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Chemisk elemente

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  • Anders
    Coming back after the vacation I have reviewed the messages accumulationg in this group. I would like to add my penny of thoughts concerning the chemical
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 25, 2006
      Coming back after the vacation I have reviewed the messages
      accumulationg in this group. I would like to add my penny of thoughts
      concerning the chemical elements.

      Silicon has a peculiar name in Swedish: kisel (pronounced approximately
      "CHEE-sel"). It is originally a kind of white quartz mineral that is
      common in the hills. Unlike silicon, kisel is a germanic word and
      should possibly be added to the Wordskatt in some shape.

      Tungsten is pure Swedish, meaning "heavy stone". However, it is
      obsolete and has been subsituted by the internationally accepted
      Wolfram. (Does that mean "wolf's paw" in German?) I therefore think
      that tungsten should be optional in the Wordskatt.

      Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen have short and snappy names in Swedish.
      Syre = "making acidic"-stuff, Kväve = "suffocator"-stuff, Väte =
      "making wet"-stuff. Therefore I like seeing "watersoff" in the
      Wordskatt.

      Any comments?

      Anders

      Du stora storm, du är min själ, och du är utan bo,
      du sett för mycket för att vila mer.
      Men hälsa allt som andas i tysta dalars ro
      och säg mig alla under som där sker!
      --Dan Andersson
    • David Parke
      ... Yeah, I agree that Wolfram should be preferable to tungsten -- especially since tungsten is obsolete in scandinavian. Wolfram is also in English but it
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 25, 2006
        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Anders <entulesse@...> wrote:
        >
        > Coming back after the vacation I have reviewed the messages
        > accumulationg in this group. I would like to add my penny of thoughts
        > concerning the chemical elements.
        >
        > Silicon has a peculiar name in Swedish: kisel (pronounced approximately
        > "CHEE-sel"). It is originally a kind of white quartz mineral that is
        > common in the hills. Unlike silicon, kisel is a germanic word and
        > should possibly be added to the Wordskatt in some shape.
        >
        > Tungsten is pure Swedish, meaning "heavy stone". However, it is
        > obsolete and has been subsituted by the internationally accepted
        > Wolfram. (Does that mean "wolf's paw" in German?) I therefore think
        > that tungsten should be optional in the Wordskatt.

        Yeah, I agree that Wolfram should be preferable to tungsten --
        especially since "tungsten" is obsolete in scandinavian. "Wolfram" is
        also in English but it is obsolete and been replaced with Tungsten..
        The chemical symbol is "W" and I'm all for making things less confusing.

        >
        > Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen have short and snappy names in Swedish.
        > Syre = "making acidic"-stuff, Kväve = "suffocator"-stuff, Väte =
        > "making wet"-stuff. Therefore I like seeing "watersoff" in the
        > Wordskatt.
        >

        How does swedish deal with words like "-oxide", "nitrous-",
        "-nitrate", "nitric", "-hydrate". "-sulphide", "-sulphate"?


        > Any comments?
        >
        > Anders
        >
        > Du stora storm, du är min själ, och du är utan bo,
        > du sett för mycket för att vila mer.
        > Men hälsa allt som andas i tysta dalars ro
        > och säg mig alla under som där sker!
        > --Dan Andersson
        >
      • Wolfram Antepohl
        In Swedish, chemical elements used as a prefix keep their Swedish name while suffixes are in international chemical nomenclature. Nitrous oxide (NO) hence
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 25, 2006
          In Swedish, chemical elements used as a "prefix" keep their Swedish name
          while "suffixes" are in international chemical nomenclature. Nitrous oxide
          (NO) hence is Kväveoxid in Swedish, sulfurdioxide is svaveldioxid and so
          forth.

          Anders, if you are interested in the etymology of "Wolfram" (the metal, not
          the name), please see my humble message of June 22.

          Greetings


          Wolfram

          --
          Wolfram Antepohl
          Gistad Furulid
          SE-590 62 Linghem
          013 - 125243, 073 - 6002667
          wolfram@...
          -----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
          Från: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:folkspraak@yahoogroups.com] För
          David Parke
          Skickat: den 25 juli 2006 14:27
          Till: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
          Ämne: [folkspraak] Re: Chemisk elemente

          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Anders <entulesse@...> wrote:
          >
          > Coming back after the vacation I have reviewed the messages
          > accumulationg in this group. I would like to add my penny of thoughts
          > concerning the chemical elements.
          >
          > Silicon has a peculiar name in Swedish: kisel (pronounced approximately
          > "CHEE-sel"). It is originally a kind of white quartz mineral that is
          > common in the hills. Unlike silicon, kisel is a germanic word and
          > should possibly be added to the Wordskatt in some shape.
          >
          > Tungsten is pure Swedish, meaning "heavy stone". However, it is
          > obsolete and has been subsituted by the internationally accepted
          > Wolfram. (Does that mean "wolf's paw" in German?) I therefore think
          > that tungsten should be optional in the Wordskatt.

