" (That is an apple pie)
                              > "Tank di" (Thanks)
                              > "Gerne" (You're welcome)
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > "behagen", yes, it's only used in old-sounding expressions (we
                              love to
                              > > use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely. But
                              Lennon's
                              > > idea was to use "please" in its two meanings in one sentence.
                              Keeping
                              > > that in mind, I said "wes so god at wese so god (to mi)". The
                              Beatles
                              > > wouldn't have made a number one hit with that line, though, I
                              guess.
                              > >
                              > > Bye,
                              > > Stephan
                              > >
                              > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL
                              behagen, DE
                              > > > behagen, SV behaga.
                              > > > I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is
                              represented in
                              > > > "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"
                              > > >
                              > > > So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                              > > > "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off the
                              tongue,
                              > > > don't you think?
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                              > > > > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                              > > > >
                              > > > > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different
                              words. The
                              > > > > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related
                              to EN
                              > > > > "leave", as far as I remember.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                              > > > >
                              > > > > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                              > > > > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Bye,
                              > > > > Stephan
                              > > > >
                              > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                              > > > > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft"
                              (if it
                              > > pleases
                              > > > > > you)
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > Jan-Willem
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please"
                              in
                              > dutch:
                              > > > > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person
                              > singular of
                              > > > > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think
                              has the
                              > > same
                              > > > > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              ___________________________________________________________
                              > > > > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB
                              > storage with
                              > > > > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                              > > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • David Parke
                              I ve never understood the difference between gern and gerne in German myself. EN yearn is also cognate to begehren
                              Message 14 of 22 , Aug 24 3:25 AM
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                                I've never understood the difference between "gern" and "gerne" in
                                German myself.
                                EN yearn is also cognate to "begehren"


                                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Cf. EN "yearn".
                                >
                                > gern: you're welcome, with pleasure
                                > tank di: thank you
                                > wes-so-god / wes so god at: please
                                >
                                > In German there are both "gern" and "gerne". I prefer FS words
                                > without arbitrary endings, that's why I'd chose "gern".
                                >
                                > Bye,
                                > Stephan
                                >
                                > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Ingmar Roerdinkholder, who was part of this group once (or twice)
                                > made
                                > > this suggestion:
                                > >
                                > > >"Gerne" is the word I used tot translate "please" in Middelsprake
                                > cq
                                > > Middelfolksprâk.
                                > > >
                                > > >Mag ig have de salt, gerne? can I have the salt, please?
                                > > >Kan du sege mi wat is dat, gerne? could you tell me what this is,
                                > please?
                                > > >
                                > > >Equivalents of "gerne" are German, Scandinavian and Low Saxon
                                > gerne and
                                > > Dutch gaarne (formal, normal = "graag")
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >Groeten
                                > > >Ingmar
                                > >
                                > > I think "gerne" would be good to mean "like to..." like it does in
                                > > german.
                                > >
                                > > DE "Ich lese gern Bücher" = I like to read books/I like reading
                                > books
                                > >
                                > > I myself am not so sure about using it as a word for "please"
                                > >
                                > > "Gerne" might make a good word for "you're welcome" or "my
                                > pleasure"
                                > > or "no problem".
                                > >
                                > > "Kann du wes-so-gôd sege mi wat is dis?" (Can you please tell me
                                > what
                                > > this is?)
                                > > "Dat is en appeltorte" (That is an apple pie)
                                > > "Tank di" (Thanks)
                                > > "Gerne" (You're welcome)
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > "behagen", yes, it's only used in old-sounding expressions (we
                                > love to
                                > > > use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely. But
                                > Lennon's
                                > > > idea was to use "please" in its two meanings in one sentence.
                                > Keeping
                                > > > that in mind, I said "wes so god at wese so god (to mi)". The
                                > Beatles
                                > > > wouldn't have made a number one hit with that line, though, I
                                > guess.
                                > > >
                                > > > Bye,
                                > > > Stephan
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL
                                > behagen, DE
                                > > > > behagen, SV behaga.
                                > > > > I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is
                                > represented in
                                > > > > "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"
                                > > > >
                                > > > > So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                                > > > > "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off the
                                > tongue,
                                > > > > don't you think?
                                > > > >
                                > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                                > > > > > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different
                                > words. The
                                > > > > > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is related
                                > to EN
                                > > > > > "leave", as far as I remember.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something like
                                > > > > > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Bye,
                                > > > > > Stephan
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                                > > > > > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u belieft"
                                > (if it
                                > > > pleases
                                > > > > > > you)
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > Jan-Willem
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words for "please"
                                > in
                                > > dutch:
                                > > > > > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd person
                                > > singular of
                                > > > > > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I think
                                > has the
                                > > > same
                                > > > > > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > >
                                > ___________________________________________________________
                                > > > > > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB
                                > > storage with
                                > > > > > All New Yahoo! Mail. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • stefichjo
                                I don t think there is any difference between DE gern and gerne at all. In Berlinish we often add an -e to words, I think in order to emphasize them, and
                                Message 15 of 22 , Aug 24 5:09 AM
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                                  I don't think there is any difference between DE "gern" and "gerne"
                                  at all.

