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Re: Re: [folkspraak] verb endings and plural

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  • Daan
    ... I see your point... however... They will not be confused! I speak Dutch, which uses -en both for infinitives and plurals; and they are not confused, thanks
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 30, 2001
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      > Hey, I just realised (i'm hardly a full-time folkspraaker!) that if plurals
      > are changed to end "-en", then won't they get confused with infinitive verb
      > endings!?

      I see your point... however...

      They will not be confused!

      I speak Dutch, which uses -en both for infinitives and plurals; and they are
      not confused, thanks to two simple systems: the article and capitalisation.

      English Dutch Folkspraak
      the fish de vis det Fisk
      the fishes de vissen die Fisken
      to fish vissen fisken

      so "die Fisken" is a noun, "fisken" is a verb.
    • Daan
      One little note: what about stems ending in -e (or another vowel)? go gaa to go gaaen? gaan? gaen? bag taske bags taskeen? tasken? Actually, I go for gaan
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 30, 2001
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        One little note:

        what about stems ending in -e (or another vowel)?

        go gaa
        to go gaaen? gaan? gaen?

        bag taske
        bags taskeen? tasken?

        Actually, I go for gaan and tasken, but probably not-Dutch speakers would prefer another variant...
      • Jan-Willem Benjamins
        That risk exists. However, both dutch and german do things that way ,and from a life-long experience in dutch, I can say that it rarely leads to problems. But
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 2 1:27 AM
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          That risk exists.
          However, both dutch and german do things that way ,and from a life-long
          experience in dutch, I can say that it rarely leads to problems.
          But maybe, to avoid all complications, we should make plurals with -s.

          adjys

          Jan-Willem

          --- Xipirho <xipirho@...> skrev: > Hey, I just realised (i'm
          hardly a full-time folkspraaker!) that if
          > plurals
          > are changed to end "-en", then won't they get confused with
          > infinitive verb
          > endings!?
          >
          >
          > Elen síla lúmenn' omentielvo. Roly/Orly/Vinyacálë.
          >


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        • Christopher Burd
          ... I agree the FS modal auxiliaries should maintain a distinction between desire and simple futurity. German soll(en) means should rather than shall in
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 12 9:50 AM
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            At 04:39 PM 01 03 02 -0000, you wrote:
            > Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 23:06:21 -0600
            > From: William G Beazley <beazley@...>
            >Subject: Shall vs Will
            >
            >Not sure if it has been covered yet.
            >
            >ik wille etten, etc. = "I shall eat"
            >
            >Causes some questions for me in the Grammar.
            >
            >This Grammar only seems to be a reflection of American English.
            >
            >In Formal English, German and Swedish I find this:
            >
            >
            >English German Swedish
            >shall soll ska
            >will(desire) will vill

            I agree the FS modal auxiliaries should maintain a distinction between
            desire and simple futurity. German "soll(en)" means 'should' rather than
            'shall' in the sense of futurity (in formal British English, obviously,
            "shall" can have sense of N. American "should").

            German expresses futurity through _werden_ ('to become') + the infinitive:
            "Ich werde im Fernosten reisen." 'I shall travel in the Far East.'

            Chris
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