          Yeah, I agree that Wolfram should be preferable to tungsten --
          especially since "tungsten" is obsolete in scandinavian. "Wolfram" is
          also in English but it is obsolete and been replaced with Tungsten..
          The chemical symbol is "W" and I'm all for making things less confusing.

          >
          > Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen have short and snappy names in Swedish.
          > Syre = "making acidic"-stuff, Kväve = "suffocator"-stuff, Väte =
          > "making wet"-stuff. Therefore I like seeing "watersoff" in the
          > Wordskatt.
          >

          How does swedish deal with words like "-oxide", "nitrous-",
          "-nitrate", "nitric", "-hydrate". "-sulphide", "-sulphate"?


          > Any comments?
          >
          > Anders
          >
          > Du stora storm, du är min själ, och du är utan bo,
          > du sett för mycket för att vila mer.
          > Men hälsa allt som andas i tysta dalars ro
          > och säg mig alla under som där sker!
          > --Dan Andersson
          >






          Browse the draft word lists!
          http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
          http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html

          Browse Folkspraak-related links!
          http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/

          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • David Parke
          So copper sulphate is kopparsulfat ? Not *kopparsvavelat? ... oxide ... metal, not ... approximately ... confusing.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 25, 2006
            So copper sulphate is "kopparsulfat"? Not *kopparsvavelat?

            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Wolfram Antepohl" <wolfram@...> wrote:
            >
            > In Swedish, chemical elements used as a "prefix" keep their Swedish name
            > while "suffixes" are in international chemical nomenclature. Nitrous
            oxide
            > (NO) hence is Kväveoxid in Swedish, sulfurdioxide is svaveldioxid and so
            > forth.
            >
            > Anders, if you are interested in the etymology of "Wolfram" (the
            metal, not
            > the name), please see my humble message of June 22.
            >
            > Greetings
            >
            >
            > Wolfram
            >
            > --
            > Wolfram Antepohl
            > Gistad Furulid
            > SE-590 62 Linghem
            > 013 - 125243, 073 - 6002667
            > wolfram@...
            > -----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
            > Från: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:folkspraak@yahoogroups.com] För
            > David Parke
            > Skickat: den 25 juli 2006 14:27
            > Till: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
            > Ämne: [folkspraak] Re: Chemisk elemente
            >
            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Anders <entulesse@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Coming back after the vacation I have reviewed the messages
            > > accumulationg in this group. I would like to add my penny of thoughts
            > > concerning the chemical elements.
            > >
            > > Silicon has a peculiar name in Swedish: kisel (pronounced
            approximately
            > > "CHEE-sel"). It is originally a kind of white quartz mineral that is
            > > common in the hills. Unlike silicon, kisel is a germanic word and
            > > should possibly be added to the Wordskatt in some shape.
            > >
            > > Tungsten is pure Swedish, meaning "heavy stone". However, it is
            > > obsolete and has been subsituted by the internationally accepted
            > > Wolfram. (Does that mean "wolf's paw" in German?) I therefore think
            > > that tungsten should be optional in the Wordskatt.
            >
            > Yeah, I agree that Wolfram should be preferable to tungsten --
            > especially since "tungsten" is obsolete in scandinavian. "Wolfram" is
            > also in English but it is obsolete and been replaced with Tungsten..
            > The chemical symbol is "W" and I'm all for making things less
            confusing.
            >
            > >
            > > Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen have short and snappy names in Swedish.
            > > Syre = "making acidic"-stuff, Kväve = "suffocator"-stuff, Väte =
            > > "making wet"-stuff. Therefore I like seeing "watersoff" in the
            > > Wordskatt.
            > >
            >
            > How does swedish deal with words like "-oxide", "nitrous-",
            > "-nitrate", "nitric", "-hydrate". "-sulphide", "-sulphate"?
            >
            >
            > > Any comments?
            > >
            > > Anders
            > >
            > > Du stora storm, du är min själ, och du är utan bo,
            > > du sett för mycket för att vila mer.
            > > Men hälsa allt som andas i tysta dalars ro
            > > och säg mig alla under som där sker!
            > > --Dan Andersson
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Browse the draft word lists!
            > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
            > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
            >
            > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
            > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
          • Wolfram Antepohl
            So copper sulphate is kopparsulfat ? Not *kopparsvavelat? Yes, kopparsulfat is correct in Swedish. And the same principle applies to German:
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 25, 2006
              So copper sulphate is "kopparsulfat"? Not *kopparsvavelat?

              Yes, "kopparsulfat" is correct in Swedish. And the same principle applies to
              German: Stick(-stoff)oxid, Kupfersulfat, Schwefeldioxid ...

              Wolfram
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