                                  In Berlinish we often add an "-e" to words, I think in order to
                                  emphasize them, and "gerne" feels like having such an additional "-
                                  e".

                                  Bye,
                                  Stephan

                                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I've never understood the difference between "gern" and "gerne" in
                                  > German myself.
                                  > EN yearn is also cognate to "begehren"
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Cf. EN "yearn".
                                  > >
                                  > > gern: you're welcome, with pleasure
                                  > > tank di: thank you
                                  > > wes-so-god / wes so god at: please
                                  > >
                                  > > In German there are both "gern" and "gerne". I prefer FS words
                                  > > without arbitrary endings, that's why I'd chose "gern".
                                  > >
                                  > > Bye,
                                  > > Stephan
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Ingmar Roerdinkholder, who was part of this group once (or
                                  twice)
                                  > > made
                                  > > > this suggestion:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > >"Gerne" is the word I used tot translate "please" in
                                  Middelsprake
                                  > > cq
                                  > > > Middelfolksprâk.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >Mag ig have de salt, gerne? can I have the salt, please?
                                  > > > >Kan du sege mi wat is dat, gerne? could you tell me what this
                                  is,
                                  > > please?
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >Equivalents of "gerne" are German, Scandinavian and Low Saxon
                                  > > gerne and
                                  > > > Dutch gaarne (formal, normal = "graag")
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >Groeten
                                  > > > >Ingmar
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I think "gerne" would be good to mean "like to..." like it
                                  does in
                                  > > > german.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > DE "Ich lese gern Bücher" = I like to read books/I like
                                  reading
                                  > > books
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I myself am not so sure about using it as a word for "please"
                                  > > >
                                  > > > "Gerne" might make a good word for "you're welcome" or "my
                                  > > pleasure"
                                  > > > or "no problem".
                                  > > >
                                  > > > "Kann du wes-so-gôd sege mi wat is dis?" (Can you please tell
                                  me
                                  > > what
                                  > > > this is?)
                                  > > > "Dat is en appeltorte" (That is an apple pie)
                                  > > > "Tank di" (Thanks)
                                  > > > "Gerne" (You're welcome)
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > "behagen", yes, it's only used in old-sounding expressions
                                  (we
                                  > > love to
                                  > > > > use them in German a lot). So your wording sounds lovely.
                                  But
                                  > > Lennon's
                                  > > > > idea was to use "please" in its two meanings in one
                                  sentence.
                                  > > Keeping
                                  > > > > that in mind, I said "wes so god at wese so god (to mi)".
                                  The
                                  > > Beatles
                                  > > > > wouldn't have made a number one hit with that line, though,
                                  I
                                  > > guess.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Bye,
                                  > > > > Stephan
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@>
                                  wrote:
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > "Behage" would make a good verb for "to please". cf NL
                                  > > behagen, DE
                                  > > > > > behagen, SV behaga.
                                  > > > > > I'm not sure that the DE verb is very common, but it is
                                  > > represented in
                                  > > > > > "behaglich" and "behaglichkeit"
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > So the Beatles lyrics could be:
                                  > > > > > "Wes so gôd tô behage mi". Sound lovely, just rolls off
                                  the
                                  > > tongue,
                                  > > > > > don't you think?
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@>
                                  wrote:
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Cf. German: "Wenn es euch beliebt"
                                  > > > > > > Cf. French: "S'il vous plait"
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > So, "belieben" and "bleiben" are obviously two different
                                  > > words. The
                                  > > > > > > former is related to EN "believe" and the latter is
                                  related
                                  > > to EN
                                  > > > > > > "leave", as far as I remember.
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > I like FS "wes so god (to / at)" for "please".
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > The Beatles' song "please please me" would be something
                                  like
                                  > > > > > > "Wes so god at wese so god" :-I
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Bye,
                                  > > > > > > Stephan
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                                  > > > > > > <benjaminsjw@> wrote:
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > No, Alstublieft is a contraction of "als het u
                                  belieft"
                                  > > (if it
                                  > > > > pleases
                                  > > > > > > > you)
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > Jan-Willem
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > --- Hugo Cesar <hcesarcastro@> wrote:
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > > Now I understand the meaning of those words
                                  for "please"
                                  > > in
                                  > > > dutch:
                                  > > > > > > > > Both mean: "as you keep", als tu/je blijft (2nd
                                  person
                                  > > > singular of
                                  > > > > > > > > indicative present from the verb blijven, that I
                                  think
                                  > > has the
                                  > > > > same
                                  > > > > > > > > origin of the german verb bleiben).
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > ___________________________________________________________
                                  > > > > > > > Inbox full of spam? Get leading spam protection and 1GB
                                  > > > storage with
                                  > > > > > > All New Yahoo! Mail.
                                  http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • caenwyr
                                  have we reached an agreement about please yet?
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                    have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                  • David Parke
                                    There don t seem to be any serious objections to wes so gôd (be so good). So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement that you will find
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Sep 18, 2006
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                                      There don't seem to be any serious objections to "wes so gôd" (be so
                                      good).

                                      So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement that you
                                      will find in the world of Folksprâk.

                                      But I wouldn't say that the issued was closed, so if you have another
                                      suggestion, speak up.


                                      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "caenwyr" <pieterrottiers@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                      >
                                    • stefichjo
                                      I agree with you, David. This is our way of agreement. Since my so in Folksprak is sa , my Folksprak version of your Folksprâk wes so gôd is wes sa
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Sep 19, 2006
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                                        I agree with you, David. This is our way of agreement.

                                        Since my "so" in Folksprak is "sa", my Folksprak version of your
                                        Folksprâk "wes so gôd" is "wes sa god". (I think I wrote it "so".)
                                        Anyway, I feel agreeing. :-)

                                        Bye,
                                        Stephan

                                        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > There don't seem to be any serious objections to "wes so gôd" (be so
                                        > good).
                                        >
                                        > So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement that
                                        you
                                        > will find in the world of Folksprâk.
                                        >
                                        > But I wouldn't say that the issued was closed, so if you have another
                                        > suggestion, speak up.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "caenwyr" <pieterrottiers@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • stefichjo
                                        BTW, David - I cannot find a word like EN also or DE auch in your Überlist. Is there any? Bye, Stephan ... (be so ... that ... another
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Sep 19, 2006
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                                          BTW, David - I cannot find a word like EN "also" or DE "auch" in
                                          your Überlist. Is there any?

                                          Bye,
                                          Stephan

                                          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I agree with you, David. This is our way of agreement.
                                          >
                                          > Since my "so" in Folksprak is "sa", my Folksprak version of your
                                          > Folksprâk "wes so gôd" is "wes sa god". (I think I wrote it "so".)
                                          > Anyway, I feel agreeing. :-)
                                          >
                                          > Bye,
                                          > Stephan
                                          >
                                          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > There don't seem to be any serious objections to "wes so gôd"
                                          (be so
                                          > > good).
                                          > >
                                          > > So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement
                                          that
                                          > you
                                          > > will find in the world of Folksprâk.
                                          > >
                                          > > But I wouldn't say that the issued was closed, so if you have
                                          another
                                          > > suggestion, speak up.
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "caenwyr" <pieterrottiers@>
                                          wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                        • David Parke
                                          It s definitely there. Its oek , found between oejland and oer . (Substitute the oe with an oe ligature -- I can t seem to get this ligature to work with
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Sep 19, 2006
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                                            It's definitely there. Its "oek", found between "oejland" and "oer".
                                            (Substitute the "oe" with an oe ligature -- I can't seem to get this
                                            ligature to work with Yahoo!, no matter what I try.)

                                            Or do a search of the "English Translations" column for "also"

                                            BTW, the best way to use my Überlist as a dictionary is to remember
                                            that it is only intended to work as a Folksprâk to English dictionary.
                                            If you try to use it as a FS - DE dictionary, by using the "High
                                            German Cognate" column, you will sometimes encounter German words that
                                            have a FS cognate which doesn't mean the same thing as the DE word.

                                            For example if you search for a FS word for DE Zimmer, and search in
                                            the "High German Cognate" column for "Zimmer", you will find FS
                                            "timmer", cognate to DE Zimmer and EN timber. BUT FS "timmer" does NOT
                                            mean the same as DE Zimmer (das auf Deutsch "Saal" oder "Kammer" oder
                                            "Halle" bedeutet") FS timmer means DE Holz.

                                            The same goes for the "English Cognate" Column. FS aktuâl does NOT
                                            mean the same thing as EN actual.

                                            I am quite keen to add FS - DE and other translations to my Überlist.
                                            But each language massively increases my workload. There are in fact
                                            German, Dutch and Swedish translations columns in the Excel file, but
                                            they are hidden and mostly empty (I have filled a few in
                                            experimentally just to see how much more work is involved.)


                                            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > BTW, David - I cannot find a word like EN "also" or DE "auch" in
                                            > your Überlist. Is there any?
                                            >
                                            > Bye,
                                            > Stephan
                                            >
                                            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > I agree with you, David. This is our way of agreement.
                                            > >
                                            > > Since my "so" in Folksprak is "sa", my Folksprak version of your
                                            > > Folksprâk "wes so gôd" is "wes sa god". (I think I wrote it "so".)
                                            > > Anyway, I feel agreeing. :-)
                                            > >
                                            > > Bye,
                                            > > Stephan
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > There don't seem to be any serious objections to "wes so gôd"
                                            > (be so
                                            > > > good).
                                            > > >
                                            > > > So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement
                                            > that
                                            > > you
                                            > > > will find in the world of Folksprâk.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > But I wouldn't say that the issued was closed, so if you have
                                            > another
                                            > > > suggestion, speak up.
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "caenwyr" <pieterrottiers@>
                                            > wrote:
                                            > > > >
                                            > > > > have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                            > > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • stefichjo
                                            I see! I forgot you often (always?) make PG *au to oe . I have ok . Do you have words like oekso and allso as well? (I cannot open the Überlist right
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Sep 19, 2006
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                                              I see! I forgot you often (always?) make PG *au to "oe". I have "ok".
                                              Do you have words like "oekso" and "allso" as well? (I cannot open the
                                              Überlist right now, sorry.)
                                              I'm asking because of "so".


                                              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > It's definitely there. Its "oek", found between "oejland" and "oer".
                                              > (Substitute the "oe" with an oe ligature -- I can't seem to get this
                                              > ligature to work with Yahoo!, no matter what I try.)
                                              >
                                              > Or do a search of the "English Translations" column for "also"
                                              >
                                              > BTW, the best way to use my Überlist as a dictionary is to remember
                                              > that it is only intended to work as a Folksprâk to English dictionary.
                                              > If you try to use it as a FS - DE dictionary, by using the "High
                                              > German Cognate" column, you will sometimes encounter German words that
                                              > have a FS cognate which doesn't mean the same thing as the DE word.
                                              >
                                              > For example if you search for a FS word for DE Zimmer, and search in
                                              > the "High German Cognate" column for "Zimmer", you will find FS
                                              > "timmer", cognate to DE Zimmer and EN timber. BUT FS "timmer" does NOT
                                              > mean the same as DE Zimmer (das auf Deutsch "Saal" oder "Kammer" oder
                                              > "Halle" bedeutet") FS timmer means DE Holz.
                                              >
                                              > The same goes for the "English Cognate" Column. FS aktuâl does NOT
                                              > mean the same thing as EN actual.
                                              >
                                              > I am quite keen to add FS - DE and other translations to my Überlist.
                                              > But each language massively increases my workload. There are in fact
                                              > German, Dutch and Swedish translations columns in the Excel file, but
                                              > they are hidden and mostly empty (I have filled a few in
                                              > experimentally just to see how much more work is involved.)
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                              > >
                                              > > BTW, David - I cannot find a word like EN "also" or DE "auch" in
                                              > > your Überlist. Is there any?
                                              > >
                                              > > Bye,
                                              > > Stephan
                                              > >
                                              > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                                              > > >
                                              > > > I agree with you, David. This is our way of agreement.
                                              > > >
                                              > > > Since my "so" in Folksprak is "sa", my Folksprak version of your
                                              > > > Folksprâk "wes so gôd" is "wes sa god". (I think I wrote it "so".)
                                              > > > Anyway, I feel agreeing. :-)
                                              > > >
                                              > > > Bye,
                                              > > > Stephan
                                              > > >
                                              > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
                                              > > > >
                                              > > > > There don't seem to be any serious objections to "wes so gôd"
                                              > > (be so
                                              > > > > good).
                                              > > > >
                                              > > > > So I would say that was about as good a reaching an agreement
                                              > > that
                                              > > > you
                                              > > > > will find in the world of Folksprâk.
                                              > > > >
                                              > > > > But I wouldn't say that the issued was closed, so if you have
                                              > > another
                                              > > > > suggestion, speak up.
                                              > > > >
                                              > > > >
                                              > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "caenwyr" <pieterrottiers@>
                                              > > wrote:
                                              > > > > >
                                              > > > > > have we reached an agreement about "please" yet?
                                              > > > > >
                                              > > > >
                                              > > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • David Parke
                                              PG *auk pretty much always becomes oek in my FS dialect. . There might be a few cases where *au is changed by i-mutation to iu (can t think of any though)
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Sep 20, 2006
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                                                PG *auk pretty much always becomes "oek" in my FS dialect. . There might
                                                be a few cases where *au is changed by i-mutation to "iu" (can't think
                                                of any though)

                                                A word like *allso would have similar meaning in FS to DE also, NL alzo
                                                and Scandy altså and not like EN also.
                                                I'm not so sure if *auk + so is really necessary in FS, only
                                                scandinavian seems to use that construction, and how would "oekso"
                                                differ in meaning from "oek"


                                                stefichjo wrote:

                                                > I see! I forgot you often (always?) make PG *au to "oe". I have "ok".
                                                > Do you have words like "oekso" and "allso" as well? (I cannot open the
                                                > Überlist right now, sorry.)
                                                > I'm asking because of "so".
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